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drnantu
11-09-2009, 09:27 PM
I am a 3.5 player who is currently using a 320g Wilson K90. Besides playing tennis, I also do some lifting. As I get better in timing and gain more strength, I feel that I can handle a heavier racket.
My couch said that I should use the heaviest racket that I can handle which will give me more control and penentration. He recommended the Strung Weight: 12.5 ounces: Wilson K90 (9pt head light) or the Strung Weight: 12.8oz: Wilson K88 (6pt head light).
My questions:
1: Is it ture that a player should use the heaviest racket?
2: If so, should he add lead tape to increase weight or just go with a heavier racket?
Thanks.

2ndServe
11-09-2009, 09:37 PM
yes this is true. If you notice the men pros start with a heavy racket and even add lots of lead tape. Sampras had one of the heaviest rackets and also hit one of the "heaviest" balls. At 3.5 you probably want a light racket but if you plan on improving and playing better players a heavy racket will be better.

Against a strong player who hits a heavy ball or tons of spin a light racket will twist at impact a lot. A heavier more stable racket is preferred at the higher levels while at the lower levels where I see people poke at the ball a lighter racket is best. Depends on your competition and what level you're trying to achieve.

zeratul90
11-09-2009, 09:39 PM
I think it was, you should use the heaviest racquet that you can handle

coyfish
11-09-2009, 09:42 PM
yes this is true. If you notice the men pros start with a heavy racket and even add lots of lead tape. Sampras had one of the heaviest rackets and also hit one of the "heaviest" balls. At 3.5 you probably want a light racket but if you plan on improving and playing better players a heavy racket will be better.

Against a strong player who hits a heavy ball or tons of spin a light racket will twist at impact a lot. A heavier more stable racket is preferred at the higher levels while at the lower levels where I see people poke at the ball a lighter racket is best. Depends on your competition and what level you're trying to achieve.

Dont agree at all. There are plenty of pro's using lighter racquets and heavy ones too. Generally beginner racquets are very light but as far as medium / heavy racquets are conscerned its personal preference.

As you get better and have developed swings its easier to use heavier racquets which many like and others dislike. Push comes to shove its personal preference.

naylor
11-09-2009, 09:50 PM
If you have long, well developed and fluid strokes, prepare early, have a relatively fast, full swing with good timing, have a reasonably all-court game, serve well with good pace, placement and variation, so can play S&V as needed, volley adequately when at the net, and (from my own experience) play SHBH, then the K90 or the KPS88 are possible options to play with. Otherwise, you've been recommended probably the most difficult rackets for an "average" 3.5 player to use and learn / improve his game with.

Now, tell us about your game, swing, shots you play well, shots you can't hit at all, etc. (or better, post a video) and you'll get a lot more feedback.

tennis_pr0
11-09-2009, 10:06 PM
Nadal plays with an 11 oz racquet, Federer plays with a 12.6 oz racquet. Why? They have different styles, and the racquet they play with fits their game. If "playing with the heaviest racquet you can handle" was good advice, then every professional tennis player would be playing with a Sampras like racquet. Some players prefer a heavy racquet that will plow through every ball while other prefer one that's more swing friendly easier to generate top spin with. Basically, like I said, it comes down to what racquet fits YOUR game the best. The best way you will determine this is by demoing a variety of racquets and then you will have a good reference to what racquet fits your game well.

mawashi
11-09-2009, 10:17 PM
I am a 3.5 player who is currently using a 320g Wilson K90. Besides playing tennis, I also do some lifting. As I get better in timing and gain more strength, I feel that I can handle a heavier racket.
My couch said that I should use the heaviest racket that I can handle which will give me more control and penentration. He recommended the Strung Weight: 12.5 ounces: Wilson K90 (9pt head light) or the Strung Weight: 12.8oz: Wilson K88 (6pt head light).
My questions:
1: Is it ture that a player should use the heaviest racket?
2: If so, should he add lead tape to increase weight or just go with a heavier racket?
Thanks.

The AK90 n the K90 might actually the same frame but customized for different weights at the factory.
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=114225

Adding lead should do the trick instead of getting a new K90.

mawashi

GuyClinch
11-09-2009, 10:41 PM
Nadal plays with an 11 oz racquet, Federer plays with a 12.6 oz racquet. Why? They have different styles, and the racquet they play with fits their game. If "playing with the heaviest racquet you can handle" was good advice, then every professional tennis player would be playing with a Sampras like racquet

Where are you getting that "information" - if its just the KIND of racquets they use - that means nothing.

Secondly - its not clear what "handle" means. I interpret as swinging the heaviest racquet that allows you to come fairly close to your 'max' swing speed with a very light racquet.

A heavier racquet has several physical advantages for a stronger fitter player. And if you can swing it at something very close to the speed you can swing a granny stick its very much worth it.

A weaker player OTOH can't generate any sort of racquet speed with a racquet that's too heavy for them and they should stick with ligher racquets. Without some objective testing though this relationship comes down to feel.

And this is what people mean by "handle" - its very advice, IMHO. That being said almost no human being can swing racquets that are 14oz as fast as they need too.. Even the pros use racquets under 14. For a 3.5 unless your quite strong I would aim for something under 13 or 12. Just test some and pick the ones you feel you can generate good swing speed with.

Pete

volusiano
11-10-2009, 03:10 AM
At least heavier headlight rackets are better for tennis elbow compared to lighter head heavy rackets.

some6uy008
11-10-2009, 03:19 AM
Use what's best for you, simple as that.

SystemicAnomaly
11-10-2009, 06:18 AM
Dont agree at all. There are plenty of pro's using lighter racquets and heavy ones too. Generally beginner racquets are very light but as far as medium / heavy racquets are conscerned its personal preference.

As you get better and have developed swings its easier to use heavier racquets which many like and others dislike. Push comes to shove its personal preference.

Caveat: Those personal preferences may be hazardous to your shoulder or arm health! For anyone (even 3.5 players) who deals with ball impacts that are moderate to hard, lighter racquets may be delivering excessive shock to the shoulder/arm. For some it may take 2-3 years (or more) for that excessive shock to make itself known.

However, racquets in the 11-12 oz (strung) range may be fine (as long as the swingweight is not too low). Are there any pros out there using racquets that are less than 11.3 oz (strung)? I believe that the stock version of Rafa's racquet is 11.3 oz. Does anyone know for sure if he is really using the stock racquet weight. It is possible that he is using something a bit heavier with a paint job -- this seems to be a widespread practice among the pros.

Something else to consider is that Rafa's shoulder & arms appear to be much bigger/stronger than that of the average tennis player. It will be interesting to see if he makes it to 30 without some sort of rotator cuff (or other shoulder) injury.

Nanshiki
11-10-2009, 06:22 AM
You should use a racquet closer to the "heavy" side of the scale, but you should pay more attention to your preferences than some arbitrary number.

Heavier racquets are better for flatter-hitting power players. Lighter racquets are better for spinny, loopy grinders and counter-punchers.

charliefedererer
11-10-2009, 06:26 AM
I am a 3.5 player who is currently using a 320g Wilson K90. Besides playing tennis, I also do some lifting. As I get better in timing and gain more strength, I feel that I can handle a heavier racket.
My couch said that I should use the heaviest racket that I can handle which will give me more control and penentration. He recommended the Strung Weight: 12.5 ounces: Wilson K90 (9pt head light) or the Strung Weight: 12.8oz: Wilson K88 (6pt head light).
My questions:
1: Is it ture that a player should use the heaviest racket?
2: If so, should he add lead tape to increase weight or just go with a heavier racket?
Thanks.

Tennis players are prone to overuse injuries.
And its not just the pros. Look at the health and fitness site to see all the cases of tennis elbow, sore shoulders and bad wrists.

I take it you intend on practicing a lot, hitting thousands of balls of balls as you continue to develop. (Agassi's dad made him hit 2500 balls a day to reach the 1,000,000 balls a year figure.)

The mass in a heavier frame disperses the shock waves better as the racquet bashes the ball with all the strength you can muster with each shot.
How the frame is constructed will infuence its ability to disperse shock. If the frame is very stiff (pure graphite) more of the shock waves will be transmitted to your arm, putting you at a higher risk for an overuse injury.
Your K90 is composed of about 20% Kevlar fibers, with Kevlar being very strong (bulletproof vest strong) but flexible (Kevlar strings). Your PS88 has less Kevlar, but its still in there despite Wilson not mentionioning it (Pro Tour 630's amazing autopsy of a cracked frame earlier this year http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=227312&highlight=ps88&page=156). (Other companies use other materials.) And all of the fibers are laid out and glued together with epoxy. So how your frame is made inflences how well it disperses shock. And yes, it certainly is much more than just a matter of adding more lead to increase the weight.

So you do have two of the better frames out there to avoid overuse injury, obviously with the caveat that you are strong enough to handle them, and continue to do your thrower's exercises: www.asmi.org/SportsMed/media/thrower10.swf

(Interestingly Wilson's new BLX Tour 90 is being marketed as having basalt and other characteristics to better disperse shock. Will this work, or is it more marketing hype than science?)

crash1929
11-10-2009, 06:27 AM
i use a babloat pure drive +. four or five years old at 10.6 oz. (its what it says on the stick, not sure how much the luxilon weighs). I also use a dampner but no overgrip.

any other advanced player use this light of a racquet? just curious. tks.

zeratul90
11-10-2009, 06:39 AM
i use a babloat pure drive +. four or five years old at 10.6 oz. (its what it says on the stick, not sure how much the luxilon weighs). I also use a dampner but no overgrip.

any other advanced player use this light of a racquet? just curious. tks.

The weight on the stick is usually the unstrung weight, stringing it usually adds about ~.5oz. I'm not sure how much a dampener weighs but i don't think it would be that significant

charliefedererer
11-10-2009, 06:45 AM
I am a 3.5 player who is currently using a 320g Wilson K90. Besides playing tennis, I also do some lifting. As I get better in timing and gain more strength, I feel that I can handle a heavier racket.
Thanks.

Since you sound like a determined tennis player, I thought it important that your read this, because it explains how vitally important it is to do exersises that strenghthen the muscles that have to "put on the brakes" and stop the forward motion of throwing your heavy racquet so violently at ball, and not letting go:

"Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Blade Stabilization

When you talk about tennis and the shoulder the first thing that likely comes to mind is the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is important in tennis, but often times strength imbalances exist within the rotator cuff that can lead to injury. Most notably, tennis players tend to be weak in the muscles that externally rotate the shoulder. External rotation is an outward rotation and is the opposite of the shoulder motion players make when they serve or hit a forehand. To improve strength of the external rotators you can perform the exercises described in this section of the web page. This exercise should be performed with the dominant arm, but should really be performed with both arms if time permits.

Not many people think of the upper back when considering how to strengthen and protect the shoulder. But try this simple drill. Place your hand on the shoulder blades of a player and ask him to raise his arms. Can you feel the shoulder blades move? Shoulder movement is very complex and involves movement of the shoulder blade as well as the actual shoulder joint itself. Weakness in the upper back muscles that stabilize the shoulder blades can cause the shoulder to function improperly and may actually contribute to shoulder pain. Exercises that train the stabilizers of the shoulder blade can help tennis players optimize performance and avoid shoulder injury.

Exercise: Standing External Rotation with Elastic Band
Exercise: Straight Arm Rowing"
-http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=114707&itype=7418

Thus, while it may seem counterintuitive to strengthen muscles that aren't going to make you hit the ball harder, it's vital to have those muscles strong to prevent injury. www.asmi.org/SportsMed/media/thrower10.swf

charliefedererer
11-10-2009, 07:09 AM
Nadal plays with an 11 oz racquet, Federer plays with a 12.6 oz racquet. Why? They have different styles, and the racquet they play with fits their game. If "playing with the heaviest racquet you can handle" was good advice, then every professional tennis player would be playing with a Sampras like racquet. Some players prefer a heavy racquet that will plow through every ball while other prefer one that's more swing friendly easier to generate top spin with. Basically, like I said, it comes down to what racquet fits YOUR game the best. The best way you will determine this is by demoing a variety of racquets and then you will have a good reference to what racquet fits your game well.

Nadal by the way, does lead up his racquet:

"Nadal's racquets are mass produced ones - their retail price is 199 euros -, but Rafa is Babolat's 'flagship' and they have a department that deals exclusively with customizing them for him, the usual practice with professional players. In the Mallorcan's case, they add 15 grams of lead to weight and balance the racquet precisely to his taste. Including the strings, which add on about 15 grams, one of Nadal's racquets weighs between 330 and 340 grams, according to Xavi Segura, his usual racquet stringer, who has slaved away at hundreds of tournaments."
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=196021

335 grams= 11.8 ounces

So although you are right that he and other players may use somewhat lighter racquets, 11 and a half ounces is not exactly light. And clearly he has worked hard to develop massive forearm muscles that should better prevent tennis elbow than all but a few tennis players. But even his arm is subject to the more jarring impact of that stiff frame.

sureshs
11-10-2009, 07:18 AM
Swingweight is more important. Many pros are in the 350 range, including Fed and Nadal. I think club players are better off in the 320s and 330s.

mike53
11-10-2009, 07:52 AM
My couch said that I should use the heaviest racket that I can handle which will give me more control and penentration. He recommended the Strung Weight: 12.5 ounces: Wilson K90 (9pt head light) or the Strung Weight: 12.8oz: Wilson K88 (6pt head light).


If my coach recommended the K90 for me, I would just go out and order it. If I still needed more weight, I would add it. I use steel washers taped to my 10.5 oz racquets but lead is OK too.

LuckyR
11-10-2009, 08:18 AM
Light racquets are built because the manufacturers know that the majority of racquets are purchased without demoing the racquet. Light sticks feel powerful, manuverable and stable when swung in the aisle of the store. They drive up racquet sales.

tennis_pr0
11-10-2009, 08:19 AM
Did someone just ask if any other players use a babolat pure drive (10.6 oz)? Well, about 25 professional touring players sue this racquet, to answer your question. According to some advice on this post, they are all using the wrong racquet because they are string enough to swing a heavier racquet. This advice is ridiculous. Many players use mid range/lighter racquets and that is perfectly fine, anyone who tells you differene has no idea what they're talking about.

jms007
11-10-2009, 08:59 AM
You see posts of pro specs everyone now and then, and it seems like most using anything around the 12 oz.-13 oz. range. That should you tell you that a racquet like that is stable enough to handle pace you're not going to face at your level. It seems for anyone between 3.0-5.0 level, an 11-12 oz. should be fine. Heaviest racquet you can "handle", shouldn't mean just something you can swing comfortably in rallies. To me it should be one that does not tire you out during the course of a match and won't slow down your reaction time under pressure.

sureshs
11-10-2009, 09:03 AM
Did someone just ask if any other players use a babolat pure drive (10.6 oz)? Well, about 25 professional touring players sue this racquet, to answer your question. According to some advice on this post, they are all using the wrong racquet because they are string enough to swing a heavier racquet. This advice is ridiculous. Many players use mid range/lighter racquets and that is perfectly fine, anyone who tells you differene has no idea what they're talking about.

If you think pro players use 10.6 (11.2 strung), you are totally mistaken. They lead it up to at least 12 oz. There are maybe 1 or 2 exceptions in the 11.7 range. The SW is usually in the 350s.

SplitStepper
11-10-2009, 09:14 AM
Did someone just ask if any other players use a babolat pure drive (10.6 oz)? Well, about 25 professional touring players sue this racquet, to answer your question. According to some advice on this post, they are all using the wrong racquet because they are string enough to swing a heavier racquet. This advice is ridiculous. Many players use mid range/lighter racquets and that is perfectly fine, anyone who tells you differene has no idea what they're talking about.


Wow. I've strung for some pro players and all that were using a stock racquet with less than 11oz. had it built up HEAVILY with lead tape. You should take some courses in racquet customization. What you will find is that there are clever ways to hide the lead tape (under the grommet, under the grip). There have been a few threads that discuss the Nadal set-up and of course, it had plenty of lead tape. Lite racquets are meant for either tiny kids or old ladies.

TENNISSLAVE
11-10-2009, 09:25 AM
i have experiemented a lot the last 4 years in terms of weights and balance on my frames.. for me , i am 210 lbs and 6 foot 2 and pretty much a stud :) the heavier polarized set ups seem to work better for me on clay while indoors or on faster hard courts a slightly scaled down version of the claycourt setup helps me .

i guess it boils down to having time a resources to tinker back and forth util you get a feel and result you like.

2ndServe
11-10-2009, 10:43 AM
lol you guys should never go with the off the rack stats for rackets the pros use, you really shouldn't even assume pros are using whatever racket they advertise. Basically every pro racket I've seen has been customized to some degree and they were never customized to be lighter. It all depends on your game and ability.

If you're old and weaker and your shots aren't going to change or you exclusively play doubles go with a lighter racket. If you're younger yes playing with a heavier racket will at the moment slow some of your swing speed. Guess what it's like lifting weights, 180lbs was once heavy for me but not so much anymore same with a heavy racket. In the long run a heavy racket will make you stronger and enable you to hit a heavier ball vs. a lighter racket.

LeeD
11-10-2009, 11:28 AM
I think it comes down to the style you hit.
Guys who need and try to swing out at everything tend to use lighter weight rackets. Guys who block a few, slice a few, possibly need heavier rackets.
You know short swings promote light big rackets, while long loopy fast strokes normally gets helped by heavier rackets that are smaller and more aero.
Use what you want.
Mfil 200 around 12.4 oz unstrung, 18x20 pattern, 15 gauge nylon at 63 lbs., and it gets to the ball just fine up to 5.5 levels.
Since I hardly every get to play even 5.0's, it's just fine.

GuyClinch
11-10-2009, 01:49 PM
Guys who need and try to swing out at everything tend to use lighter weight rackets. Guys who block a few, slice a few, possibly need heavier rackets.
You know short swings promote light big rackets, while long loopy fast strokes normally gets helped by heavier rackets that are smaller and more aero.

I think you contradict your self with these two sentences - but I agree with he second one. Heavier racquets are good if you have fundamentally sound strokes - and you are a man.

How heavy that is varies with individual strength levels though. I think its safe to say men shouldn't be using those 8.6 ounce granny sticks even if they are dinker.

For most guys around 11 ounces is good - up to 13 depending on strength and skill, IMHO.

Pete

LeeD
11-10-2009, 02:18 PM
Maybe not so much a contridiction as a different way to look at it.
For better level players, big fast swings need small heavy rackets.
For better level players, controlled shorter swings generally need bigger lighter rackets.
For the rest of us, short old folks swings need big light rackets.
And also, young strong studs can use heavier, smaller headed rackets.
So it's not quite so simple, if you analyze all the data and figure in different players and markets, likes and dislikes, opponent ball speeds and overall goals.

ms87
11-10-2009, 03:01 PM
dont use a k90 or k88.

use a more reasonable racquet and you can always add lead tape. as someone who works at a tennis store, I can tell you that new players who use k90's and the like are clowns.

fruitytennis1
11-10-2009, 04:13 PM
Anyone who hasnt played for like 2+ years or more using those rackets.... Small headsize there i suggest you try 95 first.(edit) infact try100 first

tennis_pr0
11-10-2009, 04:39 PM
Let me sum up every post in this thread in just one, simple sentence. Use the racquet that feels the best to you.

All this talk about this pro adds this much weight and that pro adds that much weight is all useless. Like I said before, and this goes out to the original poster, demo some racquets and get a feel for what racquet does what the best. Build a reference of all these racquets, compare them and then determine which one fits your game the best. It is as simple as that.

Ripper014
11-10-2009, 04:44 PM
Anyone who hasnt played for like 2+ years or more using those rackets.... Small headsize there i suggest you try 95 first.(edit) infact try100 first

Just back after 15 years... and was using my PS 6.0 85 and Dunlop 200g's. I still really enjoy hitting with them but was in search of something new and finally settled on the Tour 90. I have all my frames well weighted with lead taped, I like the stability in the racket the weight provides. I have a long fast stroke which is how I generate my spin and speed. I have always found anything 95 and larger was hard for me to control. I guess my swing speeds have come down because I seem to be able to handle my PS 6.1 95 much better now.

We can generalize what is best suited to what kind of player but in the end it is that tactile feel between a person and the racket that will ultimately decide what you will use.

paulfreda
11-10-2009, 04:47 PM
i use a babloat pure drive +. four or five years old at 10.6 oz. (its what it says on the stick, not sure how much the luxilon weighs). I also use a dampner but no overgrip.

Any other advanced player use this light of a racquet? just curious. tks.

Well the #1 player at the national level here in Thailand uses a PD.
He's a big guy and hits with massive amounts of spin but very low trajectories on the ball [no looping it like Nadal].

Tweener frames need to be hit with more spin. Very hard to play flat with them and keep the ball in court.

GuyClinch
11-10-2009, 10:12 PM
Let me sum up every post in this thread in just one, simple sentence. Use the racquet that feels the best to you.

Actually this is a problem. People just buy the lightest racquet they can find because it feels "best to them." <g>

paulfreda
11-11-2009, 12:03 AM
Actually this is a problem. People just buy the lightest racquet they can find because it feels "best to them." <g>

EXACTLY !

What is best is often not what feels good at first.
At least for beginners.
This is true for acquiring almost any sophisticated skill.
There are exceptions of course, but what feels best or
what is "natural" is quite often the wrong choice.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-11-2009, 01:25 AM
I am a 3.5 player who is currently using a 320g Wilson K90. Besides playing tennis, I also do some lifting. As I get better in timing and gain more strength, I feel that I can handle a heavier racket.
My couch said that I should use the heaviest racket that I can handle which will give me more control and penentration. He recommended the Strung Weight: 12.5 ounces: Wilson K90 (9pt head light) or the Strung Weight: 12.8oz: Wilson K88 (6pt head light).
My questions:
1: Is it ture that a player should use the heaviest racket?
2: If so, should he add lead tape to increase weight or just go with a heavier racket?
Thanks.

Your coach is crazy. Not everyone should be using Wilson's big guns! A 3.5 player shouldn't be messing with that stuff. Adding lead is always the way to go unless you find a base frame that is better for your game, which is quite rare once you've decided on a stick you like.

The heavier the racket, the better. It's an undeniable fact.

Also, it takes very little strength to wield any racket if your technique is solid enough to handle a racket at that level. 12.5 ounces is actually quite light. :shock:

I believe that the stock version of Rafa's racquet is 11.3 oz. Does anyone know for sure if he is really using the stock racquet weight.

HAHAHAH! Why even ask that question?! His specs have been posted up before! Of course he leads it up. 9 grams in the head and 2 in the buttcap if memory serves me well. Polarized setup.

SystemicAnomaly
11-11-2009, 06:37 AM
...

HAHAHAH! Why even ask that question?! His specs have been posted up before! Of course he leads it up. 9 grams in the head and 2 in the buttcap if memory serves me well. Polarized setup.

If true, good to know. Guess I don't read as many threads as you do. It doesn't seem to be common knowledge since so many are saying that Rafa uses an 11 oz racket when it is really closer to 11.7 oz if what you say is true.

Power Player
11-11-2009, 08:27 AM
Swingweight is more important. Many pros are in the 350 range, including Fed and Nadal. I think club players are better off in the 320s and 330s.

I agree. SW is the secret. Most pros are ABOVE the 350 range though. I use a SW of 345 and it has improved my game. My racquet is 116. ozs, so not too bad. You have to get used to the timing of it, but it is well worth it.

Low swingweights hurt my game and timing for a while. I thought heavy sticks were best, so I was more focused on something above 12ozs. I had 12oz sticks with a low swingweight and it just did not work out that well. So I would say to try the highest swingweight you can instead of the highest static weight.

And yes, Rafa's stick has a Swingweight of 355 and is considered to be light for the Pro tour. His static weight is 11.8. That is very light for a pro racquet.

LeeD
11-11-2009, 09:44 AM
Rafa chooses to swing fully on almost every incoming ball, including fast first serves, he doesn't volley well, and needs a sorta light racket. Of course, he hits hard with the headweight added.
Players like Haas who can also hit hard, but chooses to block lots of shots, chooses to volley a lot, normally use heavier, thos headlighter rackets.

sureshs
11-11-2009, 09:54 AM
I agree. SW is the secret. Most pros are ABOVE the 350 range though. I use a SW of 345 and it has improved my game. My racquet is 116. ozs, so not too bad. You have to get used to the timing of it, but it is well worth it.

Low swingweights hurt my game and timing for a while. I thought heavy sticks were best, so I was more focused on something above 12ozs. I had 12oz sticks with a low swingweight and it just did not work out that well. So I would say to try the highest swingweight you can instead of the highest static weight.

And yes, Rafa's stick has a Swingweight of 355 and is considered to be light for the Pro tour. His static weight is 11.8. That is very light for a pro racquet.

I think his static weight is 12 oz.

Power Player
11-11-2009, 10:40 AM
It may be. I leaded mine up and it was 12.1 with the SW at 345 (leather gripped though) so I would imagine his would probably be 12 also. Still - a light racquet for a pro player.

rk_sports
11-11-2009, 01:42 PM
My personal experience is that ... lighter racquet is fine when playing with players who don't hit too hard/heavy or serve too hard. Once you face someone who hits real heavy/hard or serve hard, its become really hard to counter that incoming force with a light racquet! I would hit the fences trying to counter the pace (lack of control). You can slice but to hit a counter topspin, I have to use so much of my energy. Using a heavier one, there is help in taking that pace and returning it.
Yes, it will make you sore sooner than if you were using a lighter one. (For this, I'm doing those stretch band exercises)