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clxtennis
11-01-2009, 06:03 AM
I've got tons of books, and I've looked at lots of web-sites and yes there are nuggets here and there, but it seems like there is always something missing.

It always feels like most of the stuff is geared for 4.0+ Not a whole lot for beginners to intermediate. More specifically, for young people learning to play.

I'm trying to get drills for your 1.5 to 3.5 level players.

What do you guys consider the best drills for beginners? What about for intermediates?

I've also always struggled for drills to do with groups. What I'm really trying to do is come up with two different practice routines. One for beginners, and one for intermediate players. Each about 1:30-2:00 hours in length.

Any advice from experienced players/coaches would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 06:07 AM
One thing I forgot to ask. If there any links to videos of these drills, that would probably be of even more help.

chess9
11-01-2009, 06:12 AM
I've got tons of books, and I've looked at lots of web-sites and yes there are nuggets here and there, but it seems like there is always something missing.

It always feels like most of the stuff is geared for 4.0+ Not a whole lot for beginners to intermediate. More specifically, for young people learning to play.

I'm trying to get drills for your 1.5 to 3.5 level players.

What do you guys consider the best drills for beginners? What about for intermediates?

I've also always struggled for drills to do with groups. What I'm really trying to do is come up with two different practice routines. One for beginners, and one for intermediate players. Each about 1:30-2:00 hours in length.

Any advice from experienced players/coaches would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

BungaloBill published here some WALL DRILLS. I think they are superb for 2.5-5.0 level at least, and maybe higher. Use the search function and you will find them. One of them has a scoring system based on how many times you can hit the ball in a set time. It quantifies control.

My favorite drill of all times is suicides. One player on each side, and one hits cross-court and the other down the line. For lower ranked players, simply slow it down, and count shots that are out of the lines if they can be hit. It incorporates movement and hitting.

That's a start for you. :)

-Robert

Djokovicfan4life
11-01-2009, 06:40 AM
BungaloBill published here some WALL DRILLS. I think they are superb for 2.5-5.0 level at least, and maybe higher. Use the search function and you will find them. One of them has a scoring system based on how many times you can hit the ball in a set time. It quantifies control.

My favorite drill of all times is suicides. One player on each side, and one hits cross-court and the other down the line. For lower ranked players, simply slow it down, and count shots that are out of the lines if they can be hit. It incorporates movement and hitting.

That's a start for you. :)

-Robert

That drill is good, as long as you have an oxygen tank ready for the DTL man.

chess9
11-01-2009, 06:52 AM
True! My best number of hits doing that drill is 55, and with a woman partner! :) She was very steady. But, we were both totally tanked afterwards.

-Robert

Cindysphinx
11-01-2009, 07:15 AM
So, you're looking for drills you can tell these players to do when they practice on their own? For two people, three, or four?

Yeah, the suicides are good.

I'm a 3.5, and I like to do these things:

1. Mark a target in the deuce corners. Make it big, like 10 x 10. Use something flat to mark the target; I use dog leashes. Players are to rally FH crosscourt, trying to hit the target. Move targets to the ad side and continue with BH.

2. One player at net, one at baseline. Baseliner's target is the racket of the net player; net player's target is the feet of the baseliner.

3. One player serves, and the players try to close the net, hitting cooperatively.

4. Mini-tennis. Players are crosscourt in the service boxes. One player "serves" by putting a ball on the net strap and tipping it over to the other side. The service box is the court, and the ball most bounce in the opposing service box (no volleys).

Falloutjr
11-01-2009, 07:40 AM
As a defensive baseliner, I love the retriever drill. The retriever stands at the baseline and someone else stands at the net feeding you balls. The feeder hits one to the ad side and you must hit the ball in any way you can. Then the feeder hits one to the deuce side and you do the same thing. You keep doing it and it helps your defensive skills a lot and being able to counterpunch effectively and reach just about anything. After a while, you can also start going to the same court twice to work on reaction time and reduce how ofter you get wrong footed.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 07:42 AM
BungaloBill published here some WALL DRILLS. I think they are superb for 2.5-5.0 level at least, and maybe higher. Use the search function and you will find them. One of them has a scoring system based on how many times you can hit the ball in a set time. It quantifies control.

My favorite drill of all times is suicides. One player on each side, and one hits cross-court and the other down the line. For lower ranked players, simply slow it down, and count shots that are out of the lines if they can be hit. It incorporates movement and hitting.

That's a start for you. :)

-Robert

Suicides really is a fun drill. I have to agree with the comment about needing an oxygen mask afterwards.

I tried doing a search for wall drills, and couldn't find the list you were talking about. Do you remember what the thread was called? Thanks.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 07:45 AM
So, you're looking for drills you can tell these players to do when they practice on their own? For two people, three, or four?

Drills for them to do on their own would be great.

I'm also looking for drills I can do with larger groups. Probably around 10.

chess9
11-01-2009, 08:02 AM
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=3537&highlight=bungalo+bill%2C+wall+drills

That is a super drill set.

-Robert

Cindysphinx
11-01-2009, 12:14 PM
OK, I'd add another drill, then.

One player stands in the deuce corner at the baseline. Other player stands at the baseline. Deuce court player feeds a ball. The other player has to get to that ball somehow and hit a shot back to the deuce court player. Deuce court player hits medium-paced shots; the other player can hit any kind of shot, so long as it goes back to the deuce court player.

After a while, switch to the ad side.

The idea behind the drill is to develop control when you are running and scrambling. It can be a bit more rewarding than suicides because the scrambling player doesn't know where the next ball is going, and the rallies usually last a bit longer because only one player is hitting on the run.

tennis_balla
11-01-2009, 01:04 PM
Sorry but as a tennis coach you should easily be able to adjust any drill to the skill of the person/s you are coaching. Changing the length, intensity and difficulty and so on. Just be creative.

Clintspin
11-01-2009, 01:31 PM
http://tennisdrills.bluesphereqa.com/#


Go to the link above and you can pay $10 per month to watch how to do a bunch of drills. You can cancel your membership at any time.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 06:20 PM
Sorry but as a tennis coach you should easily be able to adjust any drill to the skill of the person/s you are coaching. Changing the length, intensity and difficulty and so on. Just be creative.

I agree.

However, the point of this thread is to post drills that people feel are the most important drills for improving. Not just drills some guy decided to "create" in order to fill up a book. There's a big difference between what works in theory, and what works in practice.

Everybody here already has drills they use for themselves or others, but who wouldn't want to learn more drills? Who doesn't want to get better?

Like I stated earlier, I've got tons of books on drills, and yeah, they can be adjusted, but I'm curious what works for others.

Don't know if you were trying to be condescending in your post, so if you're not, I apologize if I am being rude, however, if you're goal was to be a jerk, then do you have anything constructive to add? Or do you have nothing better to do?

Cody
11-01-2009, 07:41 PM
Simple drills using a Ball Machine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPCY1PNAYqE
Just switch to backhand then repeat. :)

Cindysphinx
11-01-2009, 08:10 PM
Oh. I wasn't trying to suggest "most important drills for improving." I would have no idea.

I was just suggesting drills that I like to do with my teammates when we don't have a pro.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 09:58 PM
Oh. I wasn't trying to suggest "most important drills for improving." I would have no idea.

I was just suggesting drills that I like to do with my teammates when we don't have a pro.

Oh, that comment wasn't directed at you. I like that drill. Good simple drill. Good from just hitting straight up the middle all the time.

clxtennis
11-01-2009, 10:02 PM
Simple drills using a Ball Machine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPCY1PNAYqE
Just switch to backhand then repeat. :)

Embarrassed to admit I've never thought of using a ball machine that way. I've always thought about using it more for endurance than anything else. Set it to hyper speed, and go!

Great drill.