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Cindysphinx
11-11-2009, 11:52 AM
I was playing some mixed doubles recently. I hit a volley, and the lightning-fast opposing guy took off after it. My partner at baseline said something I couldn't quite make out: "[Inaudible] get it!!!" Puzzled, I kept playing the point.

Later that set, it happened again: I hit a would-be winner, and again I heard "[Inaudible] onna it!!" Huh? Was he saying, "I'll get it?" That would be odd, given that the ball hadn't even been hit to us yet.

I went back and asked my partner what he was saying. It turned out he was yelling, "He's gonna get it!!" As in, just giving me a warning that the opposing guy was actually going to try to run over and play the ball.

Um, OK. I had kinda noticed that on my own, but thanks!! :)

JavierLW
11-11-2009, 02:10 PM
That reminds me of a drill Im in where we might be in line to play singles points and the guy behind me will start yelling:

"Get it!!!!"

He does this anytime I really have to run after a ball. It's like he's cheering me on or think's he's watching me on TV or something.

He's the same sort of guy who tends to yell:

"YOURSSSS!!!!!!!" (at the very moment the ball is directly on top of me and Im about to hit it)

I think if I have to remind my partner to stay aware because the opponents "are going to get the ball back", then Ive probably found myself a partner that I wont play well with.

10sguy
11-11-2009, 10:40 PM
I was playing some mixed doubles recently. I hit a volley, and the lightning-fast opposing guy took off after it. My partner at baseline said something I couldn't quite make out: "[Inaudible] get it!!!" Puzzled, I kept playing the point.

Later that set, it happened again: I hit a would-be winner, and again I heard "[Inaudible] onna it!!" Huh? Was he saying, "I'll get it?" That would be odd, given that the ball hadn't even been hit to us yet.

I went back and asked my partner what he was saying. It turned out he was yelling, "He's gonna get it!!" As in, just giving me a warning that the opposing guy was actually going to try to run over and play the ball.

Um, OK. I had kinda noticed that on my own, but thanks!! :)

I'm positive YOU know this but, for the benefit of often uninformed others, your vocal partner was in violation of the "hindrance rule" which basically states, "Thou shalt not speak whilst ball is traveling toward opponent."

nfor304
11-11-2009, 11:21 PM
I've played with alot of guys who yell 'You!' instead of 'yours!'. It was pretty off-putting the first few times but i'm used to it now

maverick66
11-12-2009, 12:09 AM
I have played with a few guys that either didnt speak English or it was their third or fourth language. That gets fun real fast. When you get yelled at in 3-4 languages throughout a match its a new experience.

rasajadad
11-12-2009, 04:47 AM
I played against a woman who shouted "eat it" every time she hit a down the line winner. (I didn't understand the request.)

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 05:19 AM
I played against a woman who shouted "eat it" every time she hit a down the line winner. (I didn't understand the request.)

Wow. "Eat it"? What next, "Bite me!!!!"

HitItHarder
11-12-2009, 05:24 AM
One of my regular doubles partners yells "Ball's up" everytime he hits a lob that may drop short and I am at the net.

I really appreciate it since it keeps me from eating an overhead at the net. When I hear it, I back up quick. However, I have had several opponents claim a hinderance because they claim they thought it was an out call.

I don't have a problem with an opponent calling a hinderance on something like that, but I don't think you have to play in complete silence either just because the ball is traveling toward your oppenent.

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 05:47 AM
One of my regular doubles partners yells "Ball's up" everytime he hits a lob that may drop short and I am at the net.

I really appreciate it since it keeps me from eating an overhead at the net. When I hear it, I back up quick. However, I have had several opponents claim a hinderance because they claim they thought it was an out call.



Really? I mean, they would be technically correct if they actually did stop playing and claimed hindrance. I don't see how "Balls up" could sound anything like an "out" call, though. Did they stop playing immediately, or did they try to return the ball?

I had a teammate try to call a hindrance on herself in practice recently. She hit some bad shot and said something commenting on the crapworthiness of her shot. We kept playing and lost the point. She came to net and said that she was giving us the point because she had talked when the ball was on its way to us. We said no, it isn't a hindrance unless we say it's a hindrance, and because we kept playing there was no hindrance.

There are a lot of people who take the "no talking" rule way too seriously, IMHO. When I transition to net, I usually say to my partner, "I'm in." This is because many people at my level do not come to net, so partners tend to assume that their partner is back there to back them up. I don't want my partner assuming I am back there when I am not, so I tell them. Am I talking when the ball is on its way to my opponent? Yes. Does it violate the hindrance rule? Only if someone catches the ball and claims hindrance. Honestly, I doubt they even hear me because I say it quietly because I don't want them to hear it.

Topaz
11-12-2009, 05:52 AM
I'm positive YOU know this but, for the benefit of often uninformed others, your vocal partner was in violation of the "hindrance rule" which basically states, "Thou shalt not speak whilst ball is traveling toward opponent."


Of course you can speak...communication is a huge part of doubles. If you are communicating in a way that does not interfere with your opponent's ability to play the point, then you're a-ok.

Topaz
11-12-2009, 06:00 AM
Probably the weirdest thing I say...'go go go go go' when my partner is trying to get to a hard shot, or to communicate that it is their's (and I'm not gonna make it)...meant as encouragement!

Haven't played much dubs lately, so usually the dialogue is directed at me, and not suitable to be typed out on a public message board! :shock: ;)

mikeler
11-12-2009, 06:03 AM
I had a guy once in a league doubles match call out the score as "Deucy" instead of "Deuce".

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 06:14 AM
Of course you can speak...communication is a huge part of doubles. If you are communicating in a way that does not interfere with your opponent's ability to play the point, then you're a-ok.

Ya, like if you use sign language or mental telepathy, then those are okay.

But loudly proclaiming that the opponent is going to get it is not because you could distract them from making their shot.

HitItHarder
11-12-2009, 06:16 AM
Really? I mean, they would be technically correct if they actually did stop playing and claimed hindrance. I don't see how "Balls up" could sound anything like an "out" call, though. Did they stop playing immediately, or did they try to return the ball?

There are a lot of people who take the "no talking" rule way too seriously, IMHO.

My general rule is if the person stops playing right away because of my partner calling "Balls up" loudly, that is fine. I give them the benefit of the doubt that they couldn't tell the difference between "balls up" and "balls out." But I make a point to tell them that we will continue to call "Balls up" for short lobs and this is their fair warning. If in doubt, play the ball. So it is a one shot deal.

As for the instance where the opponent trys to hit the overhead so hard it knocks the cover off the ball and hits it into the net instead -- and then trys the old "wasn't that an out call, I was distracted" routine -- they don't get two chances. No hinderance. Either make the call right away or play the ball.

People take themselves way to seriously sometimes on the noise thing. Heck at our local league courts during the summer it isn't unusual for a band to come set up right behind the courts and play at the park. Sometimes the music is kind of nice. Other times it sounds like a couple cats are being tortured. Makes for some interesting matches.

TheMagicianOfPrecision
11-12-2009, 06:16 AM
I played against a woman who shouted "eat it" every time she hit a down the line winner. (I didn't understand the request.)
Uhrm...wow...that would make it impossible for me telling her to "eat it" after the match...:shock:

TheMagicianOfPrecision
11-12-2009, 06:18 AM
I've played with alot of guys who yell 'You!' instead of 'yours!'. It was pretty off-putting the first few times but i'm used to it now

Id say that is very common everywhere.

Topaz
11-12-2009, 06:52 AM
Ya, like if you use sign language or mental telepathy, then those are okay.

But loudly proclaiming that the opponent is going to get it is not because you could distract them from making their shot.

Well, around here, matches are pretty loud, a lot of talking goes on during moving, and I can safely say that nobody the leagues around my area would even try such a ridiculous call. YMMV.

drakulie
11-12-2009, 06:54 AM
what in tarnations is the OP talking about?

BMC9670
11-12-2009, 07:04 AM
I played a guy in a flex league this summer who would small talk between points. This is customary before the match and maybe even while warming up, but it was really distracting once we started the match to hear "Lot's of rain this week, huh?", and "so how long have you lived here?" etc, etc between points.

I didn't talk back much, but he didn't get the hint. Do you think this was gamesmanship on his part?

larry10s
11-12-2009, 07:10 AM
its easier for me to say you or me than yours or mine

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 07:11 AM
what in tarnations is the OP talking about?

The tarnation is that my partner kept yelling these things, and I didn't understand, see. I thought maybe he was saying he was going to get it, but the ball hadn't been struck and most people don't call "Mine" until the ball is on its way.

This particular tarnation was just a folksy little yarn to get a discussion going, that's all.

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 07:15 AM
Id say that is very common everywhere.

There is a small but very vocal contingent of players who become quite unhappy if you say "You." One such player told me that "Yours" was OK but "You" was not because it sounded like I was ordering her around.

There are also players who say that saying "You" or "Yours" or "Go, Go!" make them tighten up and feel pressured to make the shot.

They are quite serious about this, so I take them seriously and try to change my evil ways if we must play together. My preference, however, is not to play with these players because our communication styles are just too different.

drakulie
11-12-2009, 07:18 AM
The tarnation is that my partner kept yelling these things, and I didn't understand, see. I thought maybe he was saying he was going to get it, but the ball hadn't been struck and most people don't call "Mine" until the ball is on its way.

This particular tarnation was just a folksy little yarn to get a discussion going, that's all.

ok, so he was saying things on the court, such as "he's going to get it". What is so weird about that?

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 07:26 AM
ok, so he was saying things on the court, such as "he's going to get it". What is so weird about that?

Um.

What is weird is that most doubles players don't make audible predictions about whether a shot will be a winner or not. I have seen a fair amount of doubles on TV and suchlike, and never once have I heard Mike Bryan warn Bob Bryan that the opponent is going to retrieve a ball. This is obvious to anyone with 20/20 vision.

It would be a fun match to watch though, what with each player making audible predictions about what the opponents were about to do. We could call it "Extra-Sensory Perception" doubles. Imagine the possibilities: "She's gonna hit a slice!" "He's gonna run around his backhand!" "She's gonna knock it into the back fence!!"

jrod
11-12-2009, 07:29 AM
what in tarnations is the OP talking about?


Drak - I didn't know people still spoke like this...reminds me of my deceased grandmother blathering on about "the south will rise again".

Thanks for the flashback mate.

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-12-2009, 07:46 AM
Hahhahahahah

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 07:48 AM
Well, around here, matches are pretty loud, a lot of talking goes on during moving, and I can safely say that nobody the leagues around my area would even try such a ridiculous call. YMMV.

So someone yelling "he's going to get the ball" while someone is trying to get the ball is common in your area??? That figures....

That seems like the worst time to have to say something.

It's pretty rare where I am that anyone makes a ton of noise when it's not their team's turn to hit the ball, and it sticks out like a sore thumb when someone does. Maybe we just have better manners.

The only exception is occasionally someone will yell "SHORT" if they hit it too short to tell their partner they are about to get beaned in the head, but even that can be distracting if it's ill-timed (or very loud).

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 07:52 AM
So someone yelling "he's going to get the ball" while someone is trying to get the ball is common in your area??? That figures....

That seems like the worst time to have to say something.

It's pretty rare where I am that anyone makes a ton of noise when it's not their team's turn to hit the ball, and it sticks out like a sore thumb when someone does. Maybe we just have better manners.

The only exception is occasionally someone will yell "SHORT" if they hit it too short to tell their partner they are about to get beaned in the head, but even that can be distracting if it's ill-timed (or very loud).

I'd say it is common for people to say things when the ball is on its way to the opponent, but it is not common for them to yell these things.

People frequently flub a shot and chastise themselves before the point is over. No one cares.

People sometimes correct their positioning as their opponents are preparing to hit: "Stay where you are," "Watch the line." Usually people don't scream these things. Again, no one cares.

Are you saying folks don't do that where you are?

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 08:11 AM
I'd say it is common for people to say things when the ball is on its way to the opponent, but it is not common for them to yell these things.

People frequently flub a shot and chastise themselves before the point is over. No one cares.

People sometimes correct their positioning as their opponents are preparing to hit: "Stay where you are," "Watch the line." Usually people don't scream these things. Again, no one cares.

Are you saying folks don't do that where you are?

Correcting positioning is common. I do that myself but it's usually right after I hit the ball and I notice my partner is likely to move somewhere that doesnt work.

But that normally only happens in ambiguous situations or when I have a partner that doesn't know how to cover the court properly, we dont have to do it on every single point. Id say I might end up doing that 2-3 times a match if I have a good partner (or someone who just works well with me).

It probably violates the rule, but I think it's understood that at some point you dont want to interfere with your opponent's shot. (so either do it quietly or soon enough that it doesnt affect them)

It's usually just a select few though that moan right after they think they flubbed a shot.

It kind of depends though. If someone just does it out of the blue and it screws up your point there isnt much you can do about it. (after all once you try for the ball it's not hindrance anymore)

But if someone has a habit of doing it a lot then it becomes a bigger problem. I have a friend like that, who if he gives you an easy put away he cant help himself so he will moan about it.

He does the same thing when he thinks that he's hit it out only to have it fall in. He even knows it's hindrance though and since he cant control himself he'll usually let us take the point.

It's kind of like people who catch the ball in midair around here, there are usually habitual offenders and we all know who they are because it sticks out.

Hindrance is really rarely called though because you would have to call it BEFORE you hit the ball. In most cases nobody will think to do that especially if it just happens out of the blue.

So it's not really just a rule thing, it's more like a courtesy thing.

You should respect your opponents and be aware of trying not to disturb them when they are going after or hitting their shots. Saying that "everyone talks and makes noise so it's okay" doesn't make it right.

As far as proclaiming that your opponent is "going to get the ball", that's crazy.

About the only time I could see doing that is if you smack the ball sideways onto an adjacent court where everyone thinks it's been put away, but one of your opponents speeds over there somehow and hits the ball from the center line on that court onto yours which is a pretty unreal thing to do.

It happened to me once and I wished I would of said something to my partner who was just standing around thinking the point was over.

drakulie
11-12-2009, 08:18 AM
Um.

What is weird is that most doubles players don't make audible predictions about whether a shot will be a winner or not. I have seen a fair amount of doubles on TV and suchlike, and never once have I heard Mike Bryan warn Bob Bryan that the opponent is going to retrieve a ball. This is obvious to anyone with 20/20 vision.

It would be a fun match to watch though, what with each player making audible predictions about what the opponents were about to do. We could call it "Extra-Sensory Perception" doubles. Imagine the possibilities: "She's gonna hit a slice!" "He's gonna run around his backhand!" "She's gonna knock it into the back fence!!"


OK, just doesnt' seem weird.

"Weird" would be following the other team into the ladies rest room to police them.

Drak - I didn't know people still spoke like this...reminds me of my deceased grandmother blathering on about "the south will rise again".

Thanks for the flashback mate.


LOL. It was my best impersonation of this great actor:

http://zufar.blogs.friendster.com/photos/uncategorized/444814294_2c0fdf82f7_o.gif

catfish
11-12-2009, 08:29 AM
I played against a woman who shouted "eat it" every time she hit a down the line winner. (I didn't understand the request.)

Maybe she's a Weird Al Yankovic fan and was expecting you to reply with "If it gets cold re-heat it."

catfish
11-12-2009, 08:46 AM
I don't talk much during points, and neither do most of my partners. Sometimes we'll say "bounce it" to each other if it looks like a ball is going long. Sometimes I play against people who talk during points and for the most part it doesn't bother me. What does bother me is opponents who yell sharply right before you hit a ball. There's no reason to do that. I think some people do it on purpose to distract you, and they know you don't have time to stop and call a hindrance. Example: I was playing mixed against a guy who threw up a short lob, and then right before I hit the easy put away overhead he yelled "look out" very loudly to his partner. I thought a ball had rolled under my feet or something so it caused me to pull my head down during my swing and I hit the ball into the bottom of the net. I thought it was a fluke, but he did it again shortly after. That time I said something to him and he stopped. But when someone yells sharply when you are almost in your swing, you barely have time to stop and call a hindrance. So it's a tough call sometimes.

PatrickB
11-12-2009, 08:52 AM
My general rule is if the person stops playing right away because of my partner calling "Balls up" loudly, that is fine. I give them the benefit of the doubt that they couldn't tell the difference between "balls up" and "balls out." But I make a point to tell them that we will continue to call "Balls up" for short lobs and this is their fair warning. If in doubt, play the ball. So it is a one shot deal.


According to the rules, they have the right to claim a hindrance every time you do this. You may claim it is a one shot deal, but according to the rules, it is not. If you shout something as the ball is coming towards them, they may immediately claim a hindrance (before attempting to play the ball) every time. Bluntly put, warning them that you're going to hinder them doesn't make the hindrance okay.

Kostas
11-12-2009, 08:59 AM
I VERY rarely talk during a point. I am guilty of the occasional premature "nice shot" right before the opponent makes a ridiculous "get" and hits it back to us....

mikeler
11-12-2009, 09:06 AM
I VERY rarely talk during a point. I am guilty of the occasional premature "nice shot" right before the opponent makes a ridiculous "get" and hits it back to us....


What's worse is when you say "nice shot" only to find that it lands just barely out.

PushyPushster
11-12-2009, 09:23 AM
It would be a fun match to watch though, what with each player making audible predictions about what the opponents were about to do. We could call it "Extra-Sensory Perception" doubles. Imagine the possibilities: "She's gonna hit a slice!" "He's gonna run around his backhand!" "She's gonna knock it into the back fence!!"

He'sGoingToMuffTheOverheadSlamBecauseHeSucks!!

Mental note: Never join an ESP league.

HitItHarder
11-12-2009, 09:45 AM
According to the rules, they have the right to claim a hindrance every time you do this. You may claim it is a one shot deal, but according to the rules, it is not. If you shout something as the ball is coming towards them, they may immediately claim a hindrance (before attempting to play the ball) every time. Bluntly put, warning them that you're going to hinder them doesn't make the hindrance okay.

I agree that if the shout is done in a way that it distracts the ability of a player to make a shot, that is a legitimate hinderance. However, the noise has to prevent the player from playing the ball to be a hinderance - per the rules.

For instance, if my partner is on the baseline and throws up a lob that is going to land short -- then waits until the opposing player is getting ready to hit a shot to yell "back" or "balls up" -- that could be a hinderance if the opposing player chooses to call it rather than take the shot.

However, in my situation, my partner will call "balls up" as soon as he hits the ball and long before it ever crosses the net. The call isn't preventing the opposing player from playing the ball after the ball eventually gets to them. It is not done to distract anyone. It is no more of a hinderance than a person making noise when they strike the ball. To me it is a timing issue. The noise has to be done in a way it prevent a player from playing the ball.

When I say it is a one shot deal, it is because the opposing player claimed that they thought my partner called "balls out" as opposed to "balls up" - which very well could have happened. The very fact that they thought it could be an "out" call at all shows you it is immediately called when the shot is hit. Once we've said that is how my partner calls short lobs, there is no confusion as to it being an out call and it isn't impeding them from hitting a ball when it eventually comes down. There is no attempt to distract. So to me there is no hinderance.

Calling a hinderance is like a line call. If it is legit, I don't have a problem with it. But if it is being done in a way to try and game someone, it is no better than hooking somebody on a out call.

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 09:53 AM
I've said, "Point's alive!" Partner thinks ball is going to fly way long and turns her back. Opponent returns it out of the air anyway. That's a little different, because I'm not predicting whether the opponent is going to return the ball. I'm reacting to the fact that my partner has conceded the point in error.



Yes although I think if you have to do that all the time, you've got bigger problems then whether you communicated that to them or not. It's like yelling "YOURS!" when they are not going for it, by the time you get that out, it's probably too late because they stopped moving their feet.

(within reason depending on how mundane the point is)

Most of the time you have to do things like that it seems it's more because your partner(s) are not doing what's expected or you are playing with 100 different partners and you never get used to anyone so you have to over communicate to stay on the same page.

It doesn't necessarily have to the be the norm if you are lucky enough to have consistent partners or ones that just happen to play the same strategy that you do. Or you found a way to evolve around whatever they are doing versus trying to expect them to conform to you.

Wakenslam
11-12-2009, 09:58 AM
I think about the only things I say during points are "Move Your Arse!" or "Don't Miss!" :-P

Seriously though. I played doubles with this guy in Florida one time, and every time he hit the ball he would yell "HOY!" instead of grunting. It was really strange....

TheMagicianOfPrecision
11-12-2009, 10:01 AM
I think about the only things I say during points are "Move Your Arse!" or "Don't Miss!" :-P

Seriously though. I played doubles with this guy in Florida one time, and every time he hit the ball he would yell "HOY!" instead of grunting. It was really strange....

Yelling "dont miss" isnt recomended :twisted:
Theres a lot of Swedish juniors who think they are Nadal grunting "eeyyyyy" when they hit, sounds like a combination of Guga/Nadal, really annoying.

Xisbum
11-12-2009, 10:12 AM
I've played with alot of guys who yell 'You!' instead of 'yours!'. It was pretty off-putting the first few times but i'm used to it now

I'm fine with "you" as long as there's no "F" in front of it. :)

I have a Spanish-speaking friend who shouts, "Miercoles!"

Your friend says Wednesday? Now that's strange. :confused:

10sguy
11-12-2009, 10:22 AM
Yes although I think if you have to do that all the time, you've got bigger problems then whether you communicated that to them or not. It's like yelling "YOURS!" when they are not going for it, by the time you get that out, it's probably too late because they stopped moving their feet.

(within reason depending on how mundane the point is)

Most of the time you have to do things like that it seems it's more because your partner(s) are not doing what's expected or you are playing with 100 different partners and you never get used to anyone so you have to over communicate to stay on the same page.

It doesn't necessarily have to the be the norm if you are lucky enough to have consistent partners or ones that just happen to play the same strategy that you do. Or you found a way to evolve around whatever they are doing versus trying to expect them to conform to you.

Hitchhiking on the above, players should learn to adapt to the rules rather than coming up with reasons to conduct themselves outside the rules. Learn, for example to use your eyes and ears to determine where your partner is on the court and (rightfully) expect your partner to perceive for him/herself if, for example, you have hit a weak-*** short lob. This (below) has been posted innumerable times on multiple threads but a re-read of the Hindrance (yes, the spelling is correct) Rule - from "The Code" in Friend at Court - is very appropriate here:

From: 2009 “The Code” (The Players Guide for Matches When Officials are not Present)

HINDRANCE ISSUES
33. Talking during a point. A player shall not talk while the ball is moving toward
the opponent’s side of the court. If the player’s talking *interferes with the
opponent’s ability to play the ball, the player loses the point. Consider the
situation where a player hits a weak lob and loudly yells at his or her partner to
get back. If the shout is loud enough to *distract an opponent, the opponent may
claim the point based on a **deliberate interference. If the opponent chooses to
hit the lob (**or whatever the shot may be in a potential hindrance situation), and
misses it, the opponent loses the point because the opponent did not make a
timely claim of hindrance. (page 57)

* (solely in the judgment of the hindered player)

** (the player who talks in this situation may claim the interference was not
“deliberate;” however, simply “talking” in this situation is deemed deliberate)

Note: These two (* and **) clarifications are not part of the code. These are two
commonly cited examples when the “talking hindrance” rule is explained.

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 10:50 AM
Hitchhiking on the above, players should learn to adapt to the rules rather than coming up with reasons to conduct themselves outside the rules. Learn, for example to use your eyes and ears to determine where your partner is on the court and (rightfully) expect your partner to perceive for him/herself if, for example, you have hit a weak-*** short lob. This (below) has been posted innumerable times on multiple threads but a re-read of the Hindrance (yes, the spelling is correct) Rule - from "The Code" in Friend at Court - is very appropriate here:

From: 2009 “The Code” (The Players Guide for Matches When Officials are not Present)

HINDRANCE ISSUES
33. Talking during a point. A player shall not talk while the ball is moving toward
the opponent’s side of the court. If the player’s talking *interferes with the
opponent’s ability to play the ball, the player loses the point. Consider the
situation where a player hits a weak lob and loudly yells at his or her partner to
get back. If the shout is loud enough to *distract an opponent, the opponent may
claim the point based on a **deliberate interference. If the opponent chooses to
hit the lob (**or whatever the shot may be in a potential hindrance situation), and
misses it, the opponent loses the point because the opponent did not make a
timely claim of hindrance. (page 57)

* (solely in the judgment of the hindered player)

** (the player who talks in this situation may claim the interference was not
“deliberate;” however, simply “talking” in this situation is deemed deliberate)

Note: These two (* and **) clarifications are not part of the code. These are two
commonly cited examples when the “talking hindrance” rule is explained.

Yes, it also goes to define "Deliberate" as meaning something that you did within your control. (not "intention" which is different) An important point because obviously in a lot of case of course the player didnt INTEND to distract anyone, they were just "communicating"....

It even has an example of the specific situation where you yell "short".

Im usually amazed if my partner didnt notice I hit it short, but Id hate to say it but at 3.0 and 3.5 and even 4.0 not every player knows enough to keep an eye on the other net player, sometimes they tend to absently gaze at the deeper player apparently assuming that you'll clear the net player.

If you're stuck in that situation with someone like that, then you may have to accomidate that, although yelling "short" doesnt do a whole lot other then saving them from getting beamed in the head. (reality is sometimes as well they are also WAY too close to the net considering that the ball went behind them, and if they would of backed up more they'd have time to help cover court)

Id have to say I get partners that call "Short" on me though. Sometimes if someone has a really weak overhead that I do not respect and I dont feel I have time to backpedal and I want to stay in the point, I'll actually close in on them to try to smother their possible angles. If my partner is unaware of what Im doing, they may assume that I dont know it's short.

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 10:52 AM
I like when I have a partner who yells "CRUSH IT", and then I just tap it off the side of the court for a winner.

(usually the same sort of person who will keep drilling the ball deep when two people are just standing around back there flicking everything back, or they will pass up an extremely easy drop shot in order to hit the ball as hard as humanly possible either into the net or right at an opponent)

Klaus
11-12-2009, 12:09 PM
In the clinic I attend, we rotate partners ever few drills. One partner in particular, is the type of guy that gets mad when his partner makes a mistake, and then cannot resist the urge to "coach" the player on technique.
He also screams dramatically when he errs, leans back and covers his face with his hands, to make sure we all know that is not his usual playing level.

Since my technique is pretty much there, his behavior with me is to scream "yours" at the top of his lungs, or other directions: "go!" "get it!!!" "move!!!" The first few times, it startled me, and I mishit the ball into the fence. It feels like I am in "Shindler's List": "schneller, schneller!!!!"

The next time we were paired I said "can I ask you not to scream at me?"

"I do that?" he asked.

"Yes, when you're telling me it's my ball, or to move."

'Well, that's what partners do for each other," he said.

"Scream at each other?" I asked.

"You have an attitude that you don't like me," he said. (true)

"We can talk about it after class if you'd like," I said.

(frosty silence)

He doesn't yell at me anymore, in fact, he doesn't speak to me at all.

What is wrong with people??? This is a clinic jesus christ on a crutch!

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 12:40 PM
In the clinic I attend, we rotate partners ever few drills. One partner in particular, is the type of guy that gets mad when his partner makes a mistake, and then cannot resist the urge to "coach" the player on technique.
He also screams dramatically when he errs, leans back and covers his face with his hands, to make sure we all know that is not his usual playing level.

Since my technique is pretty much there, his behavior with me is to scream "yours" at the top of his lungs, or other directions: "go!" "get it!!!" "move!!!" The first few times, it startled me, and I mishit the ball into the fence. It feels like I am in "Shindler's List": "schneller, schneller!!!!"

The next time we were paired I said "can I ask you not to scream at me?"

"I do that?" he asked.

"Yes, when you're telling me it's my ball, or to move."

'Well, that's what partners do for each other," he said.

"Scream at each other?" I asked.

"You have an attitude that you don't like me," he said. (true)

"We can talk about it after class if you'd like," I said.

(frosty silence)

He doesn't yell at me anymore, in fact, he doesn't speak to me at all.

What is wrong with people??? This is a clinic jesus christ on a crutch!

That's priceless. That's exactly like the occasional characters Ive encountered in my drills.

And it's always the same, if you say something to them about not yelling at you while you're trying to hit it, they try to say "It's doubles! Im supposed to communicate....".

Getting them to get mad at you and not want to talk to you at least means you've successfully gotten them to stop yelling. :-) The reality is sometimes people just dont get along and if you have an understanding about that it's usually for the best in the long run.

There was one guy that was just like that and worse. When we had a line drill where we took turns playing out singles points and he was next in line. He would stand RIGHT on the baseline, so if my opponent hit a ball near there he was in my way.

I asked him to stand back a bit because he was in my way and he said. "No problem, Im okay here!"

So then on one shot I actually had to shove him out of the way so I could get to a ball. (he was a bigger chubbier guy so I didnt feel too badly about pushing him out of the way without knocking him down, if he was a little guy I probably would of felt bad about it)

Klaus
11-12-2009, 01:56 PM
I would have pushed him down Javier.

Why wouldn't he just move? Why do people have to be so obstinate?

This is supposed to be fun. The agression is unbelievable. When I asked a former clinician one time not to shout as someone hits a ball in a deliberate effort to screw them up--he immediately tried to hit me with the ball. Finally the pro had to take him aside and calm him down, and told him that he was out of line.

Aren't there better sports these malcontents can play? Rugby, soccer, jai ali??

JavierLW
11-12-2009, 02:18 PM
I would have pushed him down Javier.

Why wouldn't he just move? Why do people have to be so obstinate?

This is supposed to be fun. The agression is unbelievable. When I asked a former clinician one time not to shout as someone hits a ball in a deliberate effort to screw them up--he immediately tried to hit me with the ball. Finally the pro had to take him aside and calm him down, and told him that he was out of line.

Aren't there better sports these malcontents can play? Rugby, soccer, jai ali??

Yes, it's amazing that usually they are some big important butt doctor or something (that's the case with this guy).

They probably spend all day with people walking on egg shells around them so they feel that nothing they do is wrong.

They should play a game called "smear the expletive".

Basically the whole object of the game is to try to get the ball, and then everyone else trys to tackle the person with the ball. No other rules really besides that. (smart players actually do not try to get the ball, or they hand it off if they do get it! :-) )

Cindysphinx
11-12-2009, 04:10 PM
Your friend says Wednesday? Now that's strange. :confused:

I don't speak Spanish, but even I knew she was yelling "Wednesday," so I asked her about it. Apparently there is a Spanish swear word that sounds like Miercoles. So she was, um, substituting.

So now you know how to quasi-swear in Spanish, Xisbum.

You're welcome! :)

beernutz
11-12-2009, 04:40 PM
I would have pushed him down Javier.

Why wouldn't he just move? Why do people have to be so obstinate?

This is supposed to be fun. The agression is unbelievable. When I asked a former clinician one time not to shout as someone hits a ball in a deliberate effort to screw them up--he immediately tried to hit me with the ball. Finally the pro had to take him aside and calm him down, and told him that he was out of line.

Aren't there better sports these malcontents can play? Rugby, soccer, jai ali??

You forgot poker. Other than that I agree with you completely.

Mdubb23
11-12-2009, 05:04 PM
I once played an irish kid guy, at 40-30, would call "fartee-thartee." It was pretty hysterical.

sureshs
11-13-2009, 07:10 AM
I've played with alot of guys who yell 'You!' instead of 'yours!'. It was pretty off-putting the first few times but i'm used to it now

"You" is quite common in pro doubles

sureshs
11-13-2009, 07:11 AM
I played against a woman who shouted "eat it" every time she hit a down the line winner. (I didn't understand the request.)

She was sending you some signals to find out your personal "tastes"

sureshs
11-13-2009, 07:18 AM
I hit with a guy recently who kept yelling "keep those forehands in the court, will you?" I was a bit ****ed off at the criticism, but since he was standing around and I was the one who asked if he wanted to hit, I kept quiet. Then I realized he was yelling at himself.

sureshs
11-13-2009, 07:22 AM
I play with a guy who has a routine whenever someone (other than him of course) is going for an overhead (his side or opponent does not matter). He starts singing "Boom ChuckaChuk Boom."

kelkat
11-15-2009, 05:15 PM
For our league match last wednesday, I partnered with a gal that I had never played a match with. Now, I have a pretty mean overhead, and every time I hit an overhead, SHE grunted. I about pee'd my pants the first time she did this. I make not a peep, and she grunts at the point of contact. Living vicariously, I guess. She does not grunt on her overhead. Too funny:)

rasajadad
11-16-2009, 06:50 AM
She was sending you some signals to find out your personal "tastes"

But how could I play in a neck brace! (Blatant "Curb Your Enthusiasm" reference.)

Cindysphinx
11-16-2009, 07:41 AM
I know one lady who, when her partner has a sitter, yells, "PUT IT AWAY!!!!!!!"

I find it very distracting to have someone yell that when I am about to hit my shot. There's more than one way to finish a point, and I might be setting up for a dink when she exhorts me to kill the ball.