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JennyS
11-10-2009, 05:28 PM
Nothing can top this:

My friend, who knew nothing about tennis, wanted to watch me play a little bit. When I missed a couple of serves, she told me to stand closer to the net. When I told her how that's not the correct way to serve, she scolded me saying "but you're not a professional." She also said the best way to practice groundstokes was to hit the ball against the fence. LOL!

Top that!

Kenny022593
11-10-2009, 06:08 PM
swing your racquet slower on second serves

Falloutjr
11-10-2009, 06:11 PM
I remember when I first started my coach told me 2hbh was better than 1hbh. What a noob!

Wes_Loves_Dunlop
11-10-2009, 06:16 PM
the worst advice i ever got was to swing slower on second serves

XLes paulO
11-10-2009, 06:55 PM
I herd Someone once said hit your volly like your forehand

GuyClinch
11-10-2009, 09:42 PM
Meh. Swinging slower on second serves works if your a dinker - and hitting it long. So that's why you hear that advice.

USERNAME
11-10-2009, 09:45 PM
Get the ball over the net... My friends little sis told me that, cute yet annoying lol!

maverick66
11-10-2009, 10:00 PM
Get the ball over the net... My friends little sis told me that, cute yet annoying lol!

I hit 90-95% forehands one day in a practice match. A little kid watching us asked me if I could hit a backhand. I told him i could and he wanted me to prove it. I proceeded to launch a ball over the fence and into a playground with a backhand on purpose. He just shrugged and said I would never hit a backhand either if mine was that bad. Sometimes little kids make you laugh.


as for worst advice ever that would be from my dad. When I was in early juniors he told me to just hit for the lines as hard as I could because the other player wouldnt be able to get it back.:)

Vyse
11-10-2009, 10:06 PM
to hit with more pace (coming from someone who consistently hit the ball long trying to destroy it everytime)

papa
11-11-2009, 07:26 AM
I remember when I first started my coach told me 2hbh was better than 1hbh. What a noob!

Well, I wouldn't consider that bad advice because, depending on age and so forth, its easier to hit a 2HBH for most people. Many females and kids, for example, struggle trying to hit a one hander because strength becomes an issue also.

TnTBigman
11-11-2009, 07:35 AM
When I get unsolicited advise from lower level players I tell em off immedieatly in a polite, respectful way. "Man, I've been playing better tennis much longer than you have." Consultation sessions stops right there.

BullDogTennis
11-11-2009, 07:39 AM
Meh. Swinging slower on second serves works if your a dinker - and hitting it long. So that's why you hear that advice.

thats not bad advice....swinging slower on a second serve when you first start is a good idea....no beginner can swing harder on a second serve and control it...

the advice i got on this was "its better to swing harder on a second serve, but at this point in time its better to just work on mechanics and getting it in with a slower swing."

LeeD
11-11-2009, 08:26 AM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

Djokovicfan4life
11-11-2009, 09:00 AM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

Maybe weights weren't right for you, but 135 is very low for your height.

LeeD
11-11-2009, 09:35 AM
Well, I played 3 years of high school football, was starting OLB and tight end, for our AAA SanFrancisco Championship team my junior and senior years....at about 20 lbs under that. And I was shorter.
3 springs of varsity basketball also, but I wasn't the regular starter..:cry:
I lost to a 6'3" about 155lbs., RussellSimpson in '78. He was skinny too.
Nowadaze, I think the ability to retreive equals the ability to hit hard big shots in tennis. Wasn't Federer earlier this year like 6' and 150lbs.??

Rambler124
11-11-2009, 09:54 AM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

http://www.fiveguys.com/home.aspx

You eat this stuff it makes your drop shots have some real substance to em.

Eat a meal, brah.

LeeD
11-11-2009, 09:59 AM
:):)
Too bad I live in the SanFranciscoBayArea, none of thems around.
However, I managed to spend about $6 each time, easily over 800 meals at McDonalds since the boot in '06, and still weigh a fat 148 at 60 years old.
Too skinny? Maybe. But till I was 35, never weighed over 135.
Nice to see the opposition stand 4' behind the baseline when my first serve is going in.

USERNAME
11-11-2009, 11:01 AM
I hit 90-95% forehands one day in a practice match. A little kid watching us asked me if I could hit a backhand. I told him i could and he wanted me to prove it. I proceeded to launch a ball over the fence and into a playground with a backhand on purpose. He just shrugged and said I would never hit a backhand either if mine was that bad. Sometimes little kids make you laugh.


as for worst advice ever that would be from my dad. When I was in early juniors he told me to just hit for the lines as hard as I could because the other player wouldnt be able to get it back.:)

It was mostly funny but still annoying cause she told me it after I lost in the qtrs of a national. She shoulda said it b4, I might have done better!

Mick
11-11-2009, 12:48 PM
there's this guy that i used to play doubles with. he would always criticize me whenever i missed a volley. he would say, "you need to hit it like this" but the crazy thing is he made a lot more volley errors than i do :shock:

i guess he doesn't practice what he preaches.

Ripper014
11-11-2009, 12:52 PM
When I get unsolicited advise from lower level players I tell em off immedieatly in a polite, respectful way. "Man, I've been playing better tennis much longer than you have." Consultation sessions stops right there.

I just smile and say "you might be right"...

VaBeachTennis
11-11-2009, 02:05 PM
Maybe weights weren't right for you, but 135 is very low for your height.

Yeah it is, almost like emaciated. I think it's like 20+ pounds below weight for that height.

Falloutjr
11-11-2009, 03:45 PM
Well, I wouldn't consider that bad advice because, depending on age and so forth, its easier to hit a 2HBH for most people. Many females and kids, for example, struggle trying to hit a one hander because strength becomes an issue also.

It was a joke! But seriously I'm glad I didn't listen to my coach and stuck with 1h its very good for my playstyle plus it's so pretty! :D I was 15 and 5'10" 170 at the time, learning complex things and strength weren't an issue for me at that point in my life. Plus, he's a dinker. His opinions don't count :roll:

ebrainsoft
11-11-2009, 03:55 PM
The Teaching Pro at the Club I belong to insist the Open Stance Forehand is improper form and that the Close Stance Forehand is the proper way to hit a forehand. I would agree with him if this was the 1970s!

Slazenger07
11-12-2009, 08:04 AM
I remember when I first started my coach told me 2hbh was better than 1hbh. What a noob!

hahaha indeed 1hbh rules!

Camilio Pascual
11-12-2009, 08:08 AM
to hit with more pace
Same here.

Slazenger07
11-12-2009, 08:09 AM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

Why is that bad advice? Guarantee when you do your game will improve alot.

Slazenger07
11-12-2009, 08:10 AM
One of the pros at a Country Club where I used to take lessons told me that hitting with too much topspin was a bad idea. He couldnt have been more wrong, now my forehand rules!

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 08:40 AM
All advice on stroke mechanics offered by a doubles partner when they are at net and you are at baseline, unless they have eyes in the back of their head.

Mick
11-12-2009, 08:48 AM
Why is that bad advice? Guarantee when you do your game will improve alot.

5'11" and 135 lbs,

that's like the height and weight of some of the top wta players :shock:

leed must have absolutely no fat in his body, 135 lbs of pure muscles.

cghipp
11-12-2009, 08:52 AM
I had a pro at a clinic try to tell us that we should eliminate the split step during net approach.

LeeD
11-12-2009, 08:54 AM
Can't say I have no fat.
Playing as a junior in high school, starting OLB and tight end for AAA (SanFrancisco) winning varsity football team, and in spring varsity basketball 2 guard, I was about 5'7" and 120 arounds. Plenty big enough to knock around our All-City halfback and fullback, who weighed 190 and 225lbs. on one on one tackling drills, them with a guard or tackle, them starting 5 yards behind the line. You KNOW, if they gained 5 yards, I wouldn't be a starter.
But carrying anything extra that doesn't allow you to move quicker, change directions instantly, and start that first 10 yards is counterproductive.
You guys saw how skinny Federer was for a while early this year. His oft arm was like emaniciated, his right arm barely normal, and he must have weighed below 150.

ebrainsoft
11-12-2009, 09:02 AM
Can't say I have no fat.
Playing as a junior in high school, starting OLB and tight end for AAA (SanFrancisco) winning varsity football team, and in spring varsity basketball 2 guard, I was about 5'7" and 120 arounds. Plenty big enough to knock around our All-City halfback and fullback, who weighed 190 and 225lbs. on one on one tackling drills, them with a guard or tackle, them starting 5 yards behind the line. You KNOW, if they gained 5 yards, I wouldn't be a starter.
But carrying anything extra that doesn't allow you to move quicker, change directions instantly, and start that first 10 yards is counterproductive.
You guys saw how skinny Federer was for a while early this year. His oft arm was like emaniciated, his right arm barely normal, and he must have weighed below 150.

I hope this isn't bad advice but Legs and Abs strength will improve your game. Federer has skinny arms but check out his quads.

LeeD
11-12-2009, 09:13 AM
Tennis is all about torso and thigh strength. You can be lightweight, but movement makes up for lots, as does quick footwork and movement. Eyes and anticipation help equally, so it's not always the big slugs that play winning tennis.

GinoGinelli
11-12-2009, 09:42 AM
.............

Slazenger07
11-12-2009, 09:44 AM
5'11" and 135 lbs,

that's like the height and weight of some of the top wta players :shock:

leed must have absolutely no fat in his body, 135 lbs of pure muscles.

I know I dont, packin 35 lbs of lean muscle mass. I only weigh 145lbs, but you probably wouldnt guess that looking at me, my body fat has got to be 3-4%.

More ripped than Rafa son! :)

BajeDuane
11-12-2009, 10:20 AM
When I was playing juniors, I was doing an overhead drill and I was hitting the overhead and bouncing the ball over the fence. The coach told me to stop, that is it better to hit them deep, that it is harder to return.

I was like and bouncing it over the fence is easier to reach?

benasp
11-12-2009, 10:28 AM
When I was playing juniors, I was doing an overhead drill and I was hitting the overhead and bouncing the ball over the fence. The coach told me to stop, that is it better to hit them deep, that it is harder to return.

I was like and bouncing it over the fence is easier to reach?

that not that bad of an advice, in a game you won't always be able to hit it over the fence and it will give a returnable lob for the opponent. Think of it twice befora calling advice "worse ever"

BajeDuane
11-12-2009, 10:39 AM
yeah I agree that is not worse ever, but that is all I could think of right now.

Mick
11-12-2009, 11:14 AM
sounds like your coach did not want to lose his tennis balls :)

LeeD
11-12-2009, 11:20 AM
That's exactly what I thought. Coach starts with a limited # of balls. You hit a few over the fence, and little kids steal them, coach has less balls!
Same thing happenned to me 8th grade baseball. Left field fence was like 660' from home plate, right field fence (thos 50 odd feet high) was only about 220' from home plate. I decided to bat left handed and rocked several over the fence into the sand dunes. Coach decided NOT to invite me back the next day. You'd think a guy who could hit over 300' left handed, and I was a rightie batter, would get an invite. Nope, next day I joined the track team.
Turns out the team practiced with about 20 baseballs, according to our SS.

JRstriker12
11-12-2009, 11:21 AM
Any time the player you just beat says. Yeah good match. One thing I noticed though was [fill in the blank], you should start [fill in the blank] like this.

Frank Silbermann
11-12-2009, 09:23 PM
The Teaching Pro at the Club I belong to insist the Open Stance Forehand is improper form and that the Close Stance Forehand is the proper way to hit a forehand. What he said is true, it's just that with today's high bouncing surfaces, big lightweight rackets and limited length matches (due to use of tie-breakers), improper form is more effective.

The worst tennis advice I ever received was, "The backhand is the more natural shot, and most good players are better on the backhand side." That can only be true if a half-speed slice can be considered a better shot than a 3/4 pace topspin shot.

borg number one
11-12-2009, 10:02 PM
When I was 10-11, in about 1979 or so, I was playing with a Jack Kramer autograph and playing junior tennis tournaments (12 and Under). By then, larger racquets, and some graphite frames started really making their mark, such as the Prince Graphite, etc, etc..

http://www.retroracquets.com/Images/jack-1-full.jpg

Well, my old-school GREAT tennis coach gave me lots of racquet advice and I always bought my racquets from his little pro shop/tennis store. He taught me all the basics just right and made me fall in love with the Game and was a HUGE influence on me.

Yet, he did give me some really bad tennis advice. He said, "don't switch from your Jack Kramer", because "we don't play with these new racquets" and these "new racquets" aren't the "real deal" so to speak. He somewhat missed how much of an impact the new frames would have and how much harder you could hit with them, etc. especially at that young age. The sweet spot size change was the biggest difference that I felt instantly.

I switched to the "Head Vector" (metal), with Africord Gut Strings shortly thereafter and played with those during 14 and Under tournaments and of course graphite frames as well in later years!

The new wave of new frames became a tidal wave and started really changing the Game. Suddenly racquets made by Prince, Yamaha, Head, and Wilson, etc. were EVERYWHERE! Popular frames included the Prince Graphite, the Head Pro, and the Wilson Ultra were everywhere at tournaments, instead of wood racquets like the previously omnipresent Jack Kramer Autograph were everywhere.

By then, I had moved away from Alabama, and to Texas, thereby leaving my first Coach and those first frames behind. Yet, I'm so lucky to have learned with those frames! It made a huge difference to be able to learn with them (weight/sweet spot/feel was sublime!), but then I started really enjoying the suddenly HUGE sweet spots especially, which made things a lot easier in so many ways in comparison. It was sort of like warming up by swinging your racquet with the cover on, and then taking it off and swinging with it. It was relatively easy for me all of a sudden.

CHOcobo
11-12-2009, 11:16 PM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

holly **** that's a really good advice for a 135lb at 5'11". thats unhealthy.

halalula1234
11-13-2009, 12:39 AM
when someones not better than you and think they are and keep scoulding u for errors and telling u what to do when they're wrong and in a cocky tone... doesnt that just **** u off? I just smile and say " ok i didnt know that!!!" even thought i do..

BajeDuane
11-13-2009, 06:52 AM
This is not advice someone told me, but I was giving a lady a lesson and she was hitting all her forehands short or in the net. So I realised she basically had no backswing, so I said take the racket back. She said her coach at home told her she does not need to take the racket back to hit forehand ground strokes.

JRstriker12
11-13-2009, 08:21 AM
What he said is true, it's just that with today's high bouncing surfaces, big lightweight rackets and limited length matches (due to use of tie-breakers), improper form is more effective.


Wha?????

How is an open stance groundstroke "improper form?" and what does that have to do with playing best of 3 or court surface? Longer matches plus fast surfaces does not equal, closed stance....

Improper form is not more effective than proper form, no matter which way you put it. Proper techniques include open, semi-open, and closed stances for groundstrokes depending on the situation.

pabletion
11-13-2009, 10:28 AM
"you are going like this (makes fh gesture with arm and hand), and its like this (makes fh gesture with arm and hand"-

This from a guy I later beat 6-1 6-0, who was watching me play a practice match from outside my court, and offered his "expertees" without me asking. Anything more annoying than this when youre playing like crap?

Mick
11-13-2009, 10:42 AM
maybe this is one of the reasons why federer is playing without a coach. his techniques are better than those from all the coaches, why should he listen to them?

Rambler124
11-13-2009, 10:43 AM
Wha?????

How is an open stance groundstroke "improper form?" and what does that have to do with playing best of 3 or court surface? Longer matches plus fast surfaces does not equal, closed stance....

Improper form is not more effective than proper form, no matter which way you put it. Proper techniques include open, semi-open, and closed stances for groundstrokes depending on the situation.

Gonna have to agree here. I read Frank's post and basically felt it was a joke almost? Posting bad advice in a thread called "Worst tennis advice you ever got". Not gonna lie I got a laught out of it.

Not sure how closed stance relates to court surface and length of match? Closed stance is proper form, so is open stance, semi-open stance.....

tennisguy2009
11-13-2009, 01:26 PM
the correct "grip size" technique which you will find all over the internet as well as from old school coaches, the finger space method, horrible advice.

if you want to whip the racket head, you better be playing with 1 or 2 grips sizes "too small", no finger gap

SystemicAnomaly
11-13-2009, 01:27 PM
"Snap your wrist!" Years ago, when I was first learning the serve, I was employing too much wrist flexion as a result of this oft-repeated mantra.

alan_kt_wong
11-13-2009, 02:04 PM
After I finished a match with somebody, he told me that my second serve toss needed to be further forward so that I could jump into it and put more pace on the serve.

Problem was that my second serve percentage >> his second server percentage, because I was kicking my 2nd serves in.

kevsaenz
11-13-2009, 05:00 PM
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=283313&highlight=high+balls
i thought this thread had some pretty good ones

DiZyAbOiT
11-14-2009, 09:47 AM
Lol I went to a coach this fall, and I bet ya cannot beat this advice. " a ground stroke is like a spoon in your hand going to eat" lmaoo. Seriouslyy?

Kick_It
11-14-2009, 11:26 AM
My faves:

1) You really should try a 2 handed forehand; it'll give you more power and it is working really well for Gene Mayer.

I'd have to say that's my all time worst advice and was stupid enough to give it a shot for a couple months.

2) "All ya gotta do is win the last point."

Very true advice - but so trivial I found it more humorous than helpful ;-)

86golf
11-14-2009, 01:16 PM
Brush up on the back of the ball...sure if you want to hit spinny short shots that get killed from mid-court

Overheads should hit you between the eyes if you miss...not really, every pro I've seen on You-tube lines them up to their right and slightly in front
(for a righty)

JRstriker12
11-14-2009, 02:04 PM
Brush up on the back of the ball...sure if you want to hit spinny short shots that get killed from mid-court

Overheads should hit you between the eyes if you miss...not really, every pro I've seen on You-tube lines them up to their right and slightly in front
(for a righty)

Hmmmm.... I don't think brush up on the back of the ball is bad advice necessarily, as if you are teaching top spin, it's an acurate description of what you want to do. Problem is, how far the person takes that execution. Yeah, without really driving through the ball, you could end up hitting a short shot.

peli_kan
11-16-2009, 01:35 AM
Lol I went to a coach this fall, and I bet ya cannot beat this advice. " a ground stroke is like a spoon in your hand going to eat" lmaoo. Seriouslyy?

Don't make yourself look like a fool. Take his advice and develop a thorough follow through, unless you feel like playing push and dink tennis instead.

Honestly, I'm surprised by the quantity of "bad advice" cited in this thread that is actually perfectly legitimate. Generally, people can observe and criticize far above the level at which they can play. You need to realize that advice must be evaluated first independently from its source, and only later with regards to credentials.

When players that I've beat point out aberrations in my swing or holes in my strategy, I TAKE NOTE. They've spent the last hour or so focused on watching me, analyzing how I move and hit. If anything, their observations may be more accurate than that of anyone on the sidelines.

LeeD
11-16-2009, 08:42 AM
Well let's see.....:shock:
By my junior year (high school), I could whup my basketball coach in all aspects of basketball except blocking out (he weighed 220 lbs.) but I listened to him.....
By my senior year (HS), I knocked the assistant coach off the 2 man sled, but I still listened to him.
End of first semester novice fencing I beat the old Markee (ItalianGoldMedal, Olympics in mid 50's) 6-3 pretty consistently, but I still listened to his teachings and advice.....
So yeah, oftentimes, a person who gives advice is not nearly at the level of advice he's trying to give......:shock:

ChipNCharge
11-16-2009, 01:14 PM
Worst tennis advice you ever got?

"Just guard the alley"

Larrysümmers
11-17-2009, 11:08 AM
Dont take a water break during the match, it intimidates the other player.

Falloutjr
11-17-2009, 07:16 PM
Well let's see.....:shock:
By my junior year (high school), I could whup my basketball coach in all aspects of basketball except blocking out (he weighed 220 lbs.) but I listened to him.....
By my senior year (HS), I knocked the assistant coach off the 2 man sled, but I still listened to him.
End of first semester novice fencing I beat the old Markee (ItalianGoldMedal, Olympics in mid 50's) 6-3 pretty consistently, but I still listened to his teachings and advice.....
So yeah, oftentimes, a person who gives advice is not nearly at the level of advice he's trying to give......:shock:

Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach.

Mick
11-17-2009, 09:23 PM
a more advanced player gave me this advice:

it's better to make an unforced error (by attempting a low percentage shot) than to let your opponent hit a winner.

i don't buy it because how do i know that my opponent will hit a winner? he could choke and make an unforced error too (after i have returned the ball).

maverick66
11-17-2009, 09:36 PM
it's better to make an unforced error (by attempting a low percentage shot) than to let your opponent hit a winner.


And most good players will say make your opponent hit one more ball. Always try to get in one more ball. If your opponent is ripping winners left and right yes go for more but until that happens stay in your comfort level.


And for another piece of bad advice I got. You are wasting your time lifting weights. Lifting weights will only make you a bodybuilder not a good tennis player. No good player would ever lift a weight. I beat that guy by grinding him down. Not going for winners but giving him the Aggasi first set strategy of hitting just close enough for you to get there. He was bright red and sucking wind within 3 games.

ubermeyer
11-17-2009, 09:43 PM
The worst tennis advice I ever received was, "The backhand is the more natural shot, and most good players are better on the backhand side." That can only be true if a half-speed slice can be considered a better shot than a 3/4 pace topspin shot.

It is for some people, who actually know how to hit a backhand without slicing it.

ebrainsoft
11-18-2009, 07:35 AM
The Teaching Pro at the Club I belong to insist the Open Stance Forehand is improper form and that the Close Stance Forehand is the proper way to hit a forehand. I would agree with him if this was the 1970s!

What he said is true, it's just that with today's high bouncing surfaces, big lightweight rackets and limited length matches (due to use of tie-breakers), improper form is more effective.

I guess every player (men & women) in the top 100 have been using improper form for the past 20 years.

JRstriker12
11-18-2009, 07:51 AM
Don't make yourself look like a fool. Take his advice and develop a thorough follow through, unless you feel like playing push and dink tennis instead.

Honestly, I'm surprised by the quantity of "bad advice" cited in this thread that is actually perfectly legitimate. Generally, people can observe and criticize far above the level at which they can play. You need to realize that advice must be evaluated first independently from its source, and only later with regards to credentials.

When players that I've beat point out aberrations in my swing or holes in my strategy, I TAKE NOTE. They've spent the last hour or so focused on watching me, analyzing how I move and hit. If anything, their observations may be more accurate than that of anyone on the sidelines.

Meh.... Sometimes it's your opponent trying to game you. You also have to have a nose for cutting through the BS. Yes, there are people that I've played and beaten, but I trust that if they point something out, they are sincere and/or have the eye to help me out. The average dude who you play in a pick-up match that wants to show you how to hit the Federer forehand is probably not the route to go.

Well let's see.....:shock:
By my junior year (high school), I could whup my basketball coach in all aspects of basketball except blocking out (he weighed 220 lbs.) but I listened to him.....
By my senior year (HS), I knocked the assistant coach off the 2 man sled, but I still listened to him.
End of first semester novice fencing I beat the old Markee (ItalianGoldMedal, Olympics in mid 50's) 6-3 pretty consistently, but I still listened to his teachings and advice.....
So yeah, oftentimes, a person who gives advice is not nearly at the level of advice he's trying to give......:shock:

Yes - but weren't these people coaches? Which means that on average, they know what they are talking about?

LeeD
11-18-2009, 08:06 AM
Coach's, in my experience, which is limited to 5 seasons of jr high sports, 6 seasons of high school sports, and 3 seasons of college sports, are collecting the $500 per semester, sitting on their butts, smoking with their coaching buds oogling students, watching the cheerleader practices, and hoping to find a way into the panties of the cute young academic teachers. Sorry, but it's my reality.
MICK... that is the way art form tennis is played. By Safin for one. Presumming you HAVE the forcing shots, you hit your best shots and the results lay where they lay. No pushing, no fetching, but pure hitting. Practiced by quite a few women's pros in the olden days. I adopted that idea and it actually gave me a few incredible wins along with 95% losses to lesser players .. :shock::oops:
UBS... what is better? I find a person who can return with both slice AND top, can vary pace and placement, much tougher to serve to than his side that blasts the ball with consistent pace and spin. Consistent I can get used to. Change of pace, spin, and placement just confounds me.
Oh, and I can't play tennis worth a darn, which is why I'm on this internet advice site.

papa
11-18-2009, 11:22 AM
Interesting assessment of the coaching community which fortunately I don't share - seems to me something strange is going on here which I guess, like others, I don't have time for. I'm open for different ideas/suggestions about how to play the game but this goes way beyond that for some reason. Have some coaches crossed the line - absolutely, just like in every other profession.

LeeD
11-18-2009, 12:44 PM
My reference above is for junior high, high, and Div111 team coaches. Not individual private coaching, for sure, and NOT PE teachers either. Harsh? Well, maybe I grew up in the '60's and things were different then, but I don't think so knowing the gymastic, badminton, and tennis team coaches that I know personally.

tennisguy5
11-18-2009, 06:27 PM
I was once told by my friend that is a huge know it all, but knows nothing about tennis, that i should be tactical and sneaky with my tennis play, and hide below the net. Then, as the other team sees the gap and proceeds to hit it torwards the open court, to jump up and finish the point with a suprise attack. I dont know if i could have recieved any worse advise. :)

Frank Silbermann
11-19-2009, 08:29 PM
I guess every player (men & women) in the top 100 have been using improper form for the past 20 years. Pretty much so, though there might have been a few still using more-or-less correct technique as late as the early '90s. If we ever go back to wooden rackets with no tie-breakers, the technique used by today's players will hold them back.

yellowoctopus
11-20-2009, 01:45 PM
Worst tennis advice (from Coach Taylor in Berkmar High School): Hunch your shoulders and stay low during your groundstrokes, like a basketball player.

Glad I never took him seriously.

nCode747
11-20-2009, 10:00 PM
Use the continental grip for forehands.

Cody
11-20-2009, 10:05 PM
Use the continental grip for forehands.

unless your J Mac......

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19gmJilFKlI

Puddy
11-20-2009, 10:17 PM
And most good players will say make your opponent hit one more ball. Always try to get in one more ball. If your opponent is ripping winners left and right yes go for more but until that happens stay in your comfort level.

Hey Maverick66,

Please don't take offense, but hitting just one more ball in is IMO a good tactic for some players, especially players who have good/great defense. After all, tennis is a mathematical equation: just hit the ball in more times than your opponent - keep it that simple and all will be great (a la Bjorn Borg).

However, if you have big shots, then go for it and strike first.

Have a good weekend-

tennis_balla
11-21-2009, 06:40 AM
Join the Tennis Warehouse Talk Tennis message boards.....

5263
11-21-2009, 08:06 AM
Hey Maverick66,

Please don't take offense, but hitting just one more ball in is IMO a good tactic for some players, especially players who have good/great defense. After all, tennis is a mathematical equation: just hit the ball in more times than your opponent - keep it that simple and all will be great (a la Bjorn Borg).

However, if you have big shots, then go for it and strike first.


I think the idea of making them hit one more ball is mostly (not always) predicated on when you are under some pressure by their shot, which is not usually when you need to bring your big guns. Yes, of course there are those times on the run, pulled out of court where going for it may be a ok way to go as well.

Fedace
12-05-2009, 07:45 PM
Today, i got a advice from this College player who was subbing in as a Pro at the club. He Said " NEVER leave the ground on the serve,,,,Meaning,, NEVER jump up or reach up on your serve. Always make sure your foot is firmly touching the ground when making contact with your serve" LMAO

maverick66
12-05-2009, 08:25 PM
However, if you have big shots, then go for it and strike first.

I could hit big but the unforced errors would rack up over time if i went for it most of the time. Why not let the other guy give me points instead. If I hit a winner or he misses its still one point.
Plus if you always make them hit one more ball you would be amazed at how many people assume there gonna win a point and stop playing.

Today, i got a advice from this College player who was subbing in as a Pro at the club. He Said " NEVER leave the ground on the serve,,,,Meaning,, NEVER jump up or reach up on your serve. Always make sure your foot is firmly touching the ground when making contact with your serve" LMAO

Thats pretty bad. The fact that he got to college and believes this to be true makes me sad for college tennis.

Fedace
12-06-2009, 09:03 AM
I could hit big but the unforced errors would rack up over time if i went for it most of the time. Why not let the other guy give me points instead. If I hit a winner or he misses its still one point.
Plus if you always make them hit one more ball you would be amazed at how many people assume there gonna win a point and stop playing.



Thats pretty bad. The fact that he got to college and believes this to be true makes me sad for college tennis.

Exactly,,, he said the power on the serve comes from the Ground. and you are transferring the Power from the Ground to the ball.......ROTFL:):) I had to restrain myself from cracking up cause he sounded like he really believed that and he is a VERY Nice guy. but believe it or not, he does have a very powerful serve with good topspin. Had problem with accuracy though....:) Thank God, it wasn't a Stanford player that said this......of course, that would never happen.....................lol

jswinf
12-06-2009, 11:39 AM
I was once told by my friend that is a huge know it all, but knows nothing about tennis, that i should be tactical and sneaky with my tennis play, and hide below the net. Then, as the other team sees the gap and proceeds to hit it torwards the open court, to jump up and finish the point with a suprise attack. I dont know if i could have recieved any worse advise. :)

Call for a really densely-woven net, or a really skinny player.

beedlejuice22
12-06-2009, 03:03 PM
At 5'11" and 135lbs., some really bad players told me to lift weights and get stronger.

I'm 5'9" and the same weight and still very skinny. That sounds like pretty good advice to me.

Mr. Hokey
12-06-2009, 06:18 PM
From my JV coach in high school

"You're not getting enough of flat on your slice backhand. Try to slice up more on the ball."

That is verbatim what he said, and I still have no idea what he meant.

Mick
12-06-2009, 06:52 PM
when i first started playing doubles, a more experienced doubles player told me to stand very close to the net. at the time, i thought he was crazy because i would become a target for the other team to blast the ball at.

Now that i have played a lot of doubles matches, i think that was a good advice, provided that net person can volley and move fast to get out of the way when he is unable to block the ball.

Fedace
12-07-2009, 04:00 PM
From my JV coach in high school

"You're not getting enough of flat on your slice backhand. Try to slice up more on the ball."

That is verbatim what he said, and I still have no idea what he meant.

He probably meant you are Chopping down on the slice too much so your ball is floating up with too much slice. so hit it little flatter like Rosewall used to and his tiny brain could only put it by saying "slice up on the ball" meaning don't chop down so much..........:)

Fedace
12-07-2009, 04:02 PM
when i first started playing doubles, a more experienced doubles player told me to stand very close to the net. at the time, i thought he was crazy because i would become a target for the other team to blast the ball at.

Now that i have played a lot of doubles matches, i think that was a good advice, provided that net person can volley and move fast to get out of the way when he is unable to block the ball.

It is actually much easier to handle the low volleys if stand very close to the net. Now provided that your opponent's shots are low to medium paced balls. if they are rocketing the ball at 80 mph then that maybe a problem.

fps
12-07-2009, 04:12 PM
it wasn't advice, but when i was a kid, and a lotta kids do it, i mimicked the adults who were dollying the ball to me so i could hit it. thus i never developed good stroke mechanics. who am i kidding, i played a few times at 11 and gave up for 10 years. set me back that did! i swear there's an epidemic of underhitting kids in britain.

GeorgeLucas
12-07-2009, 04:20 PM
"YOU'RE too GOOD. GET WORSE."

Fedace
12-07-2009, 04:22 PM
"YOU'RE too GOOD. GET WORSE."

Same advice as Federer gets......consider yourself to be priviledged....:)

user92626
12-07-2009, 05:00 PM
when i first started playing doubles, a more experienced doubles player told me to stand very close to the net. at the time, i thought he was crazy because i would become a target for the other team to blast the ball at.

Now that i have played a lot of doubles matches, i think that was a good advice, provided that net person can volley and move fast to get out of the way when he is unable to block the ball.

That's a stupid advice. I still get it from time to time, too, and I am trying to ignore it.

They give you that advice because they figure any worse newbie could just stick the racket up and chances are the ball would land on opponent's court.

You never get to learn proper volley and there ain't much to learn from that position; you don't feel comfortable and can't judge the shot; in fact you are not even covering the net position effectively, given the angle. Don't let others treat you like an idiot.

Re the part about "provided that net person ..." Well, if he's a good volleyor he'd know where to position and when to close in, right?

mental midget
12-07-2009, 05:44 PM
from the minute i started playing, i hit a fairly spinny forehand with a sw/w grip. i don't remember learning a specific grip, it just felt natural from the get-go.

starting out, this meant i tended to drop balls a little short in the court. for a while, i worked with a coach who made me switch to an eastern, bordering on conti grip in an attempt to get more penetration into the court. i tried, but just was NOT feeling it. eventually, i switched back, and the problem corrected itself. but for about a year there, my forehand was a total disaster.

maybe not bad advice for some people, but terrible for me. just not a flat grip guy i guess.