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groundbreaker
11-10-2009, 08:57 PM
NOTE: This is for high school-level tennis.

I have a scenario for you all to give your opinion on and why. I want you to decide which player should go with this player:

Main doubles player
--projected #1 in singles
--BIG serve, especially the first
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--very strong forehand, solid backhand
--loves to go for winners
--solid at volleys
--11th grade, 6'3

Here are the 2 players to compare:

Young Talent
--projected #2 in singles
--powerful first serve, weaker second serve, neither has slice
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--solid groundstrokes, able to hit winners on good occasions
--solid at the net
--9th grade, 5'7-5'8
--experience in quite a few USTA tournaments

Experience(me)
--projected #3 in singles
--faster first serve than the freshman, rarely double faults, can use slice and flat serves and sometimes a kick serve
--left-handed, 1-handed backhand
--powerful forehand, solid backhand which has very effective slice
--great touch at the net, can hit half-volleys easily
--12th grade, 6'0
--no USTA experience
--has lost to the freshman before in local tournament
--has played with the main doubles player in 1 varsity match previous(won 3-1 ret.)

The freshman is better than me in singles, and he has better groundstrokes than I do, but his serve isn't very damaging like mine. I'm also lefty, which would complement my partner. My slice serve would also help him at the net. What I don't know: does being better at singles necessarily mean one is better at doubles?

Vyse
11-10-2009, 09:05 PM
I always go for youth but this guy has experience. you are a senior so you should probably win. good luck

GuyClinch
11-10-2009, 09:41 PM
You will probably get it as a senior - don't sweat it. It seems likely your the better doubles player. Good luck.

maverick66
11-10-2009, 09:41 PM
What I don't know: does being better at singles necessarily mean one is better at doubles?

no it doesnt. It depends what you can do. Big servers and good net players are huge in doubles. Guys without the ability to go forward can win but its an uphill battle. And also it depends on how you play together. If you dont mesh with someone its not gonna work. Your games have to work off one another to win at a good level. So my answer would be to let you both play a match or two with him and see who works with him better.

Geezer Guy
11-10-2009, 09:49 PM
You say the Young guy has played in lots of USTA tournaments, but the Experienced guy hasn't played in any USTA tournaments. That seems backwards to me.

Anyway, I'd say the best partner for the Main Player is the guy who can perform well under pressure and play SOLIDLY if not spectacularly. A player who can set up the Main Player. Someone who may not win points, but won't lose them either.

I don't know which of the two of you that describes, but maybe you do.

groundbreaker
11-10-2009, 10:29 PM
You say the Young guy has played in lots of USTA tournaments, but the Experienced guy hasn't played in any USTA tournaments. That seems backwards to me.

Sorry, I didn't clarify that well enough. The young guy has experience in USTA, but not in high school tennis, meaning he probably hasn't dealt with as many pushers or adverse weather conditions like me and the main doubles players (we get a lot of wind early during the season since we are in like a mini-valley, so it's like having a wind tunnel). I have experience in varsity matches, just not USTA.

prattle128
11-10-2009, 11:54 PM
Your game sounds like it would complement the other player better. Seems to me (assuming there aren't any chemistry problems), that you guys should be together.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-11-2009, 01:48 AM
NOTE: This is for high school-level tennis.

I have a scenario for you all to give your opinion on and why. I want you to decide which player should go with this player:

Main doubles player
--projected #1 in singles
--BIG serve, especially the first
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--very strong forehand, solid backhand
--loves to go for winners
--solid at volleys
--11th grade, 6'3

Here are the 2 players to compare:

Young Talent
--projected #2 in singles
--powerful first serve, weaker second serve, neither has slice
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--solid groundstrokes, able to hit winners on good occasions
--solid at the net
--9th grade, 5'7-5'8
--experience in quite a few USTA tournaments

Experience(me)
--projected #3 in singles
--faster first serve than the freshman, rarely double faults, can use slice and flat serves and sometimes a kick serve
--left-handed, 1-handed backhand
--powerful forehand, solid backhand which has very effective slice
--great touch at the net, can hit half-volleys easily
--12th grade, 6'0
--no USTA experience
--has lost to the freshman before in local tournament
--has played with the main doubles player in 1 varsity match previous(won 3-1 ret.)

The freshman is better than me in singles, and he has better groundstrokes than I do, but his serve isn't very damaging like mine. I'm also lefty, which would complement my partner. My slice serve would also help him at the net. What I don't know: does being better at singles necessarily mean one is better at doubles?

Your information sucks.

The one who clicks with his partner better plays better doubles. In addition to that, there are certain intangibles that doubles players have THROUGH EXPERIENCE that singles players don't. So pick the guy who clicks with his partner, then have them play doubles often to try and develop that experience.

Better singles players don't make better doubles players unless those singles players are so incredibly dominant in their sport.

Better doubles players make better singles players if those doubles players can deal with covering the entire court on their own and bring some firepower and consistency from the baseline with it.

The freshman (if your information is truly correct) is actually the "more experienced player" and you're just the dumb caveman with the big club that doesn't know how to use it (if you can even handle it to begin with).

Bottom line, you won't know who is better in doubles unless you guys actually go and play some doubles!

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-11-2009, 01:52 AM
Sorry, I didn't clarify that well enough. The young guy has experience in USTA, but not in high school tennis, meaning he probably hasn't dealt with as many pushers or adverse weather conditions like me and the main doubles players (we get a lot of wind early during the season since we are in like a mini-valley, so it's like having a wind tunnel). I have experience in varsity matches, just not USTA.

Experience in USTA >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Varsity high school tennis experience!

Pushers exist in USTA. Not only that, these pushers can be the same as high school pushers, or they can be pushers that junk you with heavy spin, or that just don't miss and chase everything down, always hitting a solid shot.

And adverse weather conditions EXIST EVERYWHERE IN THE AREA! The worst weather I've ever played in was by far in a USTA match. Granted the weather is more consistently bad in high school tennis (due to terrible courts), but he's probably a solid player and can handle it.

No experience shines through better than match experience, but it only shines during matches, SO PLAY SOME AND FIND OUT WHO'S BETTER!

5263
11-11-2009, 06:22 AM
experience, just the way you explained this shows lots of understanding of HS tennis. From what you say, you have more dubs experience I guess and that is what is needed.

LuckyR
11-11-2009, 08:36 AM
NOTE: This is for high school-level tennis.

I have a scenario for you all to give your opinion on and why. I want you to decide which player should go with this player:

Main doubles player
--projected #1 in singles
--BIG serve, especially the first
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--very strong forehand, solid backhand
--loves to go for winners
--solid at volleys
--11th grade, 6'3

Here are the 2 players to compare:

Young Talent
--projected #2 in singles
--powerful first serve, weaker second serve, neither has slice
--right-handed, 2-handed backhand
--solid groundstrokes, able to hit winners on good occasions
--solid at the net
--9th grade, 5'7-5'8
--experience in quite a few USTA tournaments

Experience(me)
--projected #3 in singles
--faster first serve than the freshman, rarely double faults, can use slice and flat serves and sometimes a kick serve
--left-handed, 1-handed backhand
--powerful forehand, solid backhand which has very effective slice
--great touch at the net, can hit half-volleys easily
--12th grade, 6'0
--no USTA experience
--has lost to the freshman before in local tournament
--has played with the main doubles player in 1 varsity match previous(won 3-1 ret.)

The freshman is better than me in singles, and he has better groundstrokes than I do, but his serve isn't very damaging like mine. I'm also lefty, which would complement my partner. My slice serve would also help him at the net. What I don't know: does being better at singles necessarily mean one is better at doubles?


The key pieces of info that would answer the question aren't on this list, but I will make some assumptions.

The first player looks like a "finisher" in doubles, he needs a solid baseliner to set him up for his poaches and great volleys/overheads. I see two ways on answering the question: first, who understands doubles strategy better (and has the personality to admit that they don't understand it and take in the information). The third player (you) probably wins here. Second, who has the kind of a game that will support the first player the best. You post that the second player is "solid" and that you are "powerful" from the baseline. I don't know exactly what you mean but I guess I would take solid over powerful.

Djokovicfan4life
11-11-2009, 08:55 AM
The freshman (if your information is truly correct) is actually the "more experienced player" and you're just the dumb caveman with the big club that doesn't know how to use it (if you can even handle it to begin with).



Who ****ed in your Cheerios this morning?

Falloutjr
11-11-2009, 03:50 PM
If you guys are projected singles players, shouldn't you be playing singles?! My HS team is fairly full, I don't have to play annoying doubles 8) maybe you guys have to swing? IDK. Best players should play the highest spots.

Arzon
11-11-2009, 06:33 PM
If you are about the same level as the freshman (little worse) and you are somewhat friends with the doubles player, then you shouldn't worry. HS coaches usually show a little leniancy toward seniors since its your last year.

groundbreaker
11-12-2009, 12:41 PM
If you are about the same level as the freshman (little worse) and you are somewhat friends with the doubles player, then you shouldn't worry. HS coaches usually show a little leniancy toward seniors since its your last year.

Probably. It's more than just the doubles player. We're all friends with each other along with the lower ranked players in our team's top 6(those who play in varsity matches), so it's all good.:)

strcmp
11-13-2009, 08:07 AM
USTA experience is better than HS experience in my book. More pushers and experienced players in USTA than HS. A lot of HS players lack consistency and like to bash the ball and hope it goes in or go for low % shots.

I'd say the younger guy is more experienced than you and has more potential to grow. If he worked on his 2nd serve he'd be set. His solidness would win matches vs. inconsistent HS players.

Also, I think having an experienced 3rd party tennis player to be the judge of both of your skills is better than judging yourself. I'm sure there's some kind of bias in there. :)

5263
11-13-2009, 09:53 AM
The freshman is better than me in singles, and he has better groundstrokes than I do, but his serve isn't very damaging like mine. I'm also lefty, which would complement my partner. My slice serve would also help him at the net. What I don't know:

does being better at singles necessarily mean one is better at doubles?

NO, better at singles in not always mean better at doubles, Especially if you are good at doubles and the divide is not too much between you in singles.

USTA is just such a big step up from avg HS matches on the whole, that most would pick the USTA player for all the tough matches he gets in a tourney. Of course if he doesn't do well there, playing USTA does not mean much.

Wish u gave more info on your loss to him. If you can play him close, but are a better dubs player, then you are good on this for sure. If he can beat you with no prob, with short points, then he is probably too strong for your dubs skill to counter. Is dubs your best tennis?

fruitytennis1
11-13-2009, 10:19 AM
About equal id give the young guy the role but you'll be picked cause ur a senior + hight makes a difference.

groundbreaker
11-13-2009, 12:52 PM
Wish u gave more info on your loss to him. If you can play him close, but are a better dubs player, then you are good on this for sure. If he can beat you with no prob, with short points, then he is probably too strong for your dubs skill to counter. Is dubs your best tennis?

He beat me 6-2,6-2. The match had a lot of close games, but he played better in the tough points. I had come off of a 2 hour plus doubles match the day previous, so I was tired. Wasn't my best match I've played, but it wasn't bad. I'd say he would beat me today in 2 tough sets.

I play both games well, but I have more potential to dominate in doubles.

@strcmp--Yeah, probably a little bit of bias.:-|

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-13-2009, 01:27 PM
Who ****ed in your Cheerios this morning?

Hes always ****y.

ubermeyer
11-15-2009, 11:58 AM
Coaches usually give preference to seniors because it's their last year to play HS tennis, and also you seem like a better fit, so good luck!

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-15-2009, 10:54 PM
Who ****ed in your Cheerios this morning?

There are a lot of people in my high school team who had the potential to be better than me, but were stubborn in trying to beat me by hitting through me and donating points in the process (and they still can't come close to overpowering me and I still hit through them). One of the things that ****es me off the most is watching younger players with the ability to play great tennis, but they don't think and end up being power players who donate so many points to their opponents through dozens of unforced errors. It REALLY ticks me off when they play pushers and can't think their way through the match. And if you try to teach them to play a more consistent and effective game, they eventually drop it because they want to whack the ball harder. Then they'll lose to the pusher and make fun of him and talk bad about him and so on...

A lot of high school players simple don't understand the importance of consistency, setting up points, or simple shot selection. THAT'S what ****ed in my COCOA puffs. (And they tried to pass it off as lemonade too...)

Ultra2HolyGrail
11-15-2009, 11:28 PM
A lot of high school players simple don't understand the importance of consistency, setting up points, or simple shot selection. THAT'S what ****ed in my COCOA puffs. (And they tried to pass it off as lemonade too...)


And this is comming from a one hander who probably has a inconsistent one handed backhand which forces you to play 'full' court tennis ;)

If you got a big serve and can volley though you could be dangerous. I highly doubt you are a consistent baseliner though.

groundbreaker
11-16-2009, 12:21 PM
A lot of high school players simple don't understand the importance of consistency, setting up points, or simple shot selection. THAT'S what ****ed in my COCOA puffs. (And they tried to pass it off as lemonade too...)

Well, I wouldn't go assuming that I'm just another basher. My game's actually starting to change to more of a grinder's game. I don't go for winners like I used to. I had a bit of a revelation about the beauty of counter-punching this past summer after my old coach constantly talking about CAP(Consistency, Accuracy, Power). Guess it finally clicked...:)