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View Full Version : Death grip, loose grip, golf grip


MayDay
10-22-2009, 11:36 PM
I never realized it until I started searching and reading for wrist soreness related issue in this forum (thank god for TT@TW)- I was muscling the ball on all my stokes with a death grip. Serves, forehand, backhand, volley, etc. I've watched a ton of youtube and FYB instructions, but it doesn't seem to explicitly point out any information on grip strenth.

I've been playing golf for a while now, and it was critical that you have a loose soft grip (with relaxed wrist) up to the moment you make contact with the ball to get the most distance with the driver. (The grip naturally tighens up during impact through pronation just enough so that the club doesn't fly out of the hands.) I took that same soft grip feeling and tried it during my hitting session today. EVERYTHING FELT SO GOOD.

I just wished that I recognized my death grip mistake sooner instead of concentrating on other mechanics that are actually the result of a nice loose grip. "Grip and rip" has new meaning to me now....

Oh, and with the relaxed grip, my sore wrist did not act up, actually, it feels just fine. :grin:

myservenow
10-23-2009, 08:07 AM
I've played tennis off and on since 1989. I even played college tennis in the 90s. I didn't play for ten years after college and recently got back into the game.

As far as I can remember, no one ever told me to hold the racquet with a light or loose grip. I am sure that I have always held the racquet with a death grip.

This past summer I developed terrible tennis elbow while serving in a tournament. I could barely finish the set or even hold my racquet. I had been icing my arm after every hitting session with some success, but finally had had enough.

I started asking around this site for some advice and someone asked about my grip strength. I started paying attention to it and tried to use a loose grip on strokes and serves until right at impact. It has helped tremendously.

I have done other things (lower string tension, etc.) but the looser grip is something I try to pass on to others that I play tennis with. It is a great instructional tip.

Morgan
02-17-2011, 05:28 PM
I never realized it until I started searching and reading for wrist soreness related issue in this forum (thank god for TT@TW)- I was muscling the ball on all my stokes with a death grip. Serves, forehand, backhand, volley, etc. I've watched a ton of youtube and FYB instructions, but it doesn't seem to explicitly point out any information on grip strenth.

I've been playing golf for a while now, and it was critical that you have a loose soft grip (with relaxed wrist) up to the moment you make contact with the ball to get the most distance with the driver. (The grip naturally tighens up during impact through pronation just enough so that the club doesn't fly out of the hands.) I took that same soft grip feeling and tried it during my hitting session today. EVERYTHING FELT SO GOOD.

I just wished that I recognized my death grip mistake sooner instead of concentrating on other mechanics that are actually the result of a nice loose grip. "Grip and rip" has new meaning to me now....

Oh, and with the relaxed grip, my sore wrist did not act up, actually, it feels just fine. :grin:

Thanks for the information. I'm trying to figure out why I have a bad case of tendonitis (elbow). I think I have a death grip on my tennis racket. Longtime golfer here - and I usually have a soft grip on my clubs.

LeeD
02-17-2011, 05:58 PM
Loose grip on prep and takeback, right up to half your forward swing, then tighter, not tight grip at moment of impact if you're going for a hard hit heavy ball.
Rallyball, loose grip to allow natural pronation and not to long a ball.

rfhjr
02-18-2011, 07:07 AM
In taking tennis grip on a scale of 1 - 5 where 1 is loose and 5 is a tight or death grip; most tennis pros grips would be between 1 and 2. Control with the ground strokes is maintained with a locked wrist in the laid back position with a loose grip. Most amateurs tennis players do the opposite loose wrist with a tight grip.

LeeD
02-18-2011, 10:49 AM
Most volleys might need a 3, while putaway high volleys maybe a 4.

corners
02-18-2011, 06:44 PM
Anyone notice that Federer holds his thumb straight, not gripping at all, until the moment he pulls forward on the handle to initiate the stroke.

Even at contact his grip is loose enough that his frame twists on any off-center shots. It looks to me that he is using the minimal grip pressure required to hold onto the racquet, all the way into contact.

Using a smaller grip can help with this.

LeeD
02-18-2011, 06:47 PM
You might be mistaken.
A smaller grip allows your wrist to relax so the racket can come thru with more speed.
A BIGGER grip would allow you to hold softly and still keep the racket from twisting, as more surface area contacted ='s more grip.

corners
02-19-2011, 12:52 AM
You might be mistaken.

Yes, I might be mistaken.

A smaller grip allows your wrist to relax so the racket can come thru with more speed.

Why and how is this so? What's the rationale? Do you have any evidence? This is often talked about, but as far as I know there isn't any evidence for it; there isn't even a credible rationale to explain it, as far as I know.

A BIGGER grip would allow you to hold softly and still keep the racket from twisting, as more surface area contacted ='s more grip.

The maximum surface area contacted is the area of the palm and fingers. A bigger grip doesn't make the hand bigger. :)

dozu
02-19-2011, 04:36 AM
start from 3:50, about grip pressure and grip size.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFGrmHocmjM

10ACE
02-19-2011, 08:25 AM
start from 3:50, about grip pressure and grip size.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFGrmHocmjM

Very good- and how I feel on the subject- he makes a great point about the pressure on the grip for each shot and how balance is more important then

MayDay
02-19-2011, 06:24 PM
Nice tips in the video.

I've been keeping with the loose grip (as described very well by LeeD) and all is well. As I try and keep just one "swing thought", instead of loose grip, I've been focusing on the feeling of my wrist angle - I try and keep my wrist position pretty stable (or firm), meaning that if have my wrist in reverse wrist curl position (eastern or semi western forehand), I keep that wrist bent in place through out most of the forehand/backahnd swing (only let it break in the later stage of the follow through after contact).

Loose grip/hands, loose arms (allows for easy pronation), loose everything, but firm/stable wrist angle relative to the forearm.

LeeD
02-19-2011, 06:51 PM
Imagine yourself holding a baseball bat. Hold the handle, smaller than any tennis racket, while bud hold the business end, the fat end. You both twist. Now switch sides, you both twist.
Bigger gives you more surface area to hold.
Now grip both ends at different times, and check your wrist flexibility holding the two different ends of the bat. Fat end, you have limited wrist flex. Skinny end, you have much more freedom.

corners
02-20-2011, 01:57 AM
Imagine yourself holding a baseball bat. Hold the handle, smaller than any tennis racket, while bud hold the business end, the fat end. You both twist. Now switch sides, you both twist.
Bigger gives you more surface area to hold.
Now grip both ends at different times, and check your wrist flexibility holding the two different ends of the bat. Fat end, you have limited wrist flex. Skinny end, you have much more freedom.

Yeah, but a bat handle is much smaller than a racquet handle. Even if you go down a size, your handle will still be too large to overlap any fingers, so the amount of handle you contact will always be the same: the surface area of your palm and fingers.

I don't disagree with your point about wrist freedom, but it's something that anatomists and biomechanics guys say doesn't make any sense to them.

Further, if you're saying that large grips allow looser grips BUT constrain wrist movement, there's a contradiction there: Wrist movement is limited by tension in the forearm muscles that pass through the wrist on their way to the hand. Those muscles are also responsible for the majority of grip strength. So if a large handle allows a looser grip, then we'd expect freer wrist movement along with that. But this is the opposite of what you're saying.

Morgan
02-22-2011, 02:19 PM
Loose grip on prep and takeback, right up to half your forward swing, then tighter, not tight grip at moment of impact if you're going for a hard hit heavy ball.
Rallyball, loose grip to allow natural pronation and not to long a ball.

Thaniks - Will try.

Morgan
02-22-2011, 02:21 PM
I've played tennis off and on since 1989. I even played college tennis in the 90s. I didn't play for ten years after college and recently got back into the game.

As far as I can remember, no one ever told me to hold the racquet with a light or loose grip. I am sure that I have always held the racquet with a death grip.

This past summer I developed terrible tennis elbow while serving in a tournament. I could barely finish the set or even hold my racquet. I had been icing my arm after every hitting session with some success, but finally had had enough.

I started asking around this site for some advice and someone asked about my grip strength. I started paying attention to it and tried to use a loose grip on strokes and serves until right at impact. It has helped tremendously.

I have done other things (lower string tension, etc.) but the looser grip is something I try to pass on to others that I play tennis with. It is a great instructional tip.


Thanks for the tip.

LeeD
02-22-2011, 04:01 PM
Corners, you can argue all you want, but everyone knows a smaller grip allows more wrist flexibility while a larger grip locks out the wrist.
I don't need to argue over such a silly issue. Use the grip you want, while I choose a 4 5/8th grip for this 5'11", 150 lbs'er.