PDA

View Full Version : Coldest temperature to play outside?


damazing
10-28-2009, 08:00 PM
I was wondering what others felt was the absolute lowest temperature that they would play tennis outdoors. In my area late fall temps are sometimes in the 70s but more often in the 40s and 50s. There's a friend of mine that plays all winter long - he wears a heavy coat and gloves and says as long as there is no snow on the court he can play.

I could not play with a heavy coat because it would really hinder my serve motion. And I would be afraid of injuring myself if my muscles were too cold and I pushed them too quickly.

jswinf
10-28-2009, 08:10 PM
In Tucson I play mostly in the evening, and in the winter it's usually no problem, 50 or more, but it can get down in the 40s or upper 30s. I think it's possible to play then, but I really don't enjoy it, and I do it for fun, y'know? Likewise I'm not crazy about playing at 5:00 AM or so in the summers to avoid the heat. I can get up ok, not that I'm (terribly) lazy, but my body doesn't like lurching around at the crack of dawn.

maxpotapov
10-28-2009, 08:11 PM
And I would be afraid of injuring myself if my muscles were too cold and I pushed them too quickly.
Exactly. I know how that feels.

ubermeyer
10-28-2009, 09:27 PM
Playing with a heavy coat + mittens is just silly. If he is that affected by the cold, he shouldn't play.

Bungalo Bill
10-28-2009, 10:09 PM
I was wondering what others felt was the absolute lowest temperature that they would play tennis outdoors. In my area late fall temps are sometimes in the 70s but more often in the 40s and 50s. There's a friend of mine that plays all winter long - he wears a heavy coat and gloves and says as long as there is no snow on the court he can play.

I could not play with a heavy coat because it would really hinder my serve motion. And I would be afraid of injuring myself if my muscles were too cold and I pushed them too quickly.

I have played in the rain and the limit for tennis in temperature for me is 50 degrees. Otherwise your hands are just freezing cold and the balls dont bounce.

If you want to play something in the cold, look up platform tennis.

benasp
10-28-2009, 11:05 PM
I usually stop playing when the temperature get under 10C. And we usually go for 6 month of -10C down to -30C paying 30$+ an hour to play indoor :evil:

spacediver
10-28-2009, 11:12 PM
A thermal layer with a thin windbreaker shell can keep the core body temperature warm. In this video, it was well below 10 celcius - i'm wearing shorts, a merino wool top, a thin windbreaker, and a toque. After about 30 min of play, I took off the jacket and was fine.

http://www.vimeo.com/7275640

I imagine that if it got colder I'd need some sports gloves and something for my lower body.

dozu
10-29-2009, 05:47 AM
what a bunch of sissies.

the low limit is about 10F... yes, F as in F@#$ the cold.

wear some thermals and some gloves, you are good to go.... the first 10min maybe hell, then it's all happiness thereafter.

ball bounce does become an issue, make sure you don't let them lay on the court... put them in pants pocket so the body heat keep them bouncy.

sounds crazy? you see plenty of crazy people jogging in 10F, why not tennis.

in PA, this should allow playing thru the winter, as long as no snow..... rain is non-issue either, I have an all-nylon racket just for hitting them things when it's wet... you should see, the ball goes like a flying sprinkler head when it's soaked :) :)

GuyClinch
10-29-2009, 05:51 AM
You can play in the cold but few people want too.. That basically the bottom line.

pilner
09-26-2012, 06:43 PM
50 as long as its not too windy. I think the NCAA uses 50. Below 50 I lose dexterity in my hands.

Will Wilson
09-26-2012, 06:55 PM
Seeing as I live in Minnesota I think I can add to this discussion. The biggest issue is not staying warm - that is no problem for any outdoor aerobic sport no matter what time of year.

The real issue is that once the temps drop below 50 F the balls do not bounce normally - it really changes play. I've been tempted to try pressureless balls in these conditions to see if they bounce more normally, thereby extending the outdoor playing season.

Anybody tried that?

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-26-2012, 07:01 PM
50's is nothing as it's the norm year-round for night time temperature in SF. Thermal layer for ~15mins and I'm good to go on shorts and shirt.

However, I have played a few times when the temperature got into the lower 40's. Same story, but the colder it gets, I find it to be more and more tiring. I wonder if it's because the body is spending extra energy to keep metabolism going in colder temperatures.

Limpinhitter
09-26-2012, 07:51 PM
80 degrees Fahrenheit.

sureshs
09-26-2012, 09:06 PM
I have done 40 degrees F at night

Vlad_C
09-26-2012, 09:54 PM
5C (41F)
Don't like it, but the weather kind of sucks around here.

http://novakdjokovicfanclub.com/wp-content/uploads/Novak+Djokovic+Rogers+Cup+Presented+National+pZsnn CkGWcFl.jpg
(at the Rogers Cup in Toronto, 2012.)

bhallic24
09-26-2012, 10:04 PM
I have played in the rain and the limit for tennis in temperature for me is 50 degrees. Otherwise your hands are just freezing cold and the balls dont bounce.

If you want to play something in the cold, look up platform tennis.

ha i thought i was the only crazy one. I too have played in light rain. My low temp is freezing. If its under 32F then I pack my bags. But otherwise, I wear some knee warmers or some tights, throw on a warm sweatshirt/warm up shirt and +/- receivers gloves and I'm good to go.

North
09-27-2012, 04:31 AM
I've had frostbite (twice) of my fingers - mountain climbing. Anything much below 60 degrees F and my fingers/hands (which always sweat a little) start to get too stiff and cold to handle the racquet - not a lot but enough to make playing difficult. Even a light breeze makes it worse. Once things get in the low 50s I start sticking my hands in my pockets and I wear gloves starting below 50 - before most people feel they need gloves. Below freezing I wear mittens with liner gloves. Even playing indoors in sometimes chilly tennis clubs, I carry chemical heat packs which I constantly use to keep my hands warm.

It's kind of a drag because it somewhat truncates the outdoor season for playing tennis.

USS Tang
09-27-2012, 04:34 AM
I've played when it was in the 20s Farenheit. No problem as long as there's no wind. Hands warm up quickly. No need for gloves. Ideal temp. for me is 65 degrees. Start with sweater. Take it off after a few games.

Alchemy-Z
09-27-2012, 04:40 AM
I bought a pair of leather racquet ball gloves to wear during our winter/spring season (Starts second week of Jan) first half of the season 9:00am matches we often play in 30F to 40F.

we hardly get snow just cold weather.

but we will rotate the can of balls under the hood of our cars during play so they do not become frozen rocks..

I usually drop my string tension during that season and I will wear under armor long sleeve shirts under a nike dri fit shirt.

and often do all my warmups in a jacket.

and I already double up on socks when I play anyway.

max pl
09-27-2012, 05:37 AM
i cant play in cold weather as the ball bounces poorly.

if its cold at night and cloudy the next day, the court wont warm up and feels dead. balls dont bounce as high and overall play is worse as a result.

dman72
09-27-2012, 07:31 AM
45 is my limit, although in the fall here in the northeast the wind is generally more a problem by November than the temperature. 50 degrees is completely playable but not so much with 15 MPH winds. Open up your bank account for the indoor places.

TennisCJC
09-27-2012, 07:46 AM
I enjoy playing in cold weather. I live in SE US and summers are brutal 95 F with 90% humidity, but winters are great for tennis.

A 35F degree day with little wind is a GREAT day for tennis. I wear layers - a short sleeve t-shirt, a long-sleeve t-shirt and a light warm-up jacket on the top with tights, shorts and light warm-up pants on the bottom. A baseball cap or ski cap is good to have too.

32F is my limit unless it is a league match and then I will play in sub-freezing temps if others agree to play. I think our league rule is you do not have to play if temps below 35F.

I also bring gloves and a big pull-over if I plan to stand around and watch teammates after my match.

I play in a winter league and have played in 28F with snow in the grass around the courts. I ended up in just a short sleeved t-shirt and a long sleeved t-shirt with tights, shorts and warm-up pants. You can skip the long tights above 40F as it will get too hot - try biker's tights and shorts with warm-up pants.

charliefedererer
09-27-2012, 07:48 AM
I play tennis down to 32.

I ski to below 0.

(Not much difference in activity level, just that the balls and strings don't seem to work well in tennis when it gets too cold.)

Below 40 degrees, forget about regular pressure tennis balls.

The Tretorn Micro-X pressureless balls with "700 million air-filled micro cells" will let you play in colder temps and still give a reasonable bounce.

I like a full gut set up in the cold.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 07:49 AM
A 35F degree day with little wind is a GREAT day for tennis.

It's really not. Don't kid yourself.

AnotherTennisProdigy
09-27-2012, 07:52 AM
I don't know if it's because I live in florida, but if I play in below 60 degrees F the following happens: lowered concentration, stiff fingers, less explosive movement, and unable to read the bounce as well.

charliefedererer
09-27-2012, 07:55 AM
There's a friend of mine that plays all winter long - he wears a heavy coat and gloves and says as long as there is no snow on the court he can play.

I could not play with a heavy coat because it would really hinder my serve motion. And I would be afraid of injuring myself if my muscles were too cold and I pushed them too quickly.

Layer.

It's amazing how warm you will get just running around.

A regular t-shirt, a long sleeve t-shirt, a sweatshirt and shorts with sweatpants will be all you need when playing down to the 30's.

You'll be much more comfortable if all of these are wicking nylon/dacron sports shirts and nordic fleece rather than cotton. (The cotton retains a lot of sweat - the cold air will make wet cotton garments cold.)

Show up to the court with a fleece jacket for before and after play.

BHiC
09-27-2012, 07:55 AM
It's really not. Don't kid yourself.

Thank You! I completely agree. I have played when it was about 25 F, with a 15 mph wind. That was brutal! I would much rather play in 100 F whether than 40 F weather.

tyu1314
09-27-2012, 08:01 AM
Here in NYC the weather can get pretty low in the winter, i play in any teamperature aslong as there is no snow or strong wind, the lowest i played if probably two winters ago, like 20+ F. Of course i got frostbite after a while, because all my other parts are well covered except my racquet hand.

sunof tennis
09-27-2012, 10:51 AM
It's really not. Don't kid yourself.

Think it all depends. We once played the day after Christmas here in Phoenix and when we started it was 35; which is obviouslycold for Phoenix. However, the sun was shining very bright and there was no wind. Turned out to be fine. Woudldn't have wanted to do it with wind or cloud cover. All the years in Arizona have thinned out my blood.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 01:37 PM
It's really not. Don't kid yourself.

35 with little to no wind is more than manageable.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 02:03 PM
The balls bounce like crap. It really is not GREAT for tennis.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 03:15 PM
The balls bounce like crap. It really is not GREAT for tennis.

Then move your feet.

r2473
09-27-2012, 03:22 PM
The balls bounce like crap. It really is not GREAT for tennis.

I'm in this camp. It turns into a slice / drop-shot competiton.

Also, I think strings break much more easily in colder weather. I remember last year my buddy and I decided to play outside in ~50+ degree weather instead of paying the money for the indoor court. We broke strings on 4 racquets and had to quit (I brought 3 racquets, he brought 2).

SuperDuy
09-27-2012, 03:30 PM
15 c is the limit for me.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 03:31 PM
Then move your feet.

Youre right..i have no idea how to play tennis. Thanks for clearing that up.

I have trouble anyone would think 30 is great for tennis because it just simply is not. 65 or 70 with no wind would be my zone where i would say ..wow this is great..perfect for tennis . Not 30.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 04:21 PM
Do you complain in the wind too?

TennisA
09-27-2012, 06:50 PM
Anything before 40 degrees is a bit too much for me. When you can't feel your hands when you play, there is a huge problem.

SFrazeur
09-27-2012, 06:53 PM
Temp wise for me it's about the windchill. I've had some great tennis sessions in mid 40 degrees when the night is still.

Passion4Tennis
09-27-2012, 07:47 PM
I used to play tennis in temperatures close to the freezing point,
but that's when I was young and free of injuries.
Now, I usually don't go out if the temps are much lower than 50 F.

r2473
09-27-2012, 07:50 PM
Do you complain in the wind too?

It's better than p!ssing into the wind

Power Player
09-27-2012, 07:53 PM
Do you complain in the wind too?

Are you just being combative because you had a bad day? Reread what i said because you are framing it completely wrong.

I have played in every condition. What i consider great for tennis is obviously what you are not understanding.

Many people complained that the us open semis should not have been played. I did not, and i am guessing you were not in that camp either. I doubt any player would describe those conditions as great either. In fact djoker complained, so go ahead and email him and let him know your thoughts.

Andres
09-27-2012, 07:57 PM
As long as it's not too windy, I'm perfectly OK with 35, or even 32F. I cant comment on any lower, since my city doesn't get that much lower often.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 08:03 PM
Are you just being combative because you had a bad day? Reread what i said because you are framing it completely wrong.

I have played in every condition. I just dont consider it to be great when it is cold and windy.

Nope, I just don't care for people's excuses about various conditions. It's all about adjustments.

Unless it becomes a health hazard such as wet/damp courts, and extreme heat, then it's manageable.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 08:06 PM
Nope, I just don't care for people's excuses about various conditions. It's all about adjustments.

Unless it becomes a health hazard such as wet/damp courts, and extreme heat, then it's manageable.

Show me where i ever said i didnt adjust.

Once again, you dont really understand what i am saying, yet have decided to argue about it anyway.

Is your ideal day to play tennis 30 degrees? If you could pick one temperature, would that be it?

LeeD
09-27-2012, 08:08 PM
Born and raised in SanFrancisco, moved to 45th Ave. by third grade, wading and swimming in OceanBeach from 5th grade till I started surfing in 1962 (this was before the advent of wetsuits), I can't play tennis when it hits 80, so I play down to 40 degrees F.
Lots of winters in SF get into the lowest 40's, especially if the N winds are blowing.

LeeD
09-27-2012, 08:10 PM
Born and raised in SanFrancisco, moved to 45th Ave. by third grade, wading and swimming in OceanBeach from 5th grade till I started surfing in 1962 (this was before the advent of wetsuits), I can't play tennis when it hits 80, so I play down to 40 degrees F.
Lots of winters in SF get into the lowest 40's, especially if the N winds are blowing.
I'd love to go to the courts in 100 degree heat, break out a new can of Wilson balls, and hit serves for video. But I'd need icepacks around my neck, and a swimming pool nearby, like McNear's Beach in SanRafael.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 08:14 PM
Leed you make a valid point. I play all summer in the fl heat and humidity, and it is brutal. Not ideal conditions by any means, but i grew up in it and just deal. Ill take some weeks off and cycle and do other things just for a break, but for the most part i play through it.

If i had to choose i think id pick 30 over 99 with high humidity. But i live here for the 70 degree days that are about to hit us for a few months. That is great tennis weather.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 08:14 PM
Show me where i ever said i didnt adjust.

Once again, you dont really understand what i am saying, yet have decided to argue about it anyway.

Is your ideal day to play tennis 30 degrees? If you could pick one temperature, would that be it?

It's a nonfactor. If tomorrow's temperature is going to be in the 30s, it certainly won't stop me from playing.

You don't have control over temperature, much like other conditions, so just deal with it.

Power Player
09-27-2012, 08:17 PM
It's a nonfactor. If tomorrow's temperature is going to be in the 30s, it certainly won't stop me from playing.

You don't have control over temperature, much like other conditions, so just deal with it.

Weather is never a nonfactor in florida. I have no idea where you are at, but down here we watch weather underground like hawks. Anyway, its not the point, and i do deal with it, as stated, so i am not sure what you are coming at me about.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 08:18 PM
Born and raised in SanFrancisco, moved to 45th Ave. by third grade, wading and swimming in OceanBeach from 5th grade till I started surfing in 1962 (this was before the advent of wetsuits), I can't play tennis when it hits 80, so I play down to 40 degrees F.
Lots of winters in SF get into the lowest 40's, especially if the N winds are blowing.
I'd love to go to the courts in 100 degree heat, break out a new can of Wilson balls, and hit serves for video. But I'd need icepacks around my neck, and a swimming pool nearby, like McNear's Beach in SanRafael.

Hey I used to live around there! Cold condition is a year-round event for us, so yeah, 40s are nothing.

I've played in 100 Riverside heat during college, it's different, but if there's tennis to be played, I won't complain about it.

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-27-2012, 08:22 PM
Weather is never a nonfactor in florida. I have no idea where you are at, but down here we watch weather underground like hawks. Anyway, its not the point, and i do deal with it, as stated, so i am not sure what you are coming at me about.

I'm not coming at you specifically, I'm just tired of people complaining about conditions and other factors. Play or not play, that's it. If you're going to complain about it, then don't play. Don't play and then complain about it, no one forced us recreational/amateur tennis players to play.

Actually, it's a attitude among recreational/amateur tennis players, that we complain and have built in excuses about our performance on the court. (Too windy, too cold, too hot, not the right equipment, court speed don't suit my game, etc. etc.) But that's another discussion for another day.

Ronaldo
09-27-2012, 08:32 PM
It's a nonfactor. If tomorrow's temperature is going to be in the 30s, it certainly won't stop me from playing.

You don't have control over temperature, much like other conditions, so just deal with it.

Played in shorts, no shirt, 35 degrees. 30 degrees is tough but then if it starts snowing, forgetaboutit

mikeler
09-28-2012, 05:38 AM
Weather is never a nonfactor in florida. I have no idea where you are at, but down here we watch weather underground like hawks. Anyway, its not the point, and i do deal with it, as stated, so i am not sure what you are coming at me about.


Thank goodness for weather radars.

Metalica
09-28-2012, 08:45 AM
15*C or lower and tennis starts to become unpleasant for me. The balls becomes dead and I generally prefer to exercise in warm weather.

LeeD
09-28-2012, 03:49 PM
Perfect day today, cloudy all day, 61 degrees, not a breath of wind, top court to ourselves.
As usual, my play sucked, my partner kept yelling "yours" when it was within his forehand reach, and I was concentrating on the cutie next court who hit serves faster than the 3 players I played with.

IsnerFan
09-29-2012, 04:03 PM
i shovel off the courts and play in the snow

Say Chi Sin Lo
09-29-2012, 04:49 PM
i shovel off the courts and play in the snow

Come now, that's too much work. I'd hot-glue blades onto my Vapors and play speed tennis instead.

max pl
09-29-2012, 04:53 PM
I'm not coming at you specifically, I'm just tired of people complaining about conditions and other factors. Play or not play, that's it. If you're going to complain about it, then don't play. Don't play and then complain about it, no one forced us recreational/amateur tennis players to play.

Actually, it's a attitude among recreational/amateur tennis players, that we complain and have built in excuses about our performance on the court. (Too windy, too cold, too hot, not the right equipment, court speed don't suit my game, etc. etc.) But that's another discussion for another day.

why did Djokovic lose the first set of his semi with Ferrer at the US Open this year?
it wasnt because he's worse than Ferrer, as was evident in the last three sets, but because conditions matter.

MonkeyRacquet
10-02-2012, 04:54 PM
We're in fall and my wimpiness is showing. Im sure that if i was willing to warm up and jog a bit, I'd be fine, but for now, If it's less than 70 degrees, no thanks

Sky_Boy
10-02-2012, 08:39 PM
Perfect day today, cloudy all day, 61 degrees, not a breath of wind, top court to ourselves.
As usual, my play sucked, my partner kept yelling "yours" when it was within his forehand reach, and I was concentrating on the cutie next court who hit serves faster than the 3 players I played with.

Lol Leed.. My advise to u if this happens again is to take a medical time out.. who knows maybe u couold get lucky and get a CPR..

Ronaldo
10-02-2012, 08:46 PM
Lol Leed.. My advise to u if this happens again is to take a medical time out.. who knows maybe u couold get lucky and get a CPR..

No more lip locking in CPR, hands only

LeeD
10-03-2012, 11:30 AM
Wow, I played during the heat spell on Monday, around 88 degrees, approaching 90. Seriously, I almost suffered from heat exhaustion, hitting with my 4.0 bud who hits hard and flat. Had to drink a whole one liter Gatorate, at one time, and sit for 10 minutes in the shade. Could hardly breathe. We had only hit for 20 minutes.
Oh, second attempt at a serve, DunlopHDHardcourt balls, bounced chest high on the backboard, on a slight mishit swung at maybe 90% speeds.

Power Player
10-03-2012, 11:54 AM
thats childsplay for us down here...lol. I pray for 88-90.

LeeD
10-03-2012, 12:29 PM
Well, I grew up in the fog belt in SanFrancisco, 45th Ave. and Santiago, 3 blocks from OceanBeach.
Summers, we'd get blocks of 15-30 days without seeing the sun, any time of the day or night.
Winters, we get plenty of sun between the rain, but temps likely 42-55 degrees. Downtown SanFrancisco, or where PacBell Park is located, might be 65 degrees while the Sunset District get's to 54 by 3PM, in AUGUST.
Our hottest time, Indian Summer, is right now. Right now, in SanFrancisco, it's 59 degrees, with fog blowing in strong for a 30 degree cool off after this hot weekend.
Here in SanPablo, about 14 miles inland, it's still warm out after the 4 day heat spell, about 70 right now just past noon.

Ronaldo
10-03-2012, 02:51 PM
Never complained about the temp but when it starts to snow, forgetaboutit.

johndagolfer
10-03-2012, 02:57 PM
Coldest I've ever played in is 37 degrees at 12 midnight. We just felt like playing, what can I say.

mikeler
10-04-2012, 07:31 AM
thats childsplay for us down here...lol. I pray for 88-90.


I'll take 88-90 any day IF the rain will finally stop.

rtl11
10-04-2012, 09:05 AM
34 but sunny was not a problem at all. The sun and no wind makes huge difference.

TennisCJC
10-04-2012, 10:04 AM
I played on the side of Sweat Mountain, Georgia for winter mixed doubles about 20 years ago. The air temperature was in the low 30s but the wind was gusting to 30 MPH. The courts are cut out of the side of the mountain. So, you are basically playing on a plateau open on 3 sides with the mountain on the fourth side. On the open sides, you are up above the trees at the foot of the mountain. The wind chill temperature was around 5-10F. On one side, you could hit it absolutely as hard as your could and it would still go in. On the other side, it was difficult to get it to stay in unless you used a ton of spin and just barely cleared the net. It was kind of like the 2012 USO. This was not fun tennis but we won.

OnyxZ28
10-04-2012, 01:31 PM
Coldest tennis for me was outdoors in St Louis in winter 2007, IIRC below 30*.

r2473
10-04-2012, 02:36 PM
I played on the side of Sweat Mountain, Georgia for winter mixed doubles about 20 years ago. The air temperature was in the low 30s but the wind was gusting to 30 MPH. The courts are cut out of the side of the mountain. So, you are basically playing on a plateau open on 3 sides with the mountain on the fourth side. On the open sides, you are up above the trees at the foot of the mountain. The wind chill temperature was around 5-10F. On one side, you could hit it absolutely as hard as your could and it would still go in. On the other side, it was difficult to get it to stay in unless you used a ton of spin and just barely cleared the net. It was kind of like the 2012 USO. This was not fun tennis but we won.

Did you see a witches tit at any point during the match?

pnoytennis
10-05-2012, 11:49 AM
We played at -10 celsius under that sun. best feeling ever sometimes and you never get tired. at first it's winter jacket, then sweater, then tshirts. the problem is when you stop and the wind gets to you

Ronaldo
10-05-2012, 01:02 PM
We played at -10 celsius under that sun. best feeling ever sometimes and you never get tired. at first it's winter jacket, then sweater, then tshirts. the problem is when you stop and the wind gets to you

All Serve & Volley?

ski racer
10-07-2012, 05:42 AM
Played against a backboard in the northeast last December a few days when it was under 15F

baoshuxiong
01-14-2014, 10:56 PM
From my experience & understanding, It's better play tennis under hot than cold weather. Your body will sweat and you'll feel nausea when overheat. Thus, you'll know when to stop.

Under cold weather, however, the body 1st priority is to warm up human's ideal temperature 37c or 98.6f. Thus, you can imagine the body muscles will focus on burning fat into fuel to warm up the body.

Knowing that and witnessing most tennis injuries occurred in winter, I'd rather preping for warmer seasons for safety sake.

Dimcorner
01-15-2014, 05:38 AM
My lowest comfortable range is around 40 and up. Anything below the ball and strings feels like hitting rocks. It doesn't bother me at all to hit around 40 degrees out (weird because I have lived my whole life in tropical weather).

Nuke
01-15-2014, 05:47 AM
There's more to the weather equation than just the temperature. Wearing long warm-up pants and a sweatshirt, if it's sunny, dry and not windy, I'm good to go right down to the teens. If it's really cold, I'll put an old sock on my racquet hand, with a hole in the toe that I can poke the racquet handle through. After warming up over a few games, the temperature is forgotten. Throw in clouds, wind, rain, and all bets are off.

Thre is no bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.

Ronaldo
01-15-2014, 07:30 AM
There's more to the weather equation than just the temperature. Wearing long warm-up pants and a sweatshirt, if it's sunny, dry and not windy, I'm good to go right down to the teens. If it's really cold, I'll put an old sock on my racquet hand, with a hole in the toe that I can poke the racquet handle through. After warming up over a few games, the temperature is forgotten. Throw in clouds, wind, rain, and all bets are off.

Thre is no bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.

Can tolerate 40 degrees and up but the balls stop bouncing well after 30-45 minutes.

Nuke
01-15-2014, 07:45 AM
Can tolerate 40 degrees and up but the balls stop bouncing well after 30-45 minutes.

^ Yeah, the balls turn into rocks in 20 degree weather. You have to put them in your pocket to keep them warm.

Mr.Lob
01-15-2014, 08:05 AM
Played in upper 30's f before. Usually anything above 50F... or upper 40's with no wind.

Machspeed
01-16-2014, 08:13 AM
Interesting thread, as I started to post something similar after playing in 29 degree weather a few days ago. Surprisingly, the temperature did not bother me at all. Don't think I'd want to do that all the time but hey, if the courts dry and the wind isn't gusting, I'm in.....love the game!!!

AnaMc
01-16-2014, 10:23 AM
Hit this morning - while snow flakes were flying!

TennisCJC
01-16-2014, 01:59 PM
Mid 30s F without much wind is not bad. Below freezing and I pass unless it is a league match. I have played league matches in the 20s F with snow on the grass besides the courts.

Wear layers.

Top: short sleeve t-shirt, long-sleeve t-shirt, and light warm-up jacket. Remove layers as needed once you get going.

Bottom: underwear, tights, shorts, and warm-up pants. Remove layers as needed but stop if you reach your underwear.

Ronaldo
01-16-2014, 02:06 PM
Mid 30s F without much wind is not bad. Below freezing and I pass unless it is a league match. I have played league matches in the 20s F with snow on the grass besides the courts.

Wear layers.

Top: short sleeve t-shirt, long-sleeve t-shirt, and light warm-up jacket. Remove layers as needed once you get going.

Bottom: underwear, tights, shorts, and warm-up pants. Remove layers as needed but stop if you reach your underwear.

Hope this is a mixed doubles league

BigGuy
01-16-2014, 06:54 PM
My son and I are fine into the mid-30s. We practice several times a week in the 35 - 45 range. But add in any wind, forget it.

The balls can be an issue (referring to the tennis balls). Our hopper is full of finely-aged balls, not old and dead, but certainly broken in. At those near freezing temps, the balls don't bounce right and don't feel great coming off your strings. We have to open up a can fresh balls every session or two just to keep them bouncy enough to play.

And when he is preparing for a green dot ball tourney, we try to play with green dots, but in those temps, it's hilarious. You hit the ball, it hits the court and then just stays there like it weighs ten pounds. They are totally unusable on a cold day, even when brand new.

I know one thing, you middle-aged guys better warm up and stretch in that kind of weather, or else you will lock up like the tin man!

dman72
01-17-2014, 07:41 AM
Low bouncing balls on slick worn out courts and cranky 40+ year old backs make for a miserable experience. I will consider 45+, but prefer 55+. That's why I play indoors, and pay mightily for it here on Long Island. I think playing in the cold sucks.

Ronaldo
01-17-2014, 12:55 PM
My son and I are fine into the mid-30s. We practice several times a week in the 35 - 45 range. But add in any wind, forget it.

The balls can be an issue (referring to the tennis balls). Our hopper is full of finely-aged balls, not old and dead, but certainly broken in. At those near freezing temps, the balls don't bounce right and don't feel great coming off your strings. We have to open up a can fresh balls every session or two just to keep them bouncy enough to play.

And when he is preparing for a green dot ball tourney, we try to play with green dots, but in those temps, it's hilarious. You hit the ball, it hits the court and then just stays there like it weighs ten pounds. They are totally unusable on a cold day, even when brand new.

I know one thing, you middle-aged guys better warm up and stretch in that kind of weather, or else you will lock up like the tin man!

Microwave your balls, keep them off the cold ground, and keep them in a warm box as long as possible.

corbind
01-17-2014, 01:14 PM
50 degrees is minimum. Balls at that temp are still pretty hard and tennis is just not fun there and below. Hard on the arm and takes mighty swings. Even at 55 balls better be new out of the can.

JackB1
01-17-2014, 01:22 PM
played a league doubles match the other day and it was 35 deg. (realfeel 27) and it wasn't too bad. If there's no wind, I can do up to around freezing without much problem.

On a side note, I would prefer to play in 35 degrees than 95 degrees any day.

Topspin Shot
01-17-2014, 01:25 PM
I'll go down to the freezing mark, even if it's cloudy and windy outside. Past freezing, I don't want to play because of the risk of frostbite on my fingers and because the rubber in the balls freezes. BTW, I'm from New York, so playing outdoors in the winter is a necessity due to the price of indoor court time.