PDA

View Full Version : Tennis Magazine: Serving Out Wide


Cindysphinx
10-27-2009, 05:08 AM
This month's issue of Tennis Magazine has an article on how to serve out wide. In the example given, the player is pictured with his front foot pointed toward the netpost, planning to serve wide in the deuce court.

The advice was to bring the back foot more toward the right, so that the toe of the back foot is actually farther to the right than the toe of the front foot. The idea is that you would start out pointed more toward the intended target, I think. The author acknowledged that changing your stance is something your opponent can read, but argued that being able to place the serve out wide still achieves its purpose of pulling the opponent off the court.

I'm wondering if the experts here think this is good advice, and if so, for what levels.

I do not consciously vary my stance or starting location for the purpose of hitting a certain spot. I always thought the element of surprise was important, even at my 3.5 level.

I say that because I am always greatly relieved to see an opponent who telegraphs the serve placement. I will adjust my receiving position, secure in the knowledge that the serve will go where I expect it to go. This allows me to plan what I want to do with my return a little better and allows me to do things like running around my backhand by cheating over. This is especially helpful in mixed, when the serves are coming faster.

So what do you think of Tennis Magazine's advice?

mikeler
10-27-2009, 05:25 AM
I don't try and do anything that will telegraph the direction I'm going with my serve.

sureshs
10-27-2009, 05:28 AM
I was surprised by it too. I thought not angling the feet would result in much less shoulder rotation. There is so much weird instruction out there.

I found one video on the web which says never toss with arm straight and in line with the front foot, but always in a J or tear shaped motion, bringing the left hand to the right hip, and then releasing it in a curved motion to 1 o'clock. The same day I found another video which said never do the above, it is bad advice!

GuyClinch
10-27-2009, 05:33 AM
The advice was to bring the back foot more toward the right, so that the toe of the back foot is actually farther to the right than the toe of the front foot. The idea is that you would start out pointed more toward the intended target, I think. The author acknowledged that changing your stance is something your opponent can read, but argued that being able to place the serve out wide still achieves its purpose of pulling the opponent off the court.

Interesting. Since my accuracy isn't exactly perfect I am going to try this out. I haven't really experimented much with this. I did read something similiar about varying your stance on the ad and deuce courts but I can't say i do that either.

I say that because I am always greatly relieved to see an opponent who telegraphs the serve placement. I will adjust my receiving position, secure in the knowledge that the serve will go where I expect it to go. This allows me to plan what I want to do with my return a little better and allows me to do things like running around my backhand by cheating over. This is especially helpful in mixed, when the serves are coming faster.

I think some better opponents could pick up on this - and take advantage of your guessing by picking an "out wide" stance and still hitting up the middle or vice versa.

I think this is pretty easy to do with location. I like to move farther out to serve out wide. However I can still hit some serves up the middle from that spot.

I know from experience that if you move around on the baseline when you serve sometimes you catch people who don't react to your postion. A great thing to try out is this..

You catch some person who really wants to hit their forehand. So when your serving to the deuce court they stand too far to the middle. So slide all the way over - and if they don't move (more towards the alley). Hit a slice serve where you try to get the serve to curve and land short but out wide.

Its great fun if you hit that shot - you can ace people on like a 70 MPH serve. its actually more fun then a power ace, IMHO.

Pete

Cindysphinx
10-27-2009, 05:59 AM
I think some better opponents could pick up on this - and take advantage of your guessing by picking an "out wide" stance and still hitting up the middle or vice versa.

Perhaps. In my experience, what usually happens is that the person sees my Xtreme starting position and then tries to do something they haven't yet mastered, causing them to fault. After all, the justification for my Xtreme receiving position is what I have already observed about their serve. Of course, if you're up against somene with the control and accuracy to burn you from any starting position or stance, they probably aren't 3.5! :)

I think this is pretty easy to do with location. I like to move farther out to serve out wide. However I can still hit some serves up the middle from that spot.

I'm not seeing 3.5 or 4.0 women who can move wide to serve and still burn me up the middle. Nope, if they move out wide, that serve is going wide. If it goes up the middle, it will head right toward me and will be something I can reach.

I know from experience that if you move around on the baseline when you serve sometimes you catch people who don't react to your postion. A great thing to try out is this..

Now, I hadn't figured on that. Maybe everybody doesn't know how to adjust to this? Perhaps I will try it in practice to see if it yields some easy points. I'd be surprised if it works more than once in a match, if that, though. I would guess most 3.5+ players know where to stand to receive serve if the server changes position.

And yeah, Sureshs, angling yourself more toward the net does seem like it would reduce your shoulder rotation . . . .

gzhpcu
10-27-2009, 06:21 AM
I had read an article years back by Pat Rafter saying that he just had his body move forward in the direction he was going to hit the serve.

maxpotapov
10-27-2009, 06:42 AM
Yeah, and don't forget about tongue (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4161/is_20040613/ai_n12898143/)

mikeler
10-27-2009, 06:52 AM
Yeah, and don't forget about tongue (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4161/is_20040613/ai_n12898143/)


Andre told this story a few years ago during the US Open. I wonder if he picked up on it or one of his coaches did.

sh@de
10-27-2009, 07:00 AM
For me, I keep everything about my serve the same wherever I'm hitting in order to get more disguise. To be honest, I don't agree with the mag's advice, but then again, I've worked on my serve for ages (it's my best stroke by faaaaar) so...

Lefty5
10-27-2009, 07:23 AM
I think a good idea would be to lick your finger and then point to the corner you're going to hit it. Telegraphing is always a good idea in tennis, not! Maybe they forgot to say that technique is for beginners really struggling to move thier serve around the box...

larry10s
10-27-2009, 07:29 AM
my $.02 telegraphing your serve is not the best thing to do especially if you plan to go higher than 3.5. at 3.5 being able to make the ball go where you want it is still a challenge so being consistent in having the returner start from a certain location or hitting a backhand or forehand is very helpfull. in reality even at the upper levels aces and return winners are not the way the majority of points end. so for example in singles if you get the person returning from outside the alley you have a lot of open court to hit into and make him scamper to get the ball. even if he knows you are serveing wide. if you are turned too much away from the net ie macenroe then it can make it difficult to rotate enough to serve wide, standing more perpendicular to the net allows for MORE shoulder rotation to the left(wide)

Ucantplay2much
10-27-2009, 07:53 AM
Yeah, and don't forget about tongue (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4161/is_20040613/ai_n12898143/)

That's hilarious :) It reminds me of a football story from long way back. A running back (maybe Tony Dorsett) only put his mouthguard in when the play called for him to get the ball. An opposing team picked up on it and completely shut him down that game.

Nellie
10-27-2009, 08:21 AM
Cindy -
I would not worry too much about telegraphing. I would bet that most of the time, your opponents at 3.5/4.0 are not watching you, and if they were, they are not paying attention to your feet. Further, I would bet that most of your serves are pretty predictable, if you watched yourself on film.

Instead, I would worry much more about getting your serves in and hitting the angles/spins that you want than trying to disguise the serve.

I played a doubles match recently where I knew the serve was going wide, and I still could not handle it because he was pulling me off the court so much that I could not make an effective return without hitting the ball right to the partner.

Just my 2 cents.

skiracer55
10-27-2009, 09:34 AM
I was surprised by it too. I thought not angling the feet would result in much less shoulder rotation. There is so much weird instruction out there.

I found one video on the web which says never toss with arm straight and in line with the front foot, but always in a J or tear shaped motion, bringing the left hand to the right hip, and then releasing it in a curved motion to 1 o'clock. The same day I found another video which said never do the above, it is bad advice!

...there's a story that when Pete Fischer was working on Sampras' serve, he had Pete toss, and then right before Sampras made contact, Fischer would yell "slice" or "kick" or "body" or something like that so Sampras would have to make a small adjustment at the last instant to get the desired direction. If you have a consistent toss and a clean motion, you should be able to change the direction...and the spin, and the pace...just by small variations in how and where you make contact with the ball...

LeeD
10-27-2009, 09:41 AM
I think to change the swing plane, rather than your stance, works better. Your stance is a CONSTANT, which you can base off of for every swing on your serves.
No need to face the direction you're hitting to, as you don't on any groundies.
Changing the swing plane means to change the location of the followthru, causing a different swing path of the racketface.

junbumkim
10-27-2009, 09:46 AM
I couldn't hit a slice serve with plantform stance, but I can hit a pretty good ones with pinpoint stance.

So I can sort of see what the article is saying.

I agree with most of you that this is probably not the best thing to do. In additon, you might actually step over the baseline with your right foot while doing this.

If you can still hit other serves from this stance, it might be worthwhile trying to change.

Although disguise important, execution can supercede disguise if the quaility is there. At the same time, if the quaility isn't there, disguise can be pretty useless. If I can hit a real nasty slice serve, it may not matter whether you know it's coming because I can still pull you off the court or you can't handle the quaility of the serve.

Burt Turkoglu
10-27-2009, 04:11 PM
I had read an article years back by Pat Rafter saying that he just had his body move forward in the direction he was going to hit the serve.

This is what works for me. I lean my hip in the direction I want to serve to (while keeping the hip still closed). I feel this disguises it a little better. Different things are key for different people. Just experiment and find out what works best.

Geezer Guy
10-27-2009, 05:43 PM
I'm OK with the Tennis magazine advice. I received that same advice from a pro several years ago, and still do it. As far as I know, my opponents (at least the majority) have not picked up on it. It's not really that obvious from 75 feet away.

And anyway, I accidently hit enough of my "wide" serves down the middle or into their body that my opponent really has no more knowledge of where my serve is going than I do.

And, you know, so what? Even if they anticipate where I'm going - if I hit that wide serve really well it's tough to get back. Especially if it catches the line.

Ken Honecker
10-28-2009, 01:48 AM
I'm enough of an *** that I call my serves every now and then simply to let the other player now how lightly I take them. Sometimes the ball even goes where I'm aiming which surprises both of us. Anyhow it sure is a good way to get your opponant thinking. "Is he really going to do what he said?", "should I move over and cover?"

But then I've been known to call my shot in softball, pointing high into the trees in foul territory or out into the parking lot behind the backstop.

GuyClinch
10-28-2009, 05:34 AM
Although disguise important, execution can supercede disguise if the quaility is there. At the same time, if the quaility isn't there, disguise can be pretty useless. If I can hit a real nasty slice serve, it may not matter whether you know it's coming because I can still pull you off the court or you can't handle the quaility of the serve.

I think (especially at the 3.5 and 4.0 levels) execution trumps both strategy and disguise, IMHO. All you have to do is hit consistent but quality shots and you will win.

That being said I don't think moving your back foot and changing your angle ruins your disguise. Brad Gilbert has a drill where you serve with a fully open stance. If you try this drill you will find you can hit serves to alot of different spots with your backfoot in a ridiculous position.

http://www.sportskool.com/videos/fine-tuning-your-serve

This is a great video BTW. Though the MTM crowd will mock me for being aware of too many videos since I am not great myself <g>

Go to 6:48 if you just want to see the open stance drills.

I just don't have an open court like these guys with baskets of balls to PRACTICE these drills. Oh BTW Brad is a good coach IMHO. On a few occasions I have been early to a lesson and have been able to practice a bit. But that's the only time. Here in NYC even if you get court time you only get three balls on the court at once in public courts. :( I should move to California.

Also the Anna Kournikova stretching video is pretty awesome in its own way..haha.

Pete

Camilio Pascual
10-28-2009, 07:52 AM
I think (especially at the 3.5 and 4.0 levels) execution trumps both strategy and disguise, IMHO.
Well said.
A lot of players and even many of their coaches seem to have a mass delusion that the game at this level somehow resembles the pro game.
Another way to look at it is this:
Q: Who is your audience?
A: Usually some 3.5 or 4.0 player who is likely not really observant and reactive to what you are doing, anyway.

LuckyR
10-28-2009, 11:39 AM
I telegraph my slice serves with a toss that goes to my right (I am RHed), however I can drop it into the near sideline and to the T with the same motion, so the telegraph doesn't actually give any useful information.

split-step
10-28-2009, 11:53 AM
Most club level players (myself included) do not serve particularly hard or place the ball very well enough of the time for disguise to be essential to our games.

IMO more time should be spent working on the quality of the serve.
Besides, despite your disguise you will have tendencies and those are more easily picked up by opponents.
My toss is the same for my flat serve up the T and slice serve out wide on the duece court. However 7 out of 10 times I will hit the up the T serve. I prefer the serve and it is more accurate and more reliable. This means that even when I see my opponent cheat a little, I will still go there and more often than not, still get the desired reply.

If you are unable to consistently place your serve in the general direction of the 4 corners willingly, disguise is the last thing you should be focusing on.
Just my opinion.

jrod
10-28-2009, 12:04 PM
So what do you think of Tennis Magazine's advice?


I recently cancelled my subscription. After reading this recommendation, I feel even better about my decision.

GuyClinch
10-28-2009, 12:17 PM
I telegraph my slice serves with a toss that goes to my right (I am RHed), however I can drop it into the near sideline and to the T with the same motion, so the telegraph doesn't actually give any useful information.

Yup. That's what I am talking about. If someone tries to take advantage of your seeming "lack of disguise" you can use that against them if your a good server. if your a mediocre or unpracticed server your location isn't going to be perfect anyway. Often I try to hit slice serves up the center line but miss to the middle. Or I try to hit the kicker out wide (ad court) and hit to the middle.. Those are two of my common mistakes. The easiest serve to place consistently for me is the flat serve up the middle.

As for tennis magazine - some of their advice is quirky but I imagine it seems more exciting then hammering the basics from the editors perspective. I mean how many "how to hit an open stance forehand articles" can they do..

Pete

Fedace
10-28-2009, 12:20 PM
OH cool, another way i can read the other guy's serve.....let me take note...

Cindysphinx
10-28-2009, 12:20 PM
I would think that varying your stance would undermine your consistency. I have been focusing hard on tossing to the exact same spot. When I do it, it works great. If I were facing the net more, I think my reference points would be off.

Cindy -- one of those people who starts off her service motion facing more sideways than straight ahead.

Cody
10-28-2009, 12:35 PM
I would think that varying your stance would undermine your consistency. I have been focusing hard on tossing to the exact same spot. When I do it, it works great. If I were facing the net more, I think my reference points would be off.

Cindy -- one of those people who starts off her service motion facing more sideways than straight ahead.

I start sideways, I believe that it allows for more rotation into the serve.

Anyway i don't worry about disguise or anything, first i got to get the ball in :oops:

Mick
10-28-2009, 12:35 PM
a better player told me to always serve to the opponent's backhand.

so my opponents know where my serve will land but they don't take advantage of what they know like running around the backhand to hit a hard forehand.

In D Zone
10-28-2009, 12:40 PM
It would not hurt to give it the serving stance a try. I don't think slightly changiing the serving stance will be noticiable compared ball toss to vary your serve.

If you can serve a good slice that kicks out wide - that's a good advantage to you. You can let your net partner know that you be ready to cover the net - pulling the opponent out for a weaker return.

I have used this time and time again in doubles - alerting my partner to watch for incoming balls towards him.

Cindysphinx
10-28-2009, 12:55 PM
^Yeah. If you want to serve wide to the deuce court to take your opponent off the court, wouldn't it be better to learn to add slice rather than fiddle around with your stance?

I have a friend who has a very good topspin serve but cannot slice. When she serves me wide on the deuce court, I have no trouble reaching these balls even though I cheat over toward the BH ('cause that's how she might ace me). If she had slice, she could yank me all over the place.

In D Zone
10-28-2009, 01:07 PM
Adding one more weapon to your arsenal is always better. You cannot stick to one type of serve especially against good returners or higher level players - they will eat up your serve all day long.

Mixing the serve between topspin and slice - even to the forehand side on the deuce can win you quick point. I have continually done it, even against 4.5 players. It throws their timing off.

BravoRed691
10-28-2009, 01:31 PM
This reminds me of something we used to/still do. Pretend you're standing on a clock face. Then start by facing 12 o clock and start serving..one serve face each hour... i.e., one serve facing 12, on facing 1, next facing 2 all the way until you're back at 12 ... ok so maybe you don't need the hours from 3 to 9 but the idea was to see where your serves go WITHOUT CHANGING YOUR SWING PATH.

So if im reading the article right...maybe the author was trying to say that if you turn a bit more to your left/counterclockwise/open up your stance or hips more (the suggested foot positioning would open up your hips and prob your shoulder more) then your serve (whether it be a slice, or flat is irrelevant) would go more to the left.

So if you are hitting a slice serve, it's not that your slice would suddenly have more "break" to it but that because your starting position is facing more left, your serve will now go more left.

I was taught that there are many ways to direct your serve. This being one of the more simplistic and easiest ways. Changing your swing path is not always the most ideal.

Or so i've been taught lol...

Br

BravoRed691
10-28-2009, 01:34 PM
It would not hurt to give it the serving stance a try. I don't think slightly changiing the serving stance will be noticiable compared ball toss to vary your serve.

If you can serve a good slice that kicks out wide - that's a good advantage to you. You can let your net partner know that you be ready to cover the net - pulling the opponent out for a weaker return.

I have used this time and time again in doubles - alerting my partner to watch for incoming balls towards him.

I agree with your comment about stances...until my hitting partner told me that i was telegraphing my serve via my stance...hehe What i felt wasn't an obvious change was in fact, very noticeable to him...
So i just hit different serves from the same position to throw him off! lol

Br

OHBH
10-28-2009, 03:18 PM
This piece of instruction is just ridiculous. AIM YOUR BODY TO WHERE YOU ARE HITTING. thank you tennis magazine for pointing out the obvious. It is like telling a golfer to aim at the green. For tennis YOU NEED DISGUISE. Aim your hips at the middle of the box so and merely adjust your pronation to hit the ball both ways. duh

Fedace
10-28-2009, 03:20 PM
Tennis mag advice isn't what it used to be. Tennis Channel's 1 minute lesson or advice is so much better. Like that advice on being a boxer when you volley. Move to the ball and punch it with shoulder in and close to the body. So GOOD.......................

OHBH
10-28-2009, 03:31 PM
Tennis mag advice isn't what it used to be. Tennis Channel's 1 minute lesson or advice is so much better. Like that advice on being a boxer when you volley. Move to the ball and punch it with shoulder in and close to the body. So GOOD.......................

TENNIS CHANNEL!!!!!
if only they did those more often. About EVERY commercial break would be nice. and then they could get rid of all those shows like destination tennis and Murphy's guide. I just want to watch tennis, not resort advertisements

Fedace
10-28-2009, 03:36 PM
TENNIS CHANNEL!!!!!
if only they did those more often. About EVERY commercial break would be nice. and then they could get rid of all those shows like destination tennis and Murphy's guide. I just want to watch tennis, not resort advertisements

They need commercials to support the channel. Money makes the company alive. and Murphy's guide is so Good that i hear it will get nominated for Emmy next year....:) that show is so Funny

OHBH
10-28-2009, 09:02 PM
They need commercials to support the channel. Money makes the company alive. and Murphy's guide is so Good that i hear it will get nominated for Emmy next year....:) that show is so Funny

I pay optimum an extra five bucks to get it. Isn't that enough? I do admit Murphy is hilarious but most times I just want to see classic matches.

GuyClinch
10-28-2009, 10:51 PM
Meh. I don't think the tennis one minute clinics are all that.. <g> The serving is a snap one and the torso rotation with that fitness guy both seem kinda useless..

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-28-2009, 11:55 PM
This month's issue of Tennis Magazine has an article on how to serve out wide. In the example given, the player is pictured with his front foot pointed toward the netpost, planning to serve wide in the deuce court.

The advice was to bring the back foot more toward the right, so that the toe of the back foot is actually farther to the right than the toe of the front foot. The idea is that you would start out pointed more toward the intended target, I think. The author acknowledged that changing your stance is something your opponent can read, but argued that being able to place the serve out wide still achieves its purpose of pulling the opponent off the court.

I'm wondering if the experts here think this is good advice, and if so, for what levels.

I do not consciously vary my stance or starting location for the purpose of hitting a certain spot. I always thought the element of surprise was important, even at my 3.5 level.

I say that because I am always greatly relieved to see an opponent who telegraphs the serve placement. I will adjust my receiving position, secure in the knowledge that the serve will go where I expect it to go. This allows me to plan what I want to do with my return a little better and allows me to do things like running around my backhand by cheating over. This is especially helpful in mixed, when the serves are coming faster.

So what do you think of Tennis Magazine's advice?

Here's what I'd do with this advice:

I'd try it out and see if it works for me. If it does, and I'm having success, I'll work on it until the motion is grooved into my muscle memory or I'm comfortable hitting it consistently. From there, I integrate into my regular service motion (toss, stance, everything). I basically just groove the motion and feel of hitting this serve, then rework it to fit into my regular game.

That's what I do anytime I'm having major problems with my serve. I go back down to the fundamentals, practice the serves on the most basic levels (normal flat serve toss, normal slice serve toss, focus on brushing, focus on hitting through the ball and pronation, etc). After that, I bring everything back into my normal motion and everything has all the disguise again and everything is more potent than before (or back to full working conditions). I usually do this for the slice serve the most. I just put the toss closer to the baseline and farther to the right, and focus on getting extreme brush and spin on the ball. After I'm comfortable hitting that serve, I practice hitting it with a normal toss. That's how you learn to hit the proper spins but with a toss of your own choosing. Granted certain serves are impossible to hit with certain tosses, but you work with what you can make out of what you have.

Cindysphinx
10-29-2009, 07:00 AM
Meh. I don't think the tennis one minute clinics are all that.. <g> The serving is a snap one and the torso rotation with that fitness guy both seem kinda useless..

Most of the one-minute clinics seem kinda lame to me. The wrist one seems calculated to hurt a person's wrist. I don't know about the serving "arrow" one. I mean, I guess if you really don't know anything about technique they might get you used to some new ideas. I disagree with the sports psychologist guy who says when you get nervous or tight you shouldn't go for your shots -- that's a guaranteed loss for me.

I think the fitness guy ought to say, "What are you doing sitting on your butt watching me talk about fitness? Get up, you lazy sack!"

Cindy -- thinking the yoga lady has breast implants

5263
10-29-2009, 07:35 AM
Cindy -
I would not worry too much about telegraphing. I would bet that most of the time, your opponents at 3.5/4.0 are not watching you, and if they were, they are not paying attention to your feet. Further, I would bet that most of your serves are pretty predictable, if you watched yourself on film.

Instead, I would worry much more about getting your serves in and hitting the angles/spins that you want than trying to disguise the serve.

I played a doubles match recently where I knew the serve was going wide, and I still could not handle it because he was pulling me off the court so much that I could not make an effective return without hitting the ball right to the partner.

Just my 2 cents.

Yes, I agree.
And as one of these guys signature says, "Everything is a weapon".
For example, I love to telegraph certain things early in a match, then use that differently at another time. I like to make a point of moving way out to the doubles limit to serve a couple of out wide serves (in dubs) , then on a game point or break point or the like, hit a hit serve down the T (or body) from the spot I've set up as my out wide telegraph. Even if the T serve doesn't buy me anything special (usually it does), it sent the message that I was not really telegraphing anything and makes the out wide serve more effective.

Looking back, I can see luckR posted something very similar and much more subtle related to tells. I use his as well.

chess9
10-29-2009, 07:41 AM
I didn't care for the foot back advice. I simply turn my left shoulder slightly sooner and press a bit harder with my INDEX finger. Works for me. I get the wide slice fairly consistently. I also will frequently hit it as a sort of a DROP SHOT SERVE. Way off pace and short angled. This works for me because most returners stand 3 feet behind the base line to return my serve. You must have a decent up the middle flat/slice serve to pull this off.

-Robert

5263
10-29-2009, 07:48 AM
I didn't care for the foot back advice. I simply turn my left shoulder slightly sooner and press a bit harder with my INDEX finger. Works for me. I get the wide slice fairly consistently. I also will frequently hit it as a sort of a DROP SHOT SERVE. Way off pace and short angled. This works for me because most returners stand 3 feet behind the base line to return my serve. You must have a decent up the middle flat/slice serve to pull this off.

-Robert

I don't change my foot position either (or teach that).

In D Zone
10-29-2009, 08:27 AM
If you guys are so worried about giving the serve away but found this tip to be helpful. You can do a couple of things. (for singles application)

1. Work on adding more pace to your shot and slice /spin to your shot.
2. Pull the opponent out wide.... next is learn to work on getting a offensive strategy. What to do when the serve is returned to ...?
a. BH - follow to the direction of the ball and calmly punch / slice the ball to the ad side. Ready to finish the shot at the net.
b. FH - normally the ball return cross court will be long and deep. You can counter this with a half volley/ compact swing or even a lazy fh slice dtl. Ready to finish the shot at the net.
c. Move to the net for a quick volley to the open court. (S&V)
d. Now if you are moving forward and ball is coming in faster. SLice or gently punch the ball while airborne. Try not to let the ball bounce , you'll be out of position as you already over running the ball (coming behind you)

3. Changing your stance does not mean that you only use this to serve wide. You can also this same stance (disguised) to serve to the mid or down the T.
Minor shoulder adjustments using this stance can solve the problem.

Warning: not an easy task - get ready to smacked every now and then (if you are playing righties- serving to fh strike zone). However, stay the course as you work on getting your form and build up more confidence.

BravoRed691
10-29-2009, 09:13 AM
They need commercials to support the channel. Money makes the company alive. and Murphy's guide is so Good that i hear it will get nominated for Emmy next year....:) that show is so Funny

I agree...I love to watch the "other programming" on the tennis channel...there is only soo much tennis i can watch before i run myself into a wall!

I wish i had the TC just so i can watch some of these "other programs."

Br

GuyClinch
10-29-2009, 10:08 AM
Cindy -- thinking the yoga lady has breast implants

Huh. Looks like a natural beauty to me don't be so cynical.

Xisbum
10-29-2009, 01:37 PM
I think (especially at the 3.5 and 4.0 levels) execution trumps both strategy and disguise, IMHO. All you have to do is hit consistent but quality shots and you will win.

That being said I don't think moving your back foot and changing your angle ruins your disguise. Brad Gilbert has a drill where you serve with a fully open stance. If you try this drill you will find you can hit serves to alot of different spots with your backfoot in a ridiculous position.

http://www.sportskool.com/videos/fine-tuning-your-serve

This is a great video BTW. Though the MTM crowd will mock me for being aware of too many videos since I am not great myself <g>

Go to 6:48 if you just want to see the open stance drills.

I just don't have an open court like these guys with baskets of balls to PRACTICE these drills. Oh BTW Brad is a good coach IMHO. On a few occasions I have been early to a lesson and have been able to practice a bit. But that's the only time. Here in NYC even if you get court time you only get three balls on the court at once in public courts. :( I should move to California.

Also the Anna Kournikova stretching video is pretty awesome in its own way..haha.

Pete

Cool videos. Some good info in there, along with Anna. Dubs your pleasure, eh? :)

Thanks for posting this.

Cindysphinx
10-29-2009, 02:56 PM
Huh. Looks like a natural beauty to me don't be so cynical.

OK, I took a second look, and they are probably real. They seem to be rather "fixed," but not so much that I am prepared to make the call.

Plus, most women who get implants seem to overdo it and get them way too big and out of proportion. She seems well-proportioned, so I'm prepared to give her, . . . um . . . Two Snaps Up. :)

Cindy -- who doesn't "get" yoga

GuyClinch
10-29-2009, 05:10 PM
^^^ Yoga is supposed to be great for your game. I want to try it out as the squash pro at the gym loves it. OTOH they don't have any good times for me.