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View Full Version : how much tougher are opens than juniors


joshburger
11-03-2009, 11:05 AM
im 16. i play in new england in the 16s and 18s with diecent success. how much harder is the open division? i want to give it a try

tennismom42
11-03-2009, 12:06 PM
im 16. i play in new england in the 16s and 18s with diecent success. how much harder is the open division? i want to give it a try
Each area calls tournaments differently, but I think you're talking about Juniors Championship level tournaments. Or you've rececently registered for the Level 2 National Opens for November. BTW, a National Open is among the higest level in Juniors.

If you're in New England, I'll try to give you a comparison. It's a very rough estimate. Consider the top 5 high school players in your state. Now add the top 15 players in your section. Now you have 15 - 20 players that would likely compete at the top levels in juniors. Of these 20, 10 will likely have 1 -2 wins (main & back) in singles, at the Championship Level, with similar or worse results in doubles. (Sorry, I just never considered New England as a stellar producer of doubles parings. I am sure someone will disagree with me.) Of the remaining 10, I would estimate that 8 of them would win 3-4 rounds (main & back) in singles. The remaining top 2 in your section would likely have 4 or more wins (main & back).

Of course, you can click on USTA or TRN rankings lists, at any time and research how New England kids rank compared to other sections. Remember these rankings change often.

Keep in mind, some kids hail from one state, but attend academies, so that really screws up my estimates.

If you're 16, get busy NOW playing everything you can. Coaches/recruiters make their decisions earlier than anyone here realizes. Always play doubles.

wilsonplayer
11-03-2009, 12:11 PM
I actually think he might be talking about men's opens? I played junior usta tennis in New England as well and played some opens when I was 16, 17, and 18. I find that the opens are much more difficult. In general, you will find some past D1 players and much more experienced players than anything you will have encountered in the juniors. While a lot of the juniors in USTA have nice strokes and hit the ball cleanly, many of them have difficulty with the mental aspect of the game. In the men's open, you will find that not to be the case at all. Good luck

coloskier
11-03-2009, 01:18 PM
Most of the top 20 players don't even play anything but ITF's and National Opens. So, yes, the Opens are A LOT tougher.

cmb
11-03-2009, 01:43 PM
It depends on the tournament, if prize money is involved then it will be much more difficult. If no money is there, then they can be really weak.

T1000
11-03-2009, 02:33 PM
The one's without money are easier and have about 2-4 quality players if that. The one's with money are a lot harder and play like 4s and 5s while the other ones are 6s and 7s. Which one were you thinking about doing, the one in Torrington?

joshburger
11-03-2009, 03:02 PM
The one's without money are easier and have about 2-4 quality players if that. The one's with money are a lot harder and play like 4s and 5s while the other ones are 6s and 7s. Which one were you thinking about doing, the one in Torrington?

maybe bloomfield on the 14th. theres not a good tournament in connecticut and the only diecent one is grande meadows 16 level 7, but its not really worth going to massachusets for a 16 level 7... so idk wel see

scraps234
11-03-2009, 03:16 PM
m0ps are all crazy good but you can find some easy wins in in jrs... i guess you could in m0ps but not as many

T1000
11-03-2009, 07:17 PM
maybe bloomfield on the 14th. theres not a good tournament in connecticut and the only diecent one is grande meadows 16 level 7, but its not really worth going to massachusets for a 16 level 7... so idk wel see

Not trying to be mean but in my experience last year I started doing what you did (playing up without any big wins or winning tounaments.) I don't think it was a smart idea and I should've stayed in the 16s instead of moving up. I wouldn't try mens opens or 18s until you won some 7s and got big results in the 6s. I was too focused on college and I caught a huge slump until around march where i broke out again. It might be different for you since everyone is different but it was the wrong move for me. I would seriously consider staying in the 16s and trying to win some before moving up. Playing up in doubles and doing some 7s in the 18s is fine but don't make the switch permanent, keep playing the 16s until you get so confident that you can go out there and win 7s easily. Just my 2 cents

joshburger
11-04-2009, 04:19 PM
ya i know, im not permantley switching to 18s and mens open, im still mostly playiong 16s, i just dont do 7s anymore, and i usually wont do mens open there just wasnt a good 16 or 18 that weekend