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EikelBeiter
11-12-2009, 12:02 PM
A new coach at my club told me that when hitting a volley I have my arm too stretched out, which reduces power. So at the moment i'm trying to have it bent at the initiation of my volley and then stretch out. These are my old volleys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBolZQWnsaU

But now I've came across a video of Andy Murray while volleying and he seems to not even stretch out his arm during volley. He Seems to almost keep the bend in his arm on both backhand and forehand volleys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHgVJXmZs6c

I allready had some advice from BB regarding my volleys. But what would you think is the ideal way to volley? Have a bent arm and stretch it during the volley ? Or keep your arm slightly bent, like how Murray does it?

fruitytennis1
11-12-2009, 12:05 PM
Idk i think your volleys are good.

CallOfBooty
11-12-2009, 12:08 PM
you should definitely learn how to volley by keeping your arms slightly bent and keeping them close to your body. this way you have to use more of your legs to get to the ball instead of your arm. in a volley its always better to step to the ball rather than reach for the ball. also if you think about it this way, keep your arm extended and push against your string bed. then keep your arm closer to your body then push against your string bed. which one was harder to push? it should be the arm closer to your body. so you also have more stability in the volley when you get hit with a hard paced shot and have to volley it.

my coach had a really good way to practice this. when you are being drilled with volleys, keep one tennis ball underneath the armpit of the arm you volley with. if you are right handed, put a tennis ball underneath your right armpit. volley without letting the ball underneath your armpit drop, this will ensure you are using more of your legs instead of your arms to get to the volley

chico9166
11-12-2009, 12:14 PM
Don't change a thing.

EikelBeiter
11-12-2009, 12:33 PM
Don't change a thing.

Idk i think your volleys are good.

Thanks I'm not unhappy with my volleys but I am trying to improve them though.

you should definitely learn how to volley by keeping your arms slightly bent and keeping them close to your body. this way you have to use more of your legs to get to the ball instead of your arm. in a volley its always better to step to the ball rather than reach for the ball. also if you think about it this way, keep your arm extended and push against your string bed. then keep your arm closer to your body then push against your string bed. which one was harder to push? it should be the arm closer to your body. so you also have more stability in the volley when you get hit with a hard paced shot and have to volley it.

my coach had a really good way to practice this. when you are being drilled with volleys, keep one tennis ball underneath the armpit of the arm you volley with. if you are right handed, put a tennis ball underneath your right armpit. volley without letting the ball underneath your armpit drop, this will ensure you are using more of your legs instead of your arms to get to the volley

Yeah I know that drill I used it once to keep my arms closer to my body indeed. But that is not my problem anymore, I think I have that covered now.

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-12-2009, 12:41 PM
If they feel right and you can get them in keep it up and tell that coach to go get nevermind.

SystemicAnomaly
11-12-2009, 01:42 PM
If they feel right and you can get them in keep it up and tell that coach to go get nevermind.

This is probably not sound advice. Elbow bent and wrist laid back (esp for the FH) is the way to go. Pros hit this way most of the time for good, sound resaons. It is very possible that hitting most of your volleys with a straight arm may be very stressful to your joints -- wrist, elbow, & especially the shoulder. The arm is stronger and quicker when it is bent. Volleys are also more consistent.

Always use your legs to get you to balls that are out wide. Extending your arm instead of moving your feet sufficiently lead to consistency issues (as well as being more stressful to the shoulder). When the arm extends for wide balls, the shoulder tends to rotate the arm.

This rotation can be suppressed but quite often it will lead to errors. Quite often, as a result of the shoulder rotation, players will close the racquet face too much on FH volleys = volley goes into the net. When reaching/extending on the BH side, the shoulder rotation, if not suppressed, will cause the racquet face to open up too much = volleys pop up or sit up for the opponent.

SystemicAnomaly
11-12-2009, 02:06 PM
you should definitely learn how to volley by keeping your arms slightly bent and keeping them close to your body. this way you have to use more of your legs to get to the ball instead of your arm. in a volley its always better to step to the ball rather than reach for the ball. also if you think about it this way, keep your arm extended and push against your string bed. then keep your arm closer to your body then push against your string bed. which one was harder to push? it should be the arm closer to your body. so you also have more stability in the volley when you get hit with a hard paced shot and have to volley it.

my coach had a really good way to practice this. when you are being drilled with volleys, keep one tennis ball underneath the armpit of the arm you volley with. if you are right handed, put a tennis ball underneath your right armpit. volley without letting the ball underneath your armpit drop, this will ensure you are using more of your legs instead of your arms to get to the volley

Excellent suggestsions from CoB.

Just took a look at your video and saw a couple of things. Your volleys are very decent and your footwork is pretty good as well. However, there a a few minor points to consider. Try to keep the racquet more neutral in your ready position. Sometimes you have it skewed toward the BH side -- this will require you to take longer to set up for a FH volley. while this skewed "ready" is ok at the baseline, it can cost you some time on the FH when you are closer to the net.

When you get jammed (on either side), try not to step backward so much (yes, I know that Andy M does it once in a while). Instead, try to more your opposite foot forward and to the side (diagonally). In some cases, it might be helpful to first bring the feet together and then take that forward diagonal step with the opposite foot.

When jammed on the FH, that forward diagonal step is taken with the left foot. When jammed on the BH side that last diagonal step forward is taken with the right foot. With this footwork change you will always be moving your weight toward the net on your volley instead of falling backward or to the side. It should also make your recoveries a bit quicker.
.

EikelBeiter
11-12-2009, 02:09 PM
This is probably not sound advice. Elbow bent and wrist laid back (esp for the FH) is the way to go. Pros hit this way most of the time for good, sound resaons. It is very possible that hitting most of your volleys with a straight arm may be very stressful to your joints -- wrist, elbow, & especially the shoulder. The arm is stronger and quicker when it is bent. Volleys are also more consistent.

Always use your legs to get you to balls that are out wide. Extending your arm instead of moving your feet sufficiently lead to consistency issues (as well as being more stressful to the shoulder). When the arm extends for wide balls, the shoulder tends to rotate the arm.

This rotation can be suppressed but quite often it will lead to errors. Quite often, as a result of the shoulder rotation, players will close the racquet face too much on FH volleys = volley goes into the net. When reaching/extending on the BH side, the shoulder rotation, if not suppressed, will cause the racquet face to open up too much = volleys pop up or sit up for the opponent.

Ok, so you are saying that in the ideal volley you have your arm bent, and then keep it bent throughout the shot? Exactly as Murray does it thus?

That coach told me to have it bent at the initiation of the volley and stretch it during the shot.

nabrug
11-12-2009, 02:16 PM
A new coach at my club told me that when hitting a volley I have my arm too stretched out, which reduces power. So at the moment i'm trying to have it bent at the initiation of my volley and then stretch out. These are my old volleys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBolZQWnsaU

But now I've came across a video of Andy Murray while volleying and he seems to not even stretch out his arm during volley. He Seems to almost keep the bend in his arm on both backhand and forehand volleys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHgVJXmZs6c

I allready had some advice from BB regarding my volleys. But what would you think is the ideal way to volley? Have a bent arm and stretch it during the volley ? Or keep your arm slightly bent, like how Murray does it?

Dat is geen GBA coach! Waarom zou je in deze (volgens mij nooit voorkomende) spelsituatie een nog betere volley willen slaan? Ik ben tennisdocent en vraag me eerst af welke spelsituatie je niet of niet voldoende beheerst. Want net als met de FH er bestaat niet 1 volley, maar meerdere.

Translation: That is not a GBA coach! Why should you want to play a better volley in this (imo not excisting) game situation? I just want to know in which real game situation you are not able to make which volley? Because like with the FH there is not just one volley but several.

SystemicAnomaly
11-12-2009, 02:20 PM
Ok, so you are saying that in the ideal volley you have your arm bent, and then keep it bent throughout the shot? Exactly as Murray does it thus?

That coach told me to have it bent at the initiation of the volley and stretch it during the shot.

I was talking about the arm bent at initiation and at contct time. If the arms straighten some time after contact has been made, it might be ok. If the arm straightening affects the quality of your contact, try to delay it or eliminate it.

LeeD
11-12-2009, 03:32 PM
I say keep the elbow bent thru the stroke, which brings the body into play, and all the momentum that gives.
Straightening the elbow isolates the armstroke, so any forward body motion does little except cause inconsistencies.
If your volley is strong and solid, higher than your 6.0 game, use it.
If you think your volley could use more consistency and easier pace, then keep the elbow bent thru the stroke.

W Cats
11-12-2009, 03:43 PM
I may be wrong about this, not he first time, but the primary reason of hitting volleys with a straightened arm, especially bkhd, is to stabilize the arm and reduce the chances of changing the face and path of the racquet. It's just one less hinge to worry about when stroking or attacking the volley. Some people can do this succesfully with a bent arm and others can't. When reviewing Andy Murray's vid that you posted one can see that he does and exceptional job at keeping the angle of his elbow bend constant, through to the end of his follow through.:):)

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-12-2009, 03:55 PM
True keep your elbow bent I just meant to emphasis to keep it simple and based on feel.

papa
11-12-2009, 04:31 PM
I like the arm/elbow into the body on the FH volley but extended on the BH. Keeping the arm bent is easier of course on both sides - straight arm volley isn't a piece of cake at any level.

EikelBeiter
11-13-2009, 01:54 AM
I say keep the elbow bent thru the stroke, which brings the body into play, and all the momentum that gives.
Straightening the elbow isolates the armstroke, so any forward body motion does little except cause inconsistencies.
If your volley is strong and solid, higher than your 6.0 game, use it.
If you think your volley could use more consistency and easier pace, then keep the elbow bent thru the stroke.

I think it could be more consistant, so i'm gonna go ahead and try to change it.

EikelBeiter
11-13-2009, 01:54 AM
Excellent suggestsions from CoB.

Just took a look at your video and saw a couple of things. Your volleys are very decent and your footwork is pretty good as well. However, there a a few minor points to consider. Try to keep the racquet more neutral in your ready position. Sometimes you have it skewed toward the BH side -- this will require you to take longer to set up for a FH volley. while this skewed "ready" is ok at the baseline, it can cost you some time on the FH when you are closer to the net.

When you get jammed (on either side), try not to step backward so much (yes, I know that Andy M does it once in a while). Instead, try to more your opposite foot forward and to the side (diagonally). In some cases, it might be helpful to first bring the feet together and then take that forward diagonal step with the opposite foot.

When jammed on the FH, that forward diagonal step is taken with the left foot. When jammed on the BH side that last diagonal step forward is taken with the right foot. With this footwork change you will always be moving your weight toward the net on your volley instead of falling backward or to the side. It should also make your recoveries a bit quicker.
.

Thanks for the advice and well spotted. I do have a tendency to fall a little bit back too far, this also goes for my groundies. I'm working on that.

I'm going to try to keep my arm bent a little and keep it bent during the volley.

Dat is geen GBA coach! Waarom zou je in deze (volgens mij nooit voorkomende) spelsituatie een nog betere volley willen slaan? Ik ben tennisdocent en vraag me eerst af welke spelsituatie je niet of niet voldoende beheerst. Want net als met de FH er bestaat niet 1 volley, maar meerdere.

Translation: That is not a GBA coach! Why should you want to play a better volley in this (imo not excisting) game situation? I just want to know in which real game situation you are not able to make which volley? Because like with the FH there is not just one volley but several.

She was talking about the general volleying technique. That I have my arm straightened too much to begin with. I don't really have a problem with a specific game situation, just trying to improve my volley in general

LeeD
11-13-2009, 11:29 AM
Oh, I meant to hit the volley with slightly bent elbow...mostly the same bend on every volley you can normally reach...but after hitting the ball, you can fully extend for a high followthru IF YOU WANT. Lots of great volleyers ended their stroke low in the '70's. Nowadays, most volleyers followthru high AFTER the volley, maybe for better volley and extention into the court.

EikelBeiter
11-13-2009, 01:29 PM
^^^^

Hit a few hours today and keeping the elbow bent throughout the volley feels very unnatural. But I suppose every change feels unnatural. Having the elbow bent at contact and then stretching it out feels a bit better i must say.

papa
11-13-2009, 02:32 PM
^^^^

Hit a few hours today and keeping the elbow bent throughout the volley feels very unnatural. But I suppose every change feels unnatural. Having the elbow bent at contact and then stretching it out feels a bit better i must say.

Careful here because you want so backspin on the volley and if you keep the arm bent without any straightening whatsoever your not going to be hitting the ball correctly. Just be careful of the ball under the armpit advice also --- on the backhand the elbow should be high.

Bungalo Bill
11-13-2009, 02:48 PM
^^^^

Hit a few hours today and keeping the elbow bent throughout the volley feels very unnatural. But I suppose every change feels unnatural. Having the elbow bent at contact and then stretching it out feels a bit better i must say.

I had a hard time understanding what you meant. So, I took a break and sort of watched the posts. I think I uinderstand now.

You are talking about your arm extension after you make contact through the ball.

Your extension is not bad, however, it can cover-up a lack of knee bend on low balls. Good technique needs to happen at all areas of your body including your knee area. The proper lowering and raising of your butt is part of having good technique. So although you may compensate for lower balls by extending at the arm some, the technique used in your legs could be compromised.

For lower balls you need more knee bend. Your legs should be considered first before you volley. You want to make sure your volleying from the shoulder as the main hinge in the swing like you see from Andy Murray.

Here is the deal about the elbow and arm. The reason you keep your elbow in and your arm sort of bent is because you are trying to elminate too much elbow roll which can alter the face of the racquet at contact and your control of the racquet head. You see Andy Murray in practice disciplining himself in volley practice keeping the elbow in more and using his legs (movement and bending his knees) to get the racquet in position and at the right height to field the volley. He is also making his volleys from the shoulder.

Additionally, I was doing a study on the slice backhand in which Federer extended through the shot in a clockwise manner. Perhaps you are doing sort of the same.

EikelBeiter
11-14-2009, 08:01 AM
Careful here because you want so backspin on the volley and if you keep the arm bent without any straightening whatsoever your not going to be hitting the ball correctly. Just be careful of the ball under the armpit advice also --- on the backhand the elbow should be high.

It looks like murray does not straighten the arm after impact at all, but perhaps it's just difficult to see

EikelBeiter
11-14-2009, 08:06 AM
I had a hard time understanding what you meant. So, I took a break and sort of watched the posts. I think I uinderstand now.

You are talking about your arm extension after you make contact through the ball.


Yes that is correct. Since my arm is too straight at this point, I'm trying to bent it more whilst volleying.
Now i'm just trying to figure out what is better, keeping it bent after contact (like Murray) or stretching it out more.


Your extension is not bad, however, it can cover-up a lack of knee bend on low balls. Good technique needs to happen at all areas of your body including your knee area. The proper lowering and raising of your butt is part of having good technique. So although you may compensate for lower balls by extending at the arm some, the technique used in your legs could be compromised.

For lower balls you need more knee bend. Your legs should be considered first before you volley. You want to make sure your volleying from the shoulder as the main hinge in the swing like you see from Andy Murray.

Here is the deal about the elbow and arm. The reason you keep your elbow in and your arm sort of bent is because you are trying to elminate too much elbow roll which can alter the face of the racquet at contact and your control of the racquet head. You see Andy Murray in practice disciplining himself in volley practice keeping the elbow in more and using his legs (movement and bending his knees) to get the racquet in position and at the right height to field the volley. He is also making his volleys from the shoulder.

Additionally, I was doing a study on the slice backhand in which Federer extended through the shot in a clockwise manner. Perhaps you are doing sort of the same.

I don't think i have a lot of extension at this point. My arm is fairly straight though, but that is only because my arm is too straight at the initiation of the volley. So what i'm trying is to bent my arm more and then either fully extend it, or don't extend it at all (like Murray). Hope I'm making sense :-?

papa
11-14-2009, 01:42 PM
It looks like murray does not straighten the arm after impact at all, but perhaps it's just difficult to see

My memory is that Murray has a very good volley - I'll do some checking and get back. Now it might be that he uses a fairly straight arm to begin with but I'll take a look.

papa
11-14-2009, 02:02 PM
ok, looked at some of Murray's vollies - maybe five or six. There certainly is extension. Just because he doesn't get his arm absolutely straight doesn't mean he isn't extending - the racquet follows the ball on a slightly downward path toward the target. You need this to keep the ball low after it bounces. I don't see anything unusual about his volley to be quite frank about it - maybe you can see something I can't.

Bungalo Bill
11-15-2009, 04:51 PM
Yes that is correct. Since my arm is too straight at this point, I'm trying to bent it more whilst volleying.
Now i'm just trying to figure out what is better, keeping it bent after contact (like Murray) or stretching it out more.



I don't think i have a lot of extension at this point. My arm is fairly straight though, but that is only because my arm is too straight at the initiation of the volley. So what i'm trying is to bent my arm more and then either fully extend it, or don't extend it at all (like Murray). Hope I'm making sense :-?

We have to make sure we are seeing and talking about the same thing. I am not talking about going through the ball. I am looking at what your amr is doing from the elbow down. I am looking at the arm going from a bent position, then brings the racquet to contact, and then whether the arm straightening out or extending.

You indeed straighten the arm in the followthrough especially on the backhand side. When you do this you are swinging the racquet from the shoulder and then the elbow. At times, this is okay because it gives you that extra feel. However, too much of it and you might get lazy in the legs and just drop your racquet to hit the ball and compromise your vision and timing.

You want to have a stroke like Murray where he is fielding the ball with his legs and feet and swinging clearly from the shoulder ands therefore has limited arm extension. On some of the backhand volleys there was hardly any extension and he simply maintained the U arm-shape that was established in his preparation.

I guess now I am getting confused. Do you want to keep what you have or change towards Murray? If you want the latter, then my advice is sufficient.

LeeD
11-15-2009, 05:19 PM
Some old Asian saying about the slightly bent arm is stronger than the locked or straight one. Same with legs.
All athletics you try to stay just bent, but maybe as tall as possible (talking legs). Goes for gungfo, karate, football, basketball, fencing and volleys.

EikelBeiter
11-16-2009, 03:27 AM
I guess now I am getting confused. Do you want to keep what you have or change towards Murray? If you want the latter, then my advice is sufficient.

I want to change a bit towards Murray, so keeping my arm bent throughout the volley. Thanks for the advice!

ttbrowne
11-16-2009, 06:28 AM
Careful here because you want so backspin on the volley and if you keep the arm bent without any straightening whatsoever your not going to be hitting the ball correctly. Just be careful of the ball under the armpit advice also --- on the backhand the elbow should be high.

Papa, I thought that too but I learned that you should hit from top of the ball to bottom on a volley. NOT just meet the ball. It's not a big chop and it's tricky but this player has the ability to do it.

papa
11-16-2009, 11:26 AM
Papa, I thought that too but I learned that you should hit from top of the ball to bottom on a volley. NOT just meet the ball. It's not a big chop and it's tricky but this player has the ability to do it.

Well, not that I won't listen, but I think I can volley quite nicely that you. I would never use a phrase like "chop at the ball" or some of the ones you use. The racquet MUST go with a little bit of a top to bottom path to give it a little backspin.

papa
11-16-2009, 11:27 AM
.......quite nicely thank you. ................

number.432
11-16-2009, 11:32 AM
Just wanted to tell you that your form in the forecourt looks pretty good. I don't have any specifics to offer but I do think that if anything it's only minor alteration/addition to your existing anticipation/technique.

Thanks for sharing.

EikelBeiter
11-16-2009, 12:22 PM
Just wanted to tell you that your form in the forecourt looks pretty good. I don't have any specifics to offer but I do think that if anything it's only minor alteration/addition to your existing anticipation/technique.

Thanks for sharing.

Thanks for the compliment.

I'm working on keeping the elbow bent throughout the shot, kinda like Murray

number.432
11-16-2009, 12:41 PM
Thanks for the compliment.

I'm working on keeping the elbow bent throughout the shot, kinda like Murray


I haven't had time to watch/read this entire thread. But from what I skimmed through I certainly can relate to this. We are all used to taking a considerable swing at the ball which I think consequently lead to your elbow not remaining in 'V' shape through contact point. OR just think 'it's a punch not a hit' might help also. Less is more is the way to go particularly in the forecourt!

Will watch/read/weigh in more later.

ttbrowne
11-16-2009, 06:02 PM
Well, not that I won't listen, but I think I can volley quite nicely that you. I would never use a phrase like "chop at the ball" or some of the ones you use. The racquet MUST go with a little bit of a top to bottom path to give it a little backspin.

Dayyyyum, Whooo Eeee.....Excuse me all over the place, Mr. Hall-of-Famer. I bow to your wisdom and use of tennitec terms.

chico9166
11-17-2009, 03:04 AM
Eikel,

On no other shot in tennis is there such a variance in incoming ball characteristics. The contact point can be anywhere from shoelace to over the head. The ball could be moving 10 miles an hour or 70. Balls can be hit in your wheelhouse, or literally at full stretch. As such, the mark of a good volleyer is how well they shape the hitting structure, and swing path to adapt to the shot at hand.

Most good volleyer's bend the elbow as they set the unit turn. Generally, if they can find the ball in there wheelhouse, the elbow angle will stay relatively contstant, as the hitting struture is rotated forward as a unit, via the shoulder. This is always the best option, and where the legs really come into play. You have to move, and make this optimal contact point happen.

But, and this is a big but. This doesn't always happen, especially at your level, as the ball is all over the place. I really think trying to force certain arm configurations(straight/straight, bent/straight, bent/bent) is going to lead you down the wrong path, and a case of "can't see the forest for the trees". Bend the elbow as you set the turn, and then focus on trying to get the ball to do what you want it to do. i.e. shape the shot, based on the ball your confronted with.

My 02 cents.

papa
11-17-2009, 04:25 AM
Dayyyyum, Whooo Eeee.....Excuse me all over the place, Mr. Hall-of-Famer. I bow to your wisdom and use of tennitec terms.

Sorry, not trying to belittle your knowledge of the game and realize you, like most, are here to share their thoughts. Sometimes players are trying to make this game tougher than it really is and then, confusion seems to take over.

papa
11-17-2009, 04:27 AM
Eikel,

On no other shot in tennis is there such a variance in incoming ball characteristics. The contact point can be anywhere from shoelace to over the head. The ball could be moving 10 miles an hour or 70. Balls can be hit in your wheelhouse, or literally at full stretch. As such, the mark of a good volleyer is how well they shape the hitting structure, and swing path to adapt to the shot at hand.

Most good volleyer's bend the elbow as they set the unit turn. Generally, if they can find the ball in there wheelhouse, the elbow angle will stay relatively contstant, as the hitting struture is rotated forward as a unit, via the shoulder. This is always the best option, and where the legs really come into play. You have to move, and make this optimal contact point happen.

But, and this is a big but. This doesn't always happen, espicially at your level, as the ball is all over the place. I really think trying to force certain arm configurations(straight/straight, bent/straight, bent/bent) is going to lead you down the wrong path, and a case of "can't see the forest for the trees". Bend the elbow as you set the turn, and then focus on trying to get the ball to do what you want it to do. i.e. shape the shot, based on the ball your confronted with.

My 02 cents.

Well said.

EikelBeiter
11-17-2009, 06:37 AM
Eikel,

On no other shot in tennis is there such a variance in incoming ball characteristics. The contact point can be anywhere from shoelace to over the head. The ball could be moving 10 miles an hour or 70. Balls can be hit in your wheelhouse, or literally at full stretch. As such, the mark of a good volleyer is how well they shape the hitting structure, and swing path to adapt to the shot at hand.

Most good volleyer's bend the elbow as they set the unit turn. Generally, if they can find the ball in there wheelhouse, the elbow angle will stay relatively contstant, as the hitting struture is rotated forward as a unit, via the shoulder. This is always the best option, and where the legs really come into play. You have to move, and make this optimal contact point happen.

But, and this is a big but. This doesn't always happen, especially at your level, as the ball is all over the place. I really think trying to force certain arm configurations(straight/straight, bent/straight, bent/bent) is going to lead you down the wrong path, and a case of "can't see the forest for the trees". Bend the elbow as you set the turn, and then focus on trying to get the ball to do what you want it to do. i.e. shape the shot, based on the ball your confronted with.

My 02 cents.

That makes sense, I'll keep it in mind

jrod
11-17-2009, 06:52 AM
Eikel,

On no other shot in tennis is there such a variance in incoming ball characteristics. The contact point can be anywhere from shoelace to over the head. The ball could be moving 10 miles an hour or 70. Balls can be hit in your wheelhouse, or literally at full stretch. As such, the mark of a good volleyer is how well they shape the hitting structure, and swing path to adapt to the shot at hand.

Most good volleyer's bend the elbow as they set the unit turn. Generally, if they can find the ball in there wheelhouse, the elbow angle will stay relatively contstant, as the hitting struture is rotated forward as a unit, via the shoulder. This is always the best option, and where the legs really come into play. You have to move, and make this optimal contact point happen.

But, and this is a big but. This doesn't always happen, especially at your level, as the ball is all over the place. I really think trying to force certain arm configurations(straight/straight, bent/straight, bent/bent) is going to lead you down the wrong path, and a case of "can't see the forest for the trees". Bend the elbow as you set the turn, and then focus on trying to get the ball to do what you want it to do. i.e. shape the shot, based on the ball your confronted with.

My 02 cents.


I agree. However, I think BB makes a valid point on the use of the legs. The OP should see improvement if he can engage his lower body more and get in a better position to stick the volley. As you correctly point out this is not always possible but there is room for improvement.

chico9166
11-17-2009, 07:20 AM
I agree. However, I think BB makes a valid point on the use of the legs. The OP should see improvement if he can engage his lower body more and get in a better position to stick the volley. As you correctly point out this is not always possible but there is room for improvement.

Very true. One could never practice moving on the ball enough.

EikelBeiter
11-17-2009, 07:44 AM
I agree. However, I think BB makes a valid point on the use of the legs. The OP should see improvement if he can engage his lower body more and get in a better position to stick the volley. As you correctly point out this is not always possible but there is room for improvement.

Footwork can also be improved indeed.

Slazenger07
11-17-2009, 08:59 AM
I believe that doing as little as possible and staying out in front of the ball are the keys to hitting good volleys. Obviously you need to keep the racquet head up and the wrist firm, but apart from that there's not too much to it. Maybe make a slight extension as you make contact with the volley, but you dont need much. Less is more when talking about the volley.

papa
11-17-2009, 10:53 AM
I believe that doing as little as possible and staying out in front of the ball are the keys to hitting good volleys. Obviously you need to keep the racquet head up and the wrist firm, but apart from that there's not too much to it. Maybe make a slight extension as you make contact with the volley, but you dont need much. Less is more when talking about the volley.

Excellent post.

EikelBeiter
11-18-2009, 09:21 AM
I believe that doing as little as possible and staying out in front of the ball are the keys to hitting good volleys. Obviously you need to keep the racquet head up and the wrist firm, but apart from that there's not too much to it. Maybe make a slight extension as you make contact with the volley, but you dont need much. Less is more when talking about the volley.

Less is more? You mean less footwork is more ? :)

But i get your point. Though i'm trying to keep the arm a little more bent though throughout the volley.