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slopoke
11-13-2009, 04:26 PM
Hope you will learn from my mistakes. Here are some suggestions.

Protect yourself from the sun..try to avoid being on court between 11am and 4pm..wear protective clothing including a cap/hat...use a good sun block. Skin cancer is not fun.

Take care of your body..use a thera band to keep the rotator cuff (both shoulders) strong...use a thera band flex bar the keep the wrists and forearms strong and to help in avoiding tennis elbow. Do some weight lifting but don't over do it.

Keep your weight down...more calories in than out means weight gain. Pick up a 10 pound weight and imagine that strapped around your middle...extra weight is hard on your heart, hard on your knees and bad for your endurance.

Do some cardio...regular jogging, swimming and/or cycling is good for your tennis and overall health.

Tennis is a life time sport.
slopoke

yemenmocha
11-13-2009, 04:51 PM
Simple good advice but often not followed. Always worth the reminder. Thanks.

borg number one
11-13-2009, 05:23 PM
Thank you sir. Great reminders. I say many of the same things myself to all my friends and I'm probably a "pain", but that's great advice! Sometimes, I feel like I am ALREADY at least starting to "sound" like an old guy. I'm now just over 40.

I especially liked your reminders as to the sun and calories. All the best to you. I think it's great that you've made tennis a lifetime sport. I have always planned to do the very same thing.

slopoke
11-13-2009, 06:07 PM
I've followed some of my own advice. Unfortunately, I did not know the dangers of sun exposure and did not know about sun screen in time.
slopoke

makenakai
11-13-2009, 06:19 PM
I might add.

Work lightly on gliding footwork
Do balance work
Do relaxation work
Do timing practice
Smooth our everything

all this is Practice that is more productive with no physical cost. The point is to have fun longer.

56 and still enjoying tusslin' w the youngsters regular like.

makenakai
11-13-2009, 06:19 PM
oops.. smooth OUT everything..

slopoke
11-13-2009, 06:22 PM
I especially like the part about fun. Be all that you can be but be sure you have fun along the way.

OTMPut
11-13-2009, 11:34 PM
I've followed some of my own advice. Unfortunately, I did not know the dangers of sun exposure and did not know about sun screen in time.
slopoke

You ok? That "unfortunately" word makes me feel a bit uncomfortable.

slopoke
11-14-2009, 03:31 AM
You ok? That "unfortunately" word makes me feel a bit uncomfortable.

Unfortunately...I've been dealing with skin cancer for years.

Fortunately...it has been mostly basal cell with a few squemous (?) cell.

Really not a big deal because I get checked every four months. (The ones on the nose are the worst.)

I'm trying to get word out to everyone to take precautions.

gzhpcu
11-14-2009, 04:20 AM
I do 20 minutes on my excercise bike every morning, followed by 8 sets of 40 pushups, and then a bit of stretching. I play about 10 hours of tennis a week. Am 64. :)

slopoke
11-14-2009, 04:33 AM
I do 20 minutes on my excercise bike every morning, followed by 8 sets of 40 pushups, and then a bit of stretching. I play about 10 hours of tennis a week. Am 64. :)

I am not easily impressed, but that impresses me.

charliefedererer
11-14-2009, 07:38 AM
Hope you will learn from my mistakes. Here are some suggestions.

Protect yourself from the sun..try to avoid being on court between 11am and 4pm..wear protective clothing including a cap/hat...use a good sun block. Skin cancer is not fun.

Take care of your body..use a thera band to keep the rotator cuff (both shoulders) strong...use a thera band flex bar the keep the wrists and forearms strong and to help in avoiding tennis elbow. Do some weight lifting but don't over do it.

Keep your weight down...more calories in than out means weight gain. Pick up a 10 pound weight and imagine that strapped around your middle...extra weight is hard on your heart, hard on your knees and bad for your endurance.

Do some cardio...regular jogging, swimming and/or cycling is good for your tennis and overall health.

Tennis is a life time sport.
slopoke

Thank you for your overall advice.
I would think taking the over 90 singles title at the Senior Olympics a far better achievement than winning Wimbledon. Thankfully, I still have 40 years to prepare. (And with my game I am going to need that time.)
But I am concerned that my dad gave up competitive tennis at 79 because he just lost his quickness to get to the ball because of his knees, and I wonder what the best balance between playing and knee health is. His time on the tennis courts undoubtedly contributed to the multiple basal cell skin cancers on exposed areas of the face, neck and arms. So your advice is appreciated.
But I do have some questions for you regarding the use of the Flexbar. Do you use it often and do you think it has specific advantages over arm work involving weights, dumbells and elastic tubing? It clearly is not that expensive, and I have been thinking of getting one to add to my routine.

slopoke
11-14-2009, 07:50 AM
Thank you for your overall advice.
I would think taking the over 90 singles title at the Senior Olympics a far better achievement than winning Wimbledon. Thankfully, I still have 40 years to prepare. (And with my game I am going to need that time.)
But I am concerned that my dad gave up competitive tennis at 79 because he just lost his quickness to get to the ball because of his knees, and I wonder what the best balance between playing and knee health is. His time on the tennis courts undoubtedly contributed to the multiple basal cell skin cancers on exposed areas of the face, neck and arms. So your advice is appreciated.
But I do have some questions for you regarding the use of the Flexbar. Do you use it often and do you think it has specific advantages over arm work involving weights, dumbells and elastic tubing? It clearly is not that expensive, and I have been thinking of getting one to add to my routine.

My suggestion for knees is play on the clay.

I bought the blue green mid-range flex bar. I have wrist and elbow problems. It's too early to give a thumbs up for me but others have suggested that it's the way to go. Maybe some one else can give us a success story.

slepax
11-15-2009, 07:07 AM
Protect yourself from the sun..try to avoid being on court between 11am and 4pm..wear protective clothing including a cap/hat...use a good sun block. Skin cancer is not fun.

Taking this a bit further .. I was always intrigued, are there many cases of professional tennis players with skin cancer? They spend a lot of their time outside in the sun, either playing a match or doing practice.

What do they do to avoid skin cancer?

BounceHitBounceHit
11-15-2009, 08:15 AM
Hope you will learn from my mistakes. Here are some suggestions.

Protect yourself from the sun..try to avoid being on court between 11am and 4pm..wear protective clothing including a cap/hat...use a good sun block. Skin cancer is not fun.

Take care of your body..use a thera band to keep the rotator cuff (both shoulders) strong...use a thera band flex bar the keep the wrists and forearms strong and to help in avoiding tennis elbow. Do some weight lifting but don't over do it.

Keep your weight down...more calories in than out means weight gain. Pick up a 10 pound weight and imagine that strapped around your middle...extra weight is hard on your heart, hard on your knees and bad for your endurance.

Do some cardio...regular jogging, swimming and/or cycling is good for your tennis and overall health.

Tennis is a life time sport.
slopoke

Amen. :) BHBH

Geezer Guy
11-15-2009, 10:11 AM
I'm no expert on skin cancer, but I have a friend that's in his 60's and has a bit of skin cancer on his ear. I asked him if it was from all his time out walking his mail route (he's a postman). He said that his Dr. told him it was from when he was working in the fields in his teens. He said that you get the beginnings of skin cancer as a kid, and it just grows over time. He said that once you reach adulthood there's nothing you can do about it. You're either going to get it or your not (based on what you did as a kid).

IF that's true, your advice is still good for youths - but a little late for the rest of us. No qualms with your other points though.

slopoke
11-15-2009, 10:35 AM
I believe that sun damage of the skin accumulates over time and is based on total time of exposure. I don't doubt that exposure in our childhood and teens is a big factor. Skin color/pigmentation matters too. So called "northern European" skin is probably most vulnerable. Cancer takes time to develop. My first was at age 38. My children all have sun damage. Growing up in Florida did not help.