PDA

View Full Version : Women: Your Input On Clinics and Programs


SFrazeur
11-15-2009, 05:10 PM
I'm looking to increase my new/beginner player participation with women. I was wondering what sort of program would attract you? Including language on fliers, class descriptions, times, length of sessions and the like. As well as where the best places to advertise or post fliers would be?

1) As a beginner or new player what kind of general focus of a class description would have attracted you?

A fun, social outlet?
A fun exercise outlet wrapped in a Tennis Banner?
A technical focus on leaning Tennis?


2) What starting time during the day would be best to start a Class/Clinic?
(I'm in the central time zone.)

9:00am-9:30am
10:00am-10:30am
6:00pm-6:30pm
7:00pm-7:30pm
Or would you attend an hour long class during lunch once or twice a week?

3) How many weeks? 4, 5, 6 weeks, etc.

4) What would be an ideal and what would be an acceptable price point for you for a month long program? $20-25, $30-35, $40-45, $50, etc.


Thank you for your time,

-SF

Cindysphinx
11-15-2009, 06:27 PM
I'm looking to increase my new/beginner player participation with women. I was wondering what sort of program would attract you? Including language on fliers, class descriptions, times, length of sessions and the like. As well as where the best places to advertise or post fliers would be?



I started playing tennis in clinics for beginners. They weren't limited to women, but they were on weekday mornings so there were no men. I'll answer based on the way I felt about tennis back then, not now.

1) As a beginner or new player what kind of general focus of a class description would have attracted you?

A fun, social outlet?
A fun exercise outlet wrapped in a Tennis Banner?
A technical focus on leaning Tennis?



Mmmm, none of the above.

I think the thing that would have attracted me most back then was learning to play the game as quickly as possible so I could start playing with friends. Most of all, I wanted to stop knocking the ball over the back fence, as that tends to be a drag for everyone. I wasn't that interested in the exercise component because I already exercised and tennis clinics for beginners necessarily involve a lot of standing around.

So I guess I'd advertise it as "Learn quickly so you can start playing!"

2) What starting time during the day would be best to start a Class/Clinic?
(I'm in the central time zone.)

9:00am-9:30am
10:00am-10:30am
6:00pm-6:30pm
7:00pm-7:30pm
Or would you attend an hour long class during lunch once or twice a week?



Trying to do a class or exercise during the lunch hour was always a nightmare for me when I worked. It seemed someone always called me or demanded a meeting and I couldn't get away. If I could get away, I would have to get there, do the class, shower/hair/make-up, and get back to the office. Just didn't work.

I would guess the most fruitful market is the mom who doesn't work outside the home or who has flexible hours. Those women tend to be available during school hours, which vary from area to area. Around here, women with school-age children tend to be available from 9-2:30.

Class duration should be at least 90 minutes.

My first classes were one hour, 8 women, one instructor, one court. Not very efficient. I'm going to travel 20-30 minutes each way, so I don't want the commute to be longer than the class.

If you can figure out a way for the students to have court access (for an extra fee) to continue playing for one hour after the class, that would be wonderful.


3) How many weeks? 4, 5, 6 weeks, etc.


Four weeks. That way you aren't making a huge commitment.

Make sure you have some advance registration system so that women who are already in your Session No. 1 get first crack at registering for Session No. 2. It is infuriating to be in a session only to get bumped out for the next session.


4) What would be an ideal and what would be an acceptable price point for you for a month long program? $20-25, $30-35, $40-45, $50, etc.

It depends on class length and number of students/instructors. In our area, I think paying $20-$25/hour for group instruction with no more than 4 students per instructor is pretty standard. I currently pay $35 for 1 instructor/4 students for 2 hours. That is the pro's low, summertime, outdoor rate. The club's rate for four-and-a-pro will likely be more like $45-$50.

Good luck!!

SFrazeur
11-15-2009, 07:09 PM
I started playing tennis in clinics for beginners. They weren't limited to women, but they were on weekday mornings so there were no men. I'll answer based on the way I felt about tennis back then, not now.

Cindy,

Thank you for your response, I was hoping your would. I have a few follow up questions if you have the time.


I wasn't that interested in the exercise component because I already exercised and tennis clinics for beginners necessarily involve a lot of standing around.

So I guess I'd advertise it as "Learn quickly so you can start playing!"


During a beginner lesson how would you have felt about doing agility, balance and footwork exercises, such as working with a ladder or medicine ball?


If you can figure out a way for the students to have court access (for an extra fee) to continue playing for one hour after the class, that would be wonderful.

Looking back, would you have preferred to have been able spend time after the clinic playing with the other students without constant input of an instructor? Or perhaps working for 1 hour with the instructor, and being left more to yourselves for the last 1/2 hour?

As well, do you have any feeling about a time frame of 2 hours for a lesson? Or what the opinion of other women would be? Is that too much even for daytime? I find that 1-1/2 hours is the most that people care to spend during the evening hours.

-SF

Cindysphinx
11-15-2009, 07:22 PM
Cindy,

Thank you for your response, I was hoping your would. I have a few follow up questions if you have the time.

Sure.

During a beginner lesson how would you have felt about doing agility, balance and footwork exercises, such as working with a ladder or medicine ball?

Oh, absolutely not!

As a beginner, I would have had no appreciation for such things. I mean, what on earth does agility, balance and footwork have to do with tennis? Yeah, it sounds dumb to ask that question now, but I wouldn't have had any idea why I was asked to run through a ladder. I would have been very annoyed by this.

If your classes will be anything like mine, what the students really needed was basic ball recognition practice. In my classes, hardly anyone could gauge the bounce of a ball. No kidding. Like, the instructor would feed a high ball to the middle of the court as the student waited at the baseline. Student was to run up and hit the ball. Student would overrun the ball every time and then stand shocked that it bounced way over her head.

No joke. I was the only one out of 8 students who could judge the flight of the ball a little bit. So if you are dealing with women who cannot tell where the ball is headed, all the footwork drills in the world won't help them.

Looking back, would you have preferred to have been able spend time after the clinic playing with the other students without constant input of an instructor? Or perhaps working for 1 hour with the instructor, and being left more to yourselves for the last 1/2 hour?

By far, the most fun part of the class was playing drills or games while the instructor watched. I just loved this. If you missed, you had someone to tell you what to do differently. If you hit a great shot, you had someone to applaud you. In our one-hour class, we only did drills/points for the last 15 minutes. It never felt like enough. So if you can do one hour of drills and 30 minutes of supervised play, that would be awesome. If that is not possible, then having the students play/practice what they have learned outside your presence is better than nothing.

Allow me to emphasize that during the whole time I took clinics with various clubs/programs, not once did any of us students leave and go practice (or get together and practice on our own). If you can facilitate or encourage that, it would probably be very welcome.

One problem you have as a beginner is that you don't have anyone to play with you, or if you do, their level is too high. If you can forge a bond among the women in your clinics, they will consider you to be Their Pro, and they will stick with you for years.

Ka-ching!

As well, do you have any feeling about a time frame of 2 hours for a lesson? Or what the opinion of other women would be? Is that too much even for daytime? I find that 1-1/2 hours is the most that people care to spend during the evening hours.

-SF

After I left that first clinic (1 hour, 1 pro, 8 women), I went to a different program. That one was 2 hours, 1 pro per court, max 4 women on a court. More money, of course.

That clinic started out with 20-30 minutes of warm-up and hitting, then instruction, then doubles games for the last 20 minutes or so. I liked this way of structuring things. If someone came late, they didn't affect the drills because we were just warming up and practicing and it was their loss. If you came on time, you got a lot of practice, sometimes with one of the pros.

That said, I think most people think 90 minutes is sufficient. For a couple of years, I did 3 and a pro for 90 minutes and found that sufficient. Now that we have taken our private clinic to 4 and a pro, we feel we need the full 2 hours. It's a loooong clinic, though . . . .

SFrazeur
11-15-2009, 07:38 PM
Cindy,

Thank you for your time answering my inane 25 yo male questions. I'll give what you've told me time to sink into my thick head.

-SF

lagniappe12
11-16-2009, 05:00 AM
1) As a beginner or new player what kind of general focus of a class description would have attracted you?

A fun, social outlet?
A fun exercise outlet wrapped in a Tennis Banner?
A technical focus on leaning Tennis?


Technical focus toward learning tennis. I learned tennis at an Adult Beginner 1-2-3 class that was really, really basic. I definitely would have never picked option 1, but possibly option 2.

I've participated in a "stroke clinic" a couple of times. It was four weeks long and each hour long session we focused on one stroke. FH, BH, volleys then serves. I absolutely loved it. The beginners clinic, like Cindy said, was a lot of standing around watching the pros explain how to hold a racket, how to get into ready position, etc. The stroke clinic, we hit a lot of balls, repetition helped a lot.

2) What starting time during the day would be best to start a Class/Clinic?
(I'm in the central time zone.)

9:00am-9:30am
10:00am-10:30am
6:00pm-6:30pm
7:00pm-7:30pm
Or would you attend an hour long class during lunch once or twice a week?

I work and live no where near my tennis club, so anything after say 5PM during the week or on the weekends works. I would not do a lunch hour one, even if there was one close by.

3) How many weeks? 4, 5, 6 weeks, etc.

Our initial clinic was 6 weeks I believe. But anything between 4-6 is fine. I would do 8 weeks if I knew there was a definitive plan or progression.

4) What would be an ideal and what would be an acceptable price point for you for a month long program? $20-25, $30-35, $40-45, $50, etc.

The beginner's clinic was $65 total and we got a t-shirt. The stroke clinic, I think was $50-$60.

Thank you for your time,

-SF

zapvor
11-16-2009, 05:18 AM
cindy has great input! i would definitely focus on teaching the mechanics.

SFrazeur
11-16-2009, 06:46 AM
cindy has great input! i would definitely focus on teaching the mechanics.

In my clinics teach solid technical fundamentals; I'm moreover just looking for marketing angles.

-SF

SFrazeur
11-16-2009, 07:02 AM
The beginner's clinic was $65 total and we got a t-shirt.


Thank you for taking the time to answer. If I could ask you a couple of follow ups. . .

Was this shirt specific to the clinic or the facility?
Did you ware it, or did you think it was a waste?

If you received a nice cotton or blend Tennis shirt that was specific to women would you where it outside of Tennis?

I'm asking because I've thought about having some nice cotton shirts made up to try and increase word of mouth.

-SF

crystal_clear
11-16-2009, 07:16 AM
Although the “instant noodle” advertisement will attract some customers to get short term results, it won't help much to improve your strokes in the long run. I feel that the clinic/group lessons are good for teaching court position/game strategy or jut for social event; for mechanics, you need to take private lessons to work on real stuff.

I have to admit I am a little bit serious about tennis. :)))

SFrazeur
11-16-2009, 07:21 AM
Although the “instant noodle” advertisement will attract some customers to get short term results, it won't help much to improve your strokes in the long run. I feel that the clinic/group lessons are good for teaching court position/game strategy or jut for social event; for mechanics, you need to take private lessons to work on real stuff.

I have to admit I am a little bit serious about tennis. :)))

Unless they are beginners, which is who I'm going after, then I would agree with you.

-SF

Cindysphinx
11-16-2009, 07:29 AM
Regarding T-shirts, I don't think they would be good for marketing.

My team went to Districts this year, and we received T-shirts. I sent an e-mail to the players telling them they can drop by my house to pick up the shirts (or we can figure out when I'll be in their neighborhood). So far, only two women have even responded. T-shirts don't motivate people!

A visor, hat, or hand towel are all preferable to a T-shirt.

Cindysphinx
11-16-2009, 07:31 AM
Regarding stroke clinics . . .

I did a few of these also, and I really liked it! I could actually see improvement in the stroke over the course of the hour.

At this particular club, it was called "Stroke of the Week." There was FH, BH, volleys, and serve/overhead.

SFrazeur
11-16-2009, 07:45 AM
Ladies,

About the "stroke of the week."
Would you take one in a time slot prior to a weekly league?
What price point would be good for an impulse visit to one?

-SF

Cindysphinx
11-16-2009, 08:22 AM
Ladies,

About the "stroke of the week."
Would you take one in a time slot prior to a weekly league?
What price point would be good for an impulse visit to one?

-SF

You mean, I have a league match at 7 so I do a stroke-of-the-week clinic at 6? Actually, I would be interested in that. We don't get any sort of warm-up for league matches, so that would be helpful.

Price point? $20 for one hour with no more than 4 students. (BTW, the clinic I attended used a ball machine, which made it especially valuable because the instructor stood next to us as we hit).

SFrazeur
11-16-2009, 10:17 AM
You mean, I have a league match at 7 so I do a stroke-of-the-week clinic at 6? Actually, I would be interested in that. We don't get any sort of warm-up for league matches, so that would be helpful.

Price point? $20 for one hour with no more than 4 students. (BTW, the clinic I attended used a ball machine, which made it especially valuable because the instructor stood next to us as we hit).

This is something I'm going to try prior to the ladies league as soon as I can. I would have access to the ball machine. It's a doubles league so it would probably be a good idea to have a play of the week as well. I could proabably do as low as $10 per player, per hour with having four. Might have a drop-in price and a lower price for signing up for an entire 4 week cycle.

-SF

catfish
11-16-2009, 03:20 PM
I am not a beginner, but I am a female player who enjoys clinics. I work full time, so evening clinics at 7pm or 8pm work well for the working crowd. That way they can get home from work, feed their kids & family, then go out for some tennis. But most areas have huge numbers of women who play during the daytime. Either they are stay at home Moms, or they have flexible work schedules. It's best to offer some clinic times for both groups.

Most women that I play with like clinics where you hit a lot of balls and get a good workout. So incorporating fitness into the drills is a plus. Not necessarily medicine balls or jump rope, but drills that require lots of running, like "King of the Court". Be sure to keep the clinic groups small enough so that everyone stays busy and is not standing around. Clinics of 4 work best, IMO. I'm not sure what the going rates are in your area, but most people are willing to pay $15-$20 per person for a 4 person clinic in my area.

The best way to market your clinics is to print some flyers and post them at local tennis courts. Also, contact local USTA League Coordinators and ask if they can help spread the word about your clinics. Many USTA league players are interested in clinics. Also, get all of your student's email addresses. Send them your flyers by email and ask them to forward them on to friends who may also be interested. Email is a great way to get the word out.

Keep in mind that clinics work best when the participants are at a comparable level. One way to make that happen is to ask women to put together a group of 4 or 6 players at their own level to participate in a 6 week session. They can rotate 4 of the 6 in each week. If someone needs a sub, they can ask one of the participants not scheduled for that week. It tends to work well from my experience.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Cindysphinx
11-16-2009, 03:51 PM
This is something I'm going to try prior to the ladies league as soon as I can. I would have access to the ball machine. It's a doubles league so it would probably be a good idea to have a play of the week as well. I could proabably do as low as $10 per player, per hour with having four. Might have a drop-in price and a lower price for signing up for an entire 4 week cycle.

-SF

If you could provide me with a pro and a ball machine and three other people, all for just $10/hour, I would sign up tomorrow. Just for reference, the one club I know where I could use the ball machine is something like $43/hour for the court and then $15 for the machine, with no pro. I sure like the prices in your area!

You sound like a conscientious person. I would think you will do very well in your business. Good luck!!

lagniappe12
11-16-2009, 03:53 PM
Thank you for taking the time to answer. If I could ask you a couple of follow ups. . .

Was this shirt specific to the clinic or the facility?
Did you ware it, or did you think it was a waste?

If you received a nice cotton or blend Tennis shirt that was specific to women would you where it outside of Tennis?

I'm asking because I've thought about having some nice cotton shirts made up to try and increase word of mouth.

-SF

The shirt was specific to the facility. I do wear it often but I go through a lot of t-shirts. I've seen some polos that are nice, but you can't go wrong with visors & towels, like Cindy said. Polos might be nice.

lagniappe12
11-16-2009, 04:01 PM
Ladies,

About the "stroke of the week."
Would you take one in a time slot prior to a weekly league?
What price point would be good for an impulse visit to one?

-SF

Possibly, but I typically like to have a day or two between lessons/clinics and matches so that I can squeeze in some court and or ball machine time in between.

I would take a spur of the moment 1-hr clinic for like $20-$25 depending on the set up. If the student to teacher ratio is low, I'll be more inclined to jump in.

crystal_clear
11-16-2009, 07:33 PM
(BTW, the clinic I attended used a ball machine, which made it especially valuable because the instructor stood next to us as we hit).

I like this ideal. I could hardly hear what my coach said when he hit balls with me.

Cindysphinx
11-17-2009, 03:55 AM
The way the pro worked it is he had 4 people, so he had us in rows, two deep. Say it was a clinic on FH. He set the machine to feed one ball to the FH of the player in the deuce, then one FH to the player in the ad. They were supposed to hit 10 shots and then go to the back of the line.

This was good because the level of the other participants didn't matter -- their inability to get the ball over the net didn't affect me and vice versa.

The only thing I thought didn't work well was the session on volleys. He covered way too many things -- FH volley, BH volley, volleys from deep in the court. It wound up being too disjointed, and no one seemed to get the hang of it. It might be better to split volleys into two sessions, one for FH and one for BH.

TheMagicianOfPrecision
11-17-2009, 04:08 AM
Have you any idea how hard it is for a coach to make everyone on a clinic happy? Its as easy as riding a bike to the moon.

Ive had hundreds of clinics for adults 6-7 players/court with 3 different levels of play, theres no easy solution to that.
EDIT: Sorry, im not a female but had to say this

SFrazeur
11-17-2009, 06:21 AM
Have you any idea how hard it is for a coach to make everyone on a clinic happy? Its as easy as riding a bike to the moon.

Ive had hundreds of clinics for adults 6-7 players/court with 3 different levels of play, theres no easy solution to that.
EDIT: Sorry, im not a female but had to say this

Did you read any of the thread? That's not what the discussion is about at all.

-SF

sureshs
11-17-2009, 06:45 AM
For a couple of years, I did 3 and a pro for 90 minutes and found that sufficient.

OK ........ :-)

TheMagicianOfPrecision
11-17-2009, 06:50 AM
Did you read any of the thread? That's not what the discussion is about at all.

-SF

I read some of it, and responded to what she wrote.

sureshs
11-17-2009, 07:14 AM
One thing you should keep in mind regarding teaching women is that they place great trust in the pro and take the instruction literally. I knew a woman who was taking lessons for 3 years and would not slice. She said her pro does not want to teach her the slice yet. Men will try to figure out ways in which the pro is wrong and how they are superior to him already, but women take the pro seriously and compare notes with each other about what they learnt. In that way, they are a captive audience.

Cindysphinx
11-17-2009, 08:01 AM
One thing you should keep in mind regarding teaching women is that they place great trust in the pro and take the instruction literally. I knew a woman who was taking lessons for 3 years and would not slice. She said her pro does not want to teach her the slice yet. Men will try to figure out ways in which the pro is wrong and how they are superior to him already, but women take the pro seriously and compare notes with each other about what they learnt. In that way, they are a captive audience.

You talkin' about me? :)

Yeah, my pro told me not to slice. The reasons given were that my slice totally sucked, he wanted me to focus on the mechanics of topspin first and toggling back and forth would confuse me, and you'll only slice about 10% of the time so it makes sense to get good at the 90% before worrying about the 10%.

Now that my footwork and topspin have improved, he says we can learn slice if I want.

SFrazeur
11-17-2009, 09:22 AM
One thing you should keep in mind regarding teaching women is that they place great trust in the pro and take the instruction literally. I knew a woman who was taking lessons for 3 years and would not slice. She said her pro does not want to teach her the slice yet. Men will try to figure out ways in which the pro is wrong and how they are superior to him already, but women take the pro seriously and compare notes with each other about what they learnt. In that way, they are a captive audience.

Over the past few years I've found this mostly true in my experience.

-SF

Topaz
11-17-2009, 10:24 AM
I love slicing!

SF, like Cindy alluded to, it is kinda hard to look back and see what would have attracted us to tennis as beginners, since we are not beginners anymore (despite what some think on this board).

So, I'll just share how I personally got back into the game. 'Back into the game' should be taken lightly...I played for two years in HS, but we were bad. REALLY BAD. I joined the tennis team 'cause I thought it looked like fun. Easy as that.

When I moved to my current area, I got mailed a flyer that had all the local recreation classes. A beginner's tennis clinic was always listed. I hemmed and hawed, and tried to find someone to take it with me, but no takers...eventually I just went by myself and checked it out.

I had a ton of fun. It was a mixed group of guys and gals, all total beginners. We worked on basic things like 'how to hit a forehand', and would do mostly drills. After the session ended, I signed up for the intermediate session. The pro who ran that asked me to join a clinic at his club. I did, and also started taking lessons with him. About a year later, he gave me the contact info for the local USTA league, and the rest is history!

Why did I continue? Because I was having fun, and the game just appeals to me. I still, to this day, really like drills (and working hard), but the value of playing competitive points and matches is just as important in learning how to play the whole game (as I"m sure you well know).

Now, I suppose I wasn't a total beginner, because I had played in HS, I knew how to keep score and all that jazz, and I still followed the pro game.

As far as attracting clients...would it be possible for you to teach in an area where potential clients might see you working with a group? And perhaps see them having fun, working hard, and want to join in? If the situation were right, that would be a great way to draw in more people...when they see *other* people doing it and think 'hey, I wanna be a part of that'.

SFrazeur
11-18-2009, 09:38 AM
Thank you to all the women for helping me with my questions. I have a couple more for any who have further input.

Media in Instruction:

1a) How would you react to having video analysis of your strokes? Being video taped, shown the pro and cons of your current stroke, what to work on. Students would be given prior warning to being taped and video would only be shown in class.

1b) If so would you like a copy of your strokes and the breakdown and analysis?

2) Would you be interested in seeing video of Pro Women/Demonstration strokes shown and broken down for you?

3) How would you like a copy of a class instruction manual? One complete with stills of a female student preforming model strokes?

-SF

Topaz
11-18-2009, 09:54 AM
Thank you to all the women for helping me with my questions. I have a couple more for any who have further input.

Media in Instruction:

1a) How would you react to having video analysis of your strokes? Being video taped, shown the pro and cons of your current stroke, what to work on. Students would be given prior warning to being taped and video would only be shown in class.

I have had this done in the past...I like it. Sometimes what you *feel* like you are doing is not what you are actually doing. The pro I've worked with while on vacation at the Outer Banks does this regularly, and has it all set up on the court all the time, so at a moment's notice he can record something. He has a playback area right next to the court, too, so it is very efficient and doesn't waste a lot of time.

1b) If so would you like a copy of your strokes and the breakdown and analysis?

2) Would you be interested in seeing video of Pro Women/Demonstration strokes shown and broken down for you?

3) How would you like a copy of a class instruction manual? One complete with stills of a female student preforming model strokes?

-SF

Yes, yes, and yes.

SFrazeur
11-18-2009, 09:59 AM
I have had this done in the past...I like it. Sometimes what you *feel* like you are doing is not what you are actually doing. The pro I've worked with while on vacation at the Outer Banks does this regularly, and has it all set up on the court all the time, so at a moment's notice he can record something. He has a playback area right next to the court, too, so it is very efficient and doesn't waste a lot of time.

Yes, yes, and yes.

It wouldn't be to the extent of "dart-fish" software or anything, but I've got access to a video camera that can record at a high enough frame rate and a laptop.

-SF

Cindysphinx
11-18-2009, 01:51 PM
Hmmm.

In the abstract, I would have been interested in seeing myself on video as a beginner.

I hesitate, though. See, I took a series of private golf lessons a few years back, and I was a total beginner. Toward the end of the series, the instructor suggested we look at my swing on video.

He shot some video, and his software allowed us to view my swing and also to compare it side-by-side to any of the pros.

I learned two things from the video session: (1) I totally suck at golf, and (2) my butt is a lot bigger than Annika Sorenson's butt.

I just didn't know enough to be able to take the image of myself sucking at golf and do anything with it. It just kind of reinforced that I really really suck, when I thought maybe I only sucked. Perhaps the whole thing was premature?

That said, my current pro has used video with me once -- we always want to do it again but never get around to it. The way we did it was in short bursts. The camera was trained on me, and he had me hit forehands for 2 minutes. Then we would walk over to the screen and watch so I could see myself sucking. Over the course of an hour, it really did help me internalize a specific thing he had previously not been able to get me to do: get out of the way of the ball.

I say all of this because I think it would be difficult to use video effectively in a group of people, and I think beginners are so off the mark with their strokes that it might be tough for them to cut through it all and take away something concrete because *everything* will look so bad, you know?

Maybe if the clinic price included X group lessons and 1 private lesson with video?

Cindysphinx
11-18-2009, 01:53 PM
One more thing occurred to me from my clinic days.

At this one clinic I did for a year or so, there were usually four pros. At the end of the spring session, the last session involved the pros playing doubles against each other while all of us ladies nibbled snacks and watched.

I have to say, it was excellent marketing. It was fun to watch them struggle to do what they were trying to teach us. And it made me feel a part of the place and a bit more loyal to these particular pros and their program.

Topaz
11-18-2009, 05:59 PM
The pro I've worked with in the Outer Banks does the video in a group/class setting. For instance, we'll all be working on a shot (say the serve). As we come up to the line to serve, we are on the camera (which he just keeps rolling). After everyone is done, we all went to the viewing area and watched each other...not nearly as painful as you would think it was...he was great at point out good and bad things for everyone. I thought I was going to hate it, but it very eye-opening and useful. We all had good chuckles over our good/bad stuff, as well as our gigantic rear ends! :)

In other instances, we were hitting a certain shot (ie forehand) with the ball machine, and again, the camera was positioned so that it recorded us during our turn to hit.

crystal_clear
11-18-2009, 07:09 PM
The way the pro worked it is he had 4 people, so he had us in rows, two deep. Say it was a clinic on FH. He set the machine to feed one ball to the FH of the player in the deuce, then one FH to the player in the ad. They were supposed to hit 10 shots and then go to the back of the line.

This was good because the level of the other participants didn't matter -- their inability to get the ball over the net didn't affect me and vice versa.



Then...I changed my mind. I like this kind of clinic.

Topaz
11-24-2009, 01:53 PM
We did some recording in my last clinic, and it was *extremely* helpful. Though, the members of this clinic are very invested and serious about improving our games...not sure beginners would benefit as much, but it is good to have it as an option.