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View Full Version : Why choose a poly?


jswinf
10-27-2009, 03:06 PM
I'm not sure I get it about polys. So it lets you hit really hard and get more spin without hitting the back fence or otherwise looking control, because it's not very resilient. But it goes dead quickly and loses tension? Isn't dead good in this instance, or do you want to be just mostly dead like Wesley in The Princess Bride? Isn't this performance like what you'd get from good old monofilament 15 nylon like they put in cheap pre-strung frames and everybody makes fun of? Is there a placebo effect thing going on with this? Or am I missing something?

Cruzer
10-27-2009, 04:59 PM
I'm not sure I get it about polys. So it lets you hit really hard and get more spin without hitting the back fence or otherwise looking control, because it's not very resilient.

I don't buy the part about getting more spin from a poly string versus another type of string. There have been dozens of posts on these boards including some from people that actually know what they are talking stating that the amount of spin you generate is mostly determined by your technique and is not determined by a type of string. I have tried several different poly strings and didn't see any more or less spin on my shots compared to gut, multi, or mono strings.

But it goes dead quickly and loses tension? Isn't dead good in this instance, or do you want to be just mostly dead like Wesley in The Princess Bride? Isn't this performance like what you'd get from good old monofilament 15 nylon like they put in cheap pre-strung frames and everybody makes fun of? Is there a placebo effect thing going on with this? Or am I missing something?

Personally I don't think you are missing anything however as long as guys like Federer, Nadal, Murray, Roddick, et al use poly strings they will be popular with recreational players. There was this guy Pete Sampras that somehow managed to win a lot Grand Slam events using natural gut.

What I find amusing are the claims that poly strings tame the power of racquets like a Babolat Pure Drive. The Babolat Pure Drive has been around for about 10 years with little change over the years other than cosmetics. Ten years ago poly strings were nowhere. Racquet technology has not changed that significantly in the past ten years that the average recreational player needs poly strings to tame the power of racquets compared to the recent past.

The bottom line is to each his own. I string racquets and put in whatever string the player wants. If they want weed eater string I will put in for them. The only benefit I see about poly strings is they are more durable than most other strings.

meowmix
10-27-2009, 05:15 PM
Some people just prefer the feel of polyester strings in certain rackets. For example, I enjoy poly in my dynamic energy, but I enjoy a quality multi in my ipex's.

ace0001a
10-27-2009, 05:16 PM
Well when you got even old fogies like John McEnroe and Brad Gilbert talking about "new technology" string in referring to polys and their ability to enhance such things like spin, I wouldn't completely discount it and say it won't make a difference. Sure technique has alot to do with it and it is arguable that those who have technique that leads to more spin, that perhaps polys can enhance it a little bit more. I think the bottom line is that you can't totally go by what others say and give it a try yourself to see if you notice a difference. Polys aren't expensive (aside from Luxilon) and so trying them out wouldn't be too much out of your wallet. I myself have been trying some out in hybrid setups and I can say I like it so far.

mikeler
10-27-2009, 05:26 PM
As mentioned earlier, durability is what I like about them. With an elbow injury, I'm back on synthetic gut with string savers and I always hope that I can make it more than 3 matches with that setup.

javierjavier
10-27-2009, 06:15 PM
I don't buy the part about getting more spin from a poly string versus another type of string. There have been dozens of posts on these boards including some from people that actually know what they are talking stating that the amount of spin you generate is mostly determined by your technique and is not determined by a type of string. I have tried several different poly strings and didn't see any more or less spin on my shots compared to gut, multi, or mono strings.
i'd agree in general if you apply the same swing then the spin potential won't be much different, BUT polys allow you to swing harder and faster while still keeping the ball in play which results in more spin.

poly's are low in resiliency to begin with so when it starts to go it's much more apparent. they lose their "crispness" and become "mushy", but in my experience no more quickly than most other synthetic strings.

i know quite a few players that actually like "dead" poly. it'll still be relatively low powered, but play softer and give you better pocketing of the ball.

kcmiser
10-27-2009, 07:28 PM
I'm not sure I get it about polys. So it lets you hit really hard and get more spin without hitting the back fence or otherwise looking control, because it's not very resilient. But it goes dead quickly and loses tension? Isn't dead good in this instance, or do you want to be just mostly dead like Wesley in The Princess Bride? Isn't this performance like what you'd get from good old monofilament 15 nylon like they put in cheap pre-strung frames and everybody makes fun of? Is there a placebo effect thing going on with this? Or am I missing something?

Those are some pretty darned good questions. To begin with, I think the term "dead" is used in two different, unrelated, ways. The first is to describe a stringbed that has no spring to it. In particular, no hotspots. In this sense of the word, "dead" is not a perjorative, and many poly users like a dead stringbed. The second way "dead" is used is to mean that the string has lost whatever playing characteristics motivated you to use it in the first place. When a poly dies, I notice balls sailing and strings moving. Others report harshness, but that's not been something I've experienced.

The second point you make is a really good one: if polys don't really provide a significant increase in spin (which many say is true), and their main purpose is to tame the power of the racquet and provide a consistent, low powered surface, then wouldn't 15L tournament nylon achieve the same purpose for a lot cheaper? I've been experimenting with tournament nylon as a cross with very good results for the exact reasons you describe (low power, consistent stringbed). I'll stick with my poly mains, but here's an interesting idea: tell you average big hitting baseliner that there's a new string out with the control of a poly and the comfort of a multi. Then put in 15L tournament nylon and ask him what he thinks. I suspect that lowly tournament nylon might do better in a blind test than many would think. Maybe I'm wrong, but I'd be interested to find out.

kinsella
10-27-2009, 09:48 PM
I respectfully suggest the original poster's view of polys is out of date (as was mine until a few months ago). Many new poly strings are available that are not at all harsh or dead. The spectrum now is as wide as with most other types of string. I still cannot imagine a 100% poly string job, but I decided 10 years ago that mains and crosses have different jobs, so that hybrids are just logical.

With my new setup, I own only two racquets, because I just don't break strings any more, while in the past I had at least three, preferably 4. I have lost no comfort since leaving my beloved natural gut and there are certain shots that just work better with poly -- forehand slice is one (a/k/a squash shot).

wyutani
10-27-2009, 09:50 PM
why choose poly?

cos natural gut is expensive.

Power Player
10-28-2009, 05:54 AM
Durability. I use full poly because I can not even hybrid. I LOVE the feel of hybrids, but every combo breaks in 6 hours.

I also do get even more spin with poly. I can get spin with any string, but the poly does not move which is always going to give you more bite. It's definitley not a myth, but you have to hit with heavy spin in the first place to see the difference.

jswinf
10-28-2009, 10:07 AM
Thanks for the feedback. My original view of polys is just ignorance, just what I've seen on the web and wondering if I should try it or recommend it to friends I string for (recently got a gamma x2.) I'm thinking that if you're not a frequent string breaker (I'm often embarrassed how long it takes me to break strings) and/or a big hitter-heavy spinner, don't see a lot of reason to go poly. I'm more a touchy-feely sort.

Spatula
10-28-2009, 10:16 AM
There was this guy Pete Sampras that somehow managed to win a lot Grand Slam events using natural gut.

Interesting point, because he uses Lux/Natural Gut now since coming back to the seniors tour.

ryushen21
10-28-2009, 10:50 AM
I choose full poly for several reasons. One, I like the feel of the current string that I am using (see sig). It's low powered and, as you mentioned, allows me to hit out and keep the ball in play. It also has constant feel in that the feel of the shot doesn't change depending on pace i.e. a heavy forehand feels the same as a volley or drop shot.

I also love durability of poly. When it is fresh and has gotten through it's break in period it is absolutely awesome for me. Even the one that I am using currently is good after it is "dead" by which I mean the majority of it's playing characteristics are gone. I am currently playing with one racquet to see when it will actually reach the point of unplayability because I usually cut my strings out around the 10-12 hour mark because of tension loss.

When you talk about spin as it relates to poly, I think the best way to phrase it would be spin potential. You can generate spin with any string as string is not the key component in spin proudction. Polys have better spin potential for various reasons. There is the fact that polys are designed to not move which increases bite and imparts more spin. There is also the composition of polys in that some of them have a textured coating that is designed to increase bite. And lastly there are the profiled polys which are not round shaped like traditional strings. Not entirely sure if this works out but again the one that I am playing with is and it seems "spinnier" compared to the same shot with a non poly string or hybrid.

I still think that you raise a great point. For players that are going with first or second gen poly, I don't get it. Too harsh and terrible life.

I for one think that it would be awesome to see companies produce multis that have some of the same characteristics as polys for the sake of comparing them.

KenC
10-28-2009, 03:14 PM
I'm not sure I get it about polys. So it lets you hit really hard and get more spin without hitting the back fence or otherwise looking control, because it's not very resilient. But it goes dead quickly and loses tension? Isn't dead good in this instance, or do you want to be just mostly dead like Wesley in The Princess Bride? Isn't this performance like what you'd get from good old monofilament 15 nylon like they put in cheap pre-strung frames and everybody makes fun of? Is there a placebo effect thing going on with this? Or am I missing something?

That's inconceivable!

jswinf
10-29-2009, 08:52 AM
That's inconceivable!

I hope that's a Princess Bride recognition.

Sublime
10-29-2009, 09:08 AM
That's inconceivable!

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

jefferson
10-29-2009, 09:08 AM
Break strings too often. THat was the reason I switched, but now I would not go back. I string a hybrid of enduro pro and wilson sensation.

Have fun storming the castle!

KenC
10-29-2009, 12:32 PM
I hope that's a Princess Bride recognition.

Of course it is, its too much fun using PB quotes!

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

Inconceivable...:)

WildVolley
10-29-2009, 03:31 PM
Polys generally play differently than multis or synthetic gut.

It is not a placebo effect. Without altering my swing, I was able to drop a lot more balls into the court with more spin than when I was hitting with a synthetic gut setup. The strings return to place with poly and they don't with the multis. There's something actually different about the action off the string-bed of poly. If you don't notice this difference, then poly isn't probably right for you game.

Also, for some of us, the poly is more durable than other strings and more cost effective. I've broken synthetic gut within twenty minutes of hitting, and I'm not particularly a string breaker.

Polys don't all lose tension at the same rate. TS Cyberflash or Big Ace, for example, are better than Luxilon ALU power for maintaining tension.

Poly has been almost uniformly adopted by top touring pros because it performs well for spin shots hit with high racket-head speed. However, it is not for everyone.

When I string for others, I never recommend trying poly to people with elbow problems or slow swing speeds.

KenC
10-30-2009, 12:48 AM
I think the real problem is there are too many strings out there, made out of too many materials, in too many guages, and that's before one starts to think about making hybrid combinations out of all that stuff. How can we ever be sure if we are using the perfect string setup? Then throw in the mind-boggling array of racquets available to use with those myriad combinations and we can only grasp that complexity with quantum physics.

I have been trying various multis for the last few months and I am starting to think about giving up and just buy a reel of Prince Orig. Syn. Gut and learning how to live with it. In other words, if I need more power, I learn how to swing harder and more efficiently. I need more control? I learn how to take a little off my home run shots and place the ball better.

In other words, at my intermediate level, I have three variables that could potentially improve my game: talent, the racquet, and the strings. Instead of trying to adjust three variables at the same time, maybe I should hold two constant and concentrate on just the one which will have the biggest overall effect at my level? For me, that would certainly be talent!

topseed
10-30-2009, 06:03 AM
I think the real problem is there are too many strings out there, made out of too many materials, in too many guages, and that's before one starts to think about making hybrid combinations out of all that stuff. How can we ever be sure if we are using the perfect string setup? Then throw in the mind-boggling array of racquets available to use with those myriad combinations and we can only grasp that complexity with quantum physics.

I have been trying various multis for the last few months and I am starting to think about giving up and just buy a reel of Prince Orig. Syn. Gut and learning how to live with it. In other words, if I need more power, I learn how to swing harder and more efficiently. I need more control? I learn how to take a little off my home run shots and place the ball better.

In other words, at my intermediate level, I have three variables that could potentially improve my game: talent, the racquet, and the strings. Instead of trying to adjust three variables at the same time, maybe I should hold two constant and concentrate on just the one which will have the biggest overall effect at my level? For me, that would certainly be talent!

well said.... :)

jswinf
10-30-2009, 11:41 AM
I think Ken C has the right idea, but he's "thinking about it." Will he really do it? INCONCEIVABLE!! I doubt if I will, too logical.