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View Full Version : How to deal with a HUGE forehand


crash1929
11-01-2009, 11:13 AM
I play two 5.0's who have a pretty solid game otherwise they wouldn'g be five o's. However they do have some weaknesses that are obvious to me. One problem I have in playing these two guys (I have never taken a set from them but took one to 6-7 recently) is that they both can hit a HUGE forehand. One of them is totally sick!! The otherday he hit a fh and I literally can not imagine the ball going faster than it did. I haven't been on the court with Roger but I don't think he could hit it any harder.

Anyway their bh's are not nearly as good. What strategies do you suggest to deal with these guy's fh's. I was thininking that IF I HAVE TO hit it to their fh's i should keep it low....like throwing in some slice fh's wich i've been incorporating into my game.

ahile02
11-01-2009, 11:21 AM
I play two 5.0's who have a pretty solid game otherwise they wouldn'g be five o's. However they do have some weaknesses that are obvious to me. One problem I have in playing these two guys (I have never taken a set from them but took one to 6-7 recently) is that they both can hit a HUGE forehand. One of them is totally sick!! The otherday he hit a fh and I literally can not imagine the ball going faster than it did. I haven't been on the court with Roger but I don't think he could hit it any harder.

Anyway their bh's are not nearly as good. What strategies do you suggest to deal with these guy's fh's. I was thininking that IF I HAVE TO hit it to their fh's i should keep it low....like throwing in some slice fh's wich i've been incorporating into my game.

Yea, Roger can actually.

crash1929
11-01-2009, 11:22 AM
there has to be a limit to how fast that little yellow thing goes. lol

boojay
11-01-2009, 11:59 AM
Well, no matter fast it is, it can't possibly be faster than a serve. The only difference is that it can be deeper than a serve. Whatever works in returns should work pretty well against big forehands as well. It's just a matter of using the pace of the ball and having a minimal backswing. For huge forehands that you have to run after, well, that's a different story. Those will probably be winners if you don't have the proper anticipation/preparation/footwork to get to them.

ubermeyer
11-01-2009, 12:03 PM
I haven't been on the court with Roger but I don't think he could hit it any harder.

He could probably hit more than twice as fast with ten times the topspin.

Anyway, hit to their backhands. Hit with such angles so that they cannot run around to their forehand without opening up the whole court. I personally love playing this type of player because they are so one-dimensional, they have awful backhands.

86golf
11-01-2009, 12:22 PM
I don't play 5.0's but I've played some 4.5's and 4.0's that have sick forehands and most of them hate dealing with high, deep loopers. It forces them way behind the baseline and takes angles away. Plus, if a guy hits a 85mph forehand from 10 feet behind the baseline I'll have some good options on the reply. Slices can be good, but that will allow them to step into the court and get some angles on you.

Claudius
11-01-2009, 12:35 PM
He could probably hit more than twice as fast with ten times the topspin.

Anyway, hit to their backhands. Hit with such angles so that they cannot run around to their forehand without opening up the whole court. I personally love playing this type of player because they are so one-dimensional, they have awful backhands.

To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand. The only difference is that Federer can obviously hit it more consistently and could place it better.

LeeD
11-01-2009, 12:40 PM
Obviously avoid his strike zone.
Go higher with topspin and deep.
Go lower and off the sides with biting, skidding, slice.
Drop angle when you have to hit to his forehand side.
And once in a while, let him hit his big weapon.
When he runs around his backhand to hit his forehand, time for the short angle drops followed by a deep CC lob to run him a bit, just for your fun.

dr325i
11-01-2009, 12:41 PM
I don't play 5.0's but I've played some 4.5's and 4.0's that have sick forehands and most of them hate dealing with high, deep loopers. It forces them way behind the baseline and takes angles away. Plus, if a guy hits a 85mph forehand from 10 feet behind the baseline I'll have some good options on the reply. Slices can be good, but that will allow them to step into the court and get some angles on you.

I agree, either that or a slow paced, deep balls...
It is much easier to his a HUGE shot off a fast ball than off a slow paced ball...

Fedace
11-01-2009, 12:46 PM
I play two 5.0's who have a pretty solid game otherwise they wouldn'g be five o's. However they do have some weaknesses that are obvious to me. One problem I have in playing these two guys (I have never taken a set from them but took one to 6-7 recently) is that they both can hit a HUGE forehand. One of them is totally sick!! The otherday he hit a fh and I literally can not imagine the ball going faster than it did. I haven't been on the court with Roger but I don't think he could hit it any harder.

Anyway their bh's are not nearly as good. What strategies do you suggest to deal with these guy's fh's. I was thininking that IF I HAVE TO hit it to their fh's i should keep it low....like throwing in some slice fh's wich i've been incorporating into my game.

Believe it or not, it is actually worth while to give some junk spins short and low. and mix in heavy topspin shots almost like a moonball. also hit some angle slice crosscourt like federer does to bring him in. Usually guys with big forehands likes to rip winners from back of the court, instead of coming in and finishing the point at net.

Kick_It
11-01-2009, 01:15 PM
A couple of my regular practice partners games boil down to forehand + footwork.

What usually works for me is to mix in depth and loops with short chips (service line or shorter) wide to their backhand side to draw them into the net off their weak wing and either come in to cover that with a volley or pass off a weak approach.

Service wise - mix up placement. Draw them out wide on bh side with kicks on ad side, and slice down the middle to keep them honest and from cheating to run around their BH return.

Good Luck!

ahile02
11-01-2009, 01:18 PM
To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand. The only difference is that Federer can obviously hit it more consistently and could place it better.

I've never seen high level 5.0's unleash +100 mph forehand winners....

Claudius
11-01-2009, 01:46 PM
I've never seen high level 5.0's unleash +100 mph forehand winners....

Federer's fh (and any other pros' forehand for that matter) rarely exceeds 100m ph.

Fedace
11-01-2009, 01:52 PM
I've never seen high level 5.0's unleash +100 mph forehand winners....

I have NEVER seen a 100+ forehand in the 5.0 level ever. Even 90+ is a rare event, definitely not with any consistancy

ahile02
11-01-2009, 03:28 PM
Federer's fh (and any other pros' forehand for that matter) rarely exceeds 100m ph.

Hmm. Well beyond numbers and what-not, it's pretty obvious from comparing videos that pros forehands are wayy beyond 5.0s. Just watch Fed footage from FYB. He is putting massive pace and spin on without breaking a sweat. I've never seen a 5.0 hit with pace and spin that Fed does while he's just lightly practicing.

ahile02
11-01-2009, 03:30 PM
To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand. The only difference is that Federer can obviously hit it more consistently and could place it better.

So you're telling me 5.0's hit like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPOaOiHbyTc , but not as consistent?

A 5.0's forehand isnt close to the 50% effort that Fed's hitting in that video.

ubermeyer
11-01-2009, 04:03 PM
To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand.

you are overrating 5.0s

junbumkim
11-01-2009, 04:18 PM
Just like any other counter strategy, it will really depends on whether you have the inventory of shots and physical capability to execute it. So you should choose what works for you from the following.

These guys rely heavily on their forehands so they get really frustrated either they cannot hit forehand or their forehands are not working.

1. Look for a shot preference and protect it.
Most likely, these guys have preference to dtl, crosscourt, or inside out
on a given shot. If you can successfully retrieve their shots and make
them hit one more shot (preferrably with their backhand) over and over
again, they are trying to hit it bigger and bigger. You can cheat slightly
over to the side to defend. This sort of assumes that you move pretty well
with good defense.

2. Do they go big on big shots, weak shots, or what?
Some guys can generate a lot of pace against a big shot, but they can't
generate their own pace on a deep floater. Against these guys, deep
floating slice would work pretty well. They might be really vulnerable to
short slice to their forehand. This is really effective when they aren't
good movers. Make them move to their backhand and dink it to their
forehand...Or, dink it to their forehand and make them hit backhand on
the run

Moonballing could work as well but they
might just encounter with another moonball instead of playing out of their
game.

3. Make them move and hit on the run.
One strategy Sampras used against Courier was to go to his forehand,
then to his backhand. This worked really well b/c of Courier's extreme grip
and weak backhand. You can try similar. Go wide to their forehand and
make them hit backhand on the run. If they don't hit their forehand well
on the run, you can go wide to their backhand then to their forehand.

4. Keep all your shots to their backhand...
Simple....Never hit to their forehand, lol.

Nellie
11-01-2009, 04:19 PM
Agreed with some comments above - keep the ball deep and vary the pace/spin so the opponents cannot unload. Your opponent will try to hit hard, but the challenge is to put them in position where they miss more than they make.

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-01-2009, 04:27 PM
True only hit to his forehand to open up the court and create angles for yourself.

user92626
11-01-2009, 04:33 PM
I think we can gauge how hard Fed hit by looking at his opponent's position at baseline. Fed's shots when in are usually past the service line and his oppon. stands like 4-6 feet behind the baseline to return.

There are definitely some guys at the court I play whose hitting can push other guys to back up like that. They're rare though. What more common is we all stand 2-3 feet behind the baseline and if you can consistently hit like that you are already ahead.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-01-2009, 06:10 PM
there has to be a limit to how fast that little yellow thing goes. lol

Well... When Federer broke 100, I thought that was as fast as it goes. Then I hear about Gonzo doing the same, but going higher than 101 and 106. Then I see Nadal pull 111 at Wimbledon. Then I hear of Monfils' 116 at the Australian Open. Then I see Delpo pull 90-100+ consistently on the run into the corners against Federer at the US Open... The numbers just keep going higher and higher...

I doubt your friend can break 90. 90 is like 6.0+ winner level. Almost nobody can get a 90 back if it's hit to the other side.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-01-2009, 06:12 PM
I play two 5.0's who have a pretty solid game otherwise they wouldn'g be five o's. However they do have some weaknesses that are obvious to me. One problem I have in playing these two guys (I have never taken a set from them but took one to 6-7 recently) is that they both can hit a HUGE forehand. One of them is totally sick!! The otherday he hit a fh and I literally can not imagine the ball going faster than it did. I haven't been on the court with Roger but I don't think he could hit it any harder.

Anyway their bh's are not nearly as good. What strategies do you suggest to deal with these guy's fh's. I was thininking that IF I HAVE TO hit it to their fh's i should keep it low....like throwing in some slice fh's wich i've been incorporating into my game.

Move faster, stay low, and focus on the ball and executing your stroke. All you have to do is get there. Let your stroke handle the rest. Clear your head, and focus on what needs to be focused on. Keep your stroke simple and clean. That's all you need. Oh, and hitting through it a bit helps a lot.

VilasFan
11-01-2009, 07:14 PM
What's your rating? Many great suggestions above, but do you have the skill-set to execute these suggested shots/strategies?

crash1929
11-01-2009, 09:28 PM
To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand. The only difference is that Federer can obviously hit it more consistently and could place it better.


I tend to agree with this one. fed could hit that all day the five O, much less frequently.

crash1929
11-01-2009, 09:45 PM
that one fh i was talking about was wicked. he doesn't usually hit them that fast but he is a big strong athletic 5.0 player and there are times when he puts everything into a shot and kills it. i'm not talking about a rally ball here folks. i'm talking about an all out kill shot. he can usually get most of those kill shots in but this one blew my mind it was like the matrix.

tks for the tips will study this thread for sure!

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-02-2009, 12:50 AM
that one fh i was talking about was wicked. he doesn't usually hit them that fast but he is a big strong athletic 5.0 player and there are times when he puts everything into a shot and kills it. i'm not talking about a rally ball here folks. i'm talking about an all out kill shot. he can usually get most of those kill shots in but this one blew my mind it was like the matrix.

tks for the tips will study this thread for sure!

Then why even mention that shot to us?! Kill shots don't have to be mentioned. Why? BECAUSE THEY'RE MEANT TO FINISH THE POINT! It doesn't matter how fast or slow his kill shot is, as long as he's 100% certain you aren't getting it back. Just don't let him hit that kill shot! Keep it deep!

dwhiteside
11-02-2009, 01:49 AM
Certain people, not all, at a solid 5.0/5.5 could hit a FH as fast as Federer could, in neutral circumstances, maybe 1/200 ish times for every 10 times Federer could, most likely. Get a 5.0 who's strong and has decent forehand technique, set them up against a ball machine for an hour, have them tee off every time, and physically, out of the whole hour, the hardest shot of the lot, they'll hit something that Roger can't best by much, just that one shot taken in isolation. It's just physics. They'll run into an absurd ball eventually that hits their sweet spot and they get their whole body weight into it and it's an absolutely perfect hit that they'd be hard pressed to pull off again if they tried, let alone in a match. But the difference is obviously that it happens far far far less. They're capable of it, it's just they haven't refined the technique to the point the pros have. It depends on the player, of course, but pros on the ATP tour, pros on future/challengers, college players and 6.0+ national tourney players aren't mythical beasts who are geniuses and unbelievably gifted, they're just perfected technique and are aware of how to get maximum power into the shots a large percentage of the time they hit the ball when in position. Federer is a combo of innate natural talent + the mind + the hard work and idiosyncratic training from a young age. His shots are an example of maximizing the physical capacity of the human body combined with the tennis racquet. I've seen futures players hit winners 100mph+, and college players do it too, it just doesn't happen often, the ball has to be hit in a very very specific way and there are elements of chance involved to really hit at that speed for players who aren't on the pro circuits.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-02-2009, 02:51 AM
Certain people, not all, at a solid 5.0/5.5 could hit a FH as fast as Federer could, in neutral circumstances, maybe 1/200 ish times for every 10 times Federer could, most likely. Get a 5.0 who's strong and has decent forehand technique, set them up against a ball machine for an hour, have them tee off every time, and physically, out of the whole hour, the hardest shot of the lot, they'll hit something that Roger can't best by much, just that one shot taken in isolation. It's just physics. They'll run into an absurd ball eventually that hits their sweet spot and they get their whole body weight into it and it's an absolutely perfect hit that they'd be hard pressed to pull off again if they tried, let alone in a match. But the difference is obviously that it happens far far far less. They're capable of it, it's just they haven't refined the technique to the point the pros have. It depends on the player, of course, but pros on the ATP tour, pros on future/challengers, college players and 6.0+ national tourney players aren't mythical beasts who are geniuses and unbelievably gifted, they're just perfected technique and are aware of how to get maximum power into the shots a large percentage of the time they hit the ball when in position. Federer is a combo of innate natural talent + the mind + the hard work and idiosyncratic training from a young age. His shots are an example of maximizing the physical capacity of the human body combined with the tennis racquet. I've seen futures players hit winners 100mph+, and college players do it too, it just doesn't happen often, the ball has to be hit in a very very specific way and there are elements of chance involved to really hit at that speed for players who aren't on the pro circuits.

What you should also mention is that most high level players that hit 100+ weren't actually aiming for it. They were probably just aiming for around 90, just something that could end the point, whether it be a kill shot, a hard pass, or a desperate running forehand. They play within themselves, but they aim to crank it up a bit more than their average shot (unless it's a desperate shot and they'll lose the point anyway).

Nadal was probably going for a hard 90 when he hit 111, but he didn't know his own strength (as when he broke the ball in the 2006 French Open final) and popped out a 111 mph forehand. :)

nfor304
11-02-2009, 05:01 AM
I think we need more info on the players with the big forehands.

Are they good at all types of forehands? How good is their backhand?

For example I consider my off forehand my best shot from the baseline, but my running forehand isn't great.

How good are they at protecting their backhand side? Do they try to run around lots of backhands or do they mostly stay neutral?

One thing that is always good to try against a player with a big forehand is to go wide and low/high to their forehand when serving and hit a forcing shot to the backhand next shot. Sometimes players with a big weapon like that have a less powerful but more solid backhand, and are more consistent and/or comfortable returning off the backhand wing.

Generally just mix up your shots to that side and try and keep him from hitting a set up shot off that wing or a shot in his hitting zone. Make sure when you do go to that side he's running, hitting on the stretch or hitting something higher or lower than he is used to.

35ft6
11-03-2009, 12:53 AM
To be honest, I don't think there actually is a big difference between the hugest forehands seen at the 5.0 level, and Federer's forehand. The only difference is that Federer can obviously hit it more consistently and could place it better.How about serves? You think 5.0's have serves like Roddick? Just not as often?

Federer hits a forehand harder than any 5.0 or 6.0 I've ever seen. Not just that, but harder than anybody I've ever seen at a challenger or futures. Not just that, he's hit some of the hardest forehands I've ever seen period.

35ft6
11-03-2009, 12:56 AM
Certain people, not all, at a solid 5.0/5.5 could hit a FH as fast as Federer could, in neutral circumstances, maybe 1/200 ish times for every 10 times Federer could, most likely. Get a 5.0 who's strong and has decent forehand technique, set them up against a ball machine for an hour, have them tee off every time, and physically, out of the whole hour, the hardest shot of the lot, they'll hit something that Roger can't best by much, just that one shot taken in isolation. It's just physics.How are you coming up with this? You think the same about serves? If some 5.0's served enough balls they would eventually hit one at 145 mph? Why not?

Blake0
11-03-2009, 08:06 PM
Try to keep it away from their power zone on their forehands.Loopy topspin that bounces above shoulders, slices that skid down low..either one or whichever that works. Also try hitting flatter at their body. It tends to be harder to kill.:)

5263
11-03-2009, 08:12 PM
How are you coming up with this? You think the same about serves? If some 5.0's served enough balls they would eventually hit one at 145 mph? Why not?

I had a dubs partner who got to play Sampras in a tiebreaker for winning a fast serve contest. He hit like a 137, twice, in the box, which was higher than Pete hit during the entire event. No one thing the pros do is that magical. They are more human than most realize. Just people. It is the complete game, power and control that sets them apart.

MarrratSafin
11-04-2009, 02:11 AM
I had a dubs partner who got to play Sampras in a tiebreaker for winning a fast serve contest. He hit like a 137, twice, in the box, which was higher than Pete hit during the entire event. No one thing the pros do is that magical. They are more human than most realize. Just people. It is the complete game, power and control that sets them apart.

Right.. and the consistency- the ability to hit the high quality shots over and over again in almost every point and to keep it up throughout a match.

fattsoo
11-04-2009, 02:22 PM
Low balls with slice will prob get them to hit in a not so comfortable position, and do various top spin mix with slice. This way they are not targeting one single shot from u

35ft6
11-04-2009, 02:22 PM
I had a dubs partner who got to play Sampras in a tiebreaker for winning a fast serve contest. He hit like a 137, twice, in the box, which was higher than Pete hit during the entire event. No one thing the pros do is that magical. They are more human than most realize. Just people. It is the complete game, power and control that sets them apart.I chose 145 for a reason. Yeah, I've seen results for those fast serve contests, and some of the numbers are incredible. But those people are the exceptions that prove the rule. 5.0's can NOT hit forehands and serves as fast as the biggest hitters on tour. Yes, they're only humans, just like Usain Bolt, Michael Jordan and Roy Jones Jr. Still...

By the way, did they have a radar gun there? And why do you say "like" a 137 serve? What does the "like" mean?

Jaxon
11-04-2009, 06:53 PM
When encontering huge forehands just take a step back from where you usually hit much like nadal does. And when I watched Nick Bolleriti's instructional videos, it does not say anything about slowing the ball down or hitting with loopy shots I know from experiencethat this makes it really to put away. Keep your pace and stay consistentand place your balls where it's difficult for your opponent to hit a successful shot. No matter how good your opponent is he is bound to make a mistake sooner or later. If you've tried your best to make it difficult and he is still hitting winners you jus have accept the fact that your opponent played better that day and move on. Taken from Bolleriti's video. I entirely agree with Nick if your opponent is simply the better player and is playing outstanding that day there's not much you can do.

crash1929
11-05-2009, 06:10 AM
I had a dubs partner who got to play Sampras in a tiebreaker for winning a fast serve contest. He hit like a 137, twice, in the box, which was higher than Pete hit during the entire event. No one thing the pros do is that magical. They are more human than most realize. Just people. It is the complete game, power and control that sets them apart.



I think this makes sense.

basil J
11-05-2009, 07:07 AM
I just went thorugh this last night. I played a 4.5, not a 5.0 but none the less who is a big hitting lefty that can crush his forehand down the line and hit winners from everywhere. I used angles to pull him off the court, went short and low on his forehand, pulled him out wide with angles to his waker BH side and opened up the court so he had to hit forehands on the move. I beat him easily and he was pretty ****ed saying once during a change over that he felt like he hit 2 forehands all night, where in reality he only hit 2 comfortable forehands ( for winners by the way) all night.
I also hit all my serves into his body or his BH all night so he could not get any momentum going on his returns.
I usually lose to this guy, but not last night.

goran_ace
11-05-2009, 07:53 AM
Try to keep it away from their power zone on their forehands.Loopy topspin that bounces above shoulders, slices that skid down low..

+1. If these guys are killing you with the forehand, take away the opportunities for them to hit that forehand. Play the ball to the backhand as much as possible and make them have to hit great shots off that side to beat you. That doesn't mean you hit the same spot over and over - move the ball around that side of the court. When you have to hit to the forehand in a rally, play a slice or hit a high loopy topspin shot to keep it out of the strike zone. Otherwise, only hit to the forehand side when you can press and attack.

Mick
11-05-2009, 08:45 AM
in the pro, the way to deal with a huge forehand is to hit the huge forehand first :shock:

LeeD
11-05-2009, 09:01 AM
er...
Who would I rather listen to?
Blake, all the potential in the world, none of the smarts to harness any of it..or
Laver...little short crab who figured out what everyone else hates, hits that shot, and wins a few tournaments......

TommyGNR
11-06-2009, 11:29 AM
I like using this strategy:
Start off a rally by hitting to there backhand. You want to keep hitting there until you can get them to move or cheat to that side of the court. Then hit to the other corner(make them hit a running forehand). Follow that up with a shot to the backhand corner(force them to hit a running backhand).
The basic idea is hit to there backhand until you get enough open court to force them to hit a running forehand(this way they dont get to setup for the forehand winner). Then force them to hit a running backhand(there weaker stroke) for a error or weak return.

mtommer
11-06-2009, 12:59 PM
How about serves? You think 5.0's have serves like Roddick? Just not as often?

Federer hits a forehand harder than any 5.0 or 6.0 I've ever seen. Not just that, but harder than anybody I've ever seen at a challenger or futures. Not just that, he's hit some of the hardest forehands I've ever seen period.

Radar guns "don't lie" so to speak. Sure, they can be a little off for or against the numbers but it's still pretty close. If a two bit hack like me can just drop balls and hit them in the mid 80's (one at 92...I think that was it), and that's with a gun displaying a little slow, then I'm sure there are plenty of 5.0 or 6.0 players that can hit as fast or faster. The biggest difference is the ability to get those balls in consistently, as another poster mentioned. I suck at it, 5.0/6.0 players no where near as sucky at it than I am, and Fed...not sucky at all.

5263
11-06-2009, 02:34 PM
I chose 145 for a reason.

By the way, did they have a radar gun there? And why do you say "like" a 137 serve? What does the "like" mean?

I said "like" because I couldn't remember the exact number, as it was a few years back. It may have been 145. It was the same radar, on the same court that the players used, therefore as close to dead on as it will be for comparing to what you see listed for the pros.

The guy was an exception? maybe but we had 2 others that served as big as this guy and one of them I'm pretty sure was faster. This was a 4.5 team.

crash1929
11-07-2009, 10:42 AM
+1. If these guys are killing you with the forehand, take away the opportunities for them to hit that forehand. Play the ball to the backhand as much as possible and make them have to hit great shots off that side to beat you. That doesn't mean you hit the same spot over and over - move the ball around that side of the court. When you have to hit to the forehand in a rally, play a slice or hit a high loopy topspin shot to keep it out of the strike zone. Otherwise, only hit to the forehand side when you can press and attack.

tks goran sounds good. one thing i noticed is when people say MIX IT UP! change the pace and type of ball you hit to your opponent to throwo him off. I notice if you are not careful this can backfire and end up throwing you off if you are not used to hitting the shots- I mean you can end up throwing off your own timing.

featherlight
11-07-2009, 04:18 PM
try putting spin on the ball , create short angles , and if they are weak at net draw them in with a short slice

crash1929
11-07-2009, 11:56 PM
I just went thorugh this last night. I played a 4.5, not a 5.0 but none the less who is a big hitting lefty that can crush his forehand down the line and hit winners from everywhere. I used angles to pull him off the court, went short and low on his forehand, pulled him out wide with angles to his waker BH side and opened up the court so he had to hit forehands on the move. I beat him easily and he was pretty ****ed saying once during a change over that he felt like he hit 2 forehands all night, where in reality he only hit 2 comfortable forehands ( for winners by the way) all night.
I also hit all my serves into his body or his BH all night so he could not get any momentum going on his returns.
I usually lose to this guy, but not last night.


congrats good discipline. some inspiration here.

nereis
11-08-2009, 07:57 AM
I say go to net. I've played my fair share of guys who would have blown me away from the baseline with sheer power if I had tried to go toe to toe with them. Because they're so used to hitting flat bombs, their passing shots won't be as good as someone who hits with lots of spin or is used to being attacked. The only way to win is to not play their game at all. I don't think I've hit a single topspin groundstroke against those sort of players, neither have I lost a match against one at this level.