PDA

View Full Version : What will you do if...?


topseed
11-17-2009, 06:45 AM
What will you do if your opponent sharks you during a match? Like making noise using his feet during you serve. Making a lot of comments during the match like even if the ball is clearly out, he still insist that the ball went in. His intentions was to shark and psyche you up.

What I did was to praise him after the match and said to him "that inspite that we lost our match, I am still very happy because the mere fact that you are the favorite, you sharked and dig out a lot of bag of tricks to win the game. That for me is respect for my skills." :D

LuckyR
11-17-2009, 07:23 AM
Well, since playing tennis is not my profession, I can play whomever I want, so I don't play dirtbags.

fe6250
11-17-2009, 08:27 AM
I play ADULT USTA recreational tennis. Most of us aren't young guns trying to prove something, but very rarely I have seen this happen even with a bunch of amateur 40 year old men.

I was serving at 9-9 in a third set tie-break when my opponent shuffled his feet intentionally during the toss (he'd been OK up until that point). I simply caught the ball, looked at him and said (sternly with eyes glaring), "Is that the way we are going to play this?". He quickly apologized and we won the next two points. He also bought my partner and I a round of beers afterwards!

I've typically handled things that way when they happen - but they rarely do.

blakesq
11-17-2009, 09:11 AM
did he intentionally squeek his shoes? or was it the movement that caught your eye. If it was simply movement, then you were wrong to say anything. A returner can move at any time (and so can his partner).

I play ADULT USTA recreational tennis. Most of us aren't young guns trying to prove something, but very rarely I have seen this happen even with a bunch of amateur 40 year old men.

I was serving at 9-9 in a third set tie-break when my opponent shuffled his feet intentionally during the toss (he'd been OK up until that point). I simply caught the ball, looked at him and said (sternly with eyes glaring), "Is that the way we are going to play this?". He quickly apologized and we won the next two points. He also bought my partner and I a round of beers afterwards!

I've typically handled things that way when they happen - but they rarely do.

fe6250
11-17-2009, 10:14 AM
did he intentionally squeek his shoes? or was it the movement that caught your eye. If it was simply movement, then you were wrong to say anything. A returner can move at any time (and so can his partner).

Did you read my post? I said he did it intentionally in my post.

That aside, there are plenty of reasons I knew this:

1.) He hadn't done this at any time prior to this point in the match
2.) He moved his feet (on clay so no squeak just loud) intentionally without moving his position on the court or his readiness. It was clearly an attempt to upset the server
3.) He immediately apologized (note what I said to him - I didn't say he couldn't move)
4.) He bought beer afterwards and continued to apologize - he knew what he had done was not right. He didn't claim to be 'just moving'.

This was a seasoned player who knew exactly what he was doing.

blakesq
11-17-2009, 10:37 AM
I read your post. Was it his movement, or a loud squeeking that disturbed you? If the former, you had nothing to complain about.

Did you read my post? I said he did it intentionally in my post.

That aside, there are plenty of reasons I knew this:

1.) He hadn't done this at any time prior to this point in the match
2.) He moved his feet (on clay so no squeak just loud) intentionally without moving his position on the court or his readiness. It was clearly an attempt to upset the server
3.) He immediately apologized (note what I said to him - I didn't say he couldn't move)
4.) He bought beer afterwards and continued to apologize - he knew what he had done was not right. He didn't claim to be 'just moving'.

This was a seasoned player who knew exactly what he was doing.

fe6250
11-17-2009, 10:47 AM
I read your post. Was it his movement, or a loud squeeking that disturbed you? If the former, you had nothing to complain about.

I don't think you read my second post then...

"He moved his feet (on clay so no squeak just loud) intentionally without moving his position on the court "

But in case that wasn't clear enough... IT WAS THE NOISE.

fe6250
11-17-2009, 10:56 AM
One point of clarification that may be useful too is that he was NOT the receiver of the serve - but the up man.

Based on that fact - I don't think your concern matters according to the USTA code (this was a USTA match):

http://www.usta.com/USTA/Global/Improve_Your_Game/Archive/The_Final_Word/Doubles/Player_Movement.aspx

<copied here for convenience....

Player Movement

Saturday, August 29, 2009 10:22 AM ET


Q. In doubles, can the receiver's partner move as the opponent is serving?


Q. According to The Code, Rule 26. Hindrance, Case 5, the server's partner and the receiver's partner may stand anywhere on their side of the net, unless they are creating a hindrance. Does the receiver's partner, standing with one foot inside each service box and one to two feet toward the net from the service line, constitute a hindrance to the server? It has been conceded by the team doing this that it is deliberately done to make the service box appear smaller to the server. In addition, after the server tosses the ball into the air, but before she has struck the ball, the receiver's partner moves from her position to get out of the way of her partner's return.


A. (Answer to both questions above)
Players may not make motions that are meant to intentionally distract the opponent.

The receiver's partner may stand anywhere, even in the service box. Once the receiver's partner takes a position, he/she should remain there until the ball is struck. If the receiver's partner moves away before the ball is struck then it could be deemed that the only reason they initially took such a position was to hinder the server, and that is not allowed.

Waving your racket or stomping your feet is not permitted.


Q. How much movement is allowed by server's partner at the net so he can influence the return of serve? What is he allowed to do? What is he not allowed to do?


A. At no time may a player make any motions/sounds (waving racket, stomping feet, yelling out, making sudden drastic movements) that could hinder the opponents. The server’s partner must no commit any act that could be deemed as a hindrance as defined in the sentence above.

blakesq
11-17-2009, 11:41 AM
OK, fake poaches are now illegal, according to this quoted section.

Of course, we all know fake poaches are perfectly legal. You appear to be quoting someone who is not familiar with the Code. I prefer to follow the USTA Code which states at paragraph 34:

"34. Body movement. A player may feint with the body while the ball is in
play. A player may change position at any time, including while the server is
tossing the ball. Any other movement or any sound that is made solely to distract an opponent, including, but not limited to, waving the arms or racket or stamping the feet, is not allowed."

Note the word "solely".

One point of clarification that may be useful too is that he was NOT the receiver of the serve - but the up man.

Based on that fact - I don't think your concern matters according to the USTA code (this was a USTA match):

http://www.usta.com/USTA/Global/Improve_Your_Game/Archive/The_Final_Word/Doubles/Player_Movement.aspx

<copied here for convenience....

Player Movement

Saturday, August 29, 2009 10:22 AM ET


Q. In doubles, can the receiver's partner move as the opponent is serving?


Q. According to The Code, Rule 26. Hindrance, Case 5, the server's partner and the receiver's partner may stand anywhere on their side of the net, unless they are creating a hindrance. Does the receiver's partner, standing with one foot inside each service box and one to two feet toward the net from the service line, constitute a hindrance to the server? It has been conceded by the team doing this that it is deliberately done to make the service box appear smaller to the server. In addition, after the server tosses the ball into the air, but before she has struck the ball, the receiver's partner moves from her position to get out of the way of her partner's return.


A. (Answer to both questions above)
Players may not make motions that are meant to intentionally distract the opponent.

The receiver's partner may stand anywhere, even in the service box. Once the receiver's partner takes a position, he/she should remain there until the ball is struck. If the receiver's partner moves away before the ball is struck then it could be deemed that the only reason they initially took such a position was to hinder the server, and that is not allowed.

Waving your racket or stomping your feet is not permitted.


Q. How much movement is allowed by server's partner at the net so he can influence the return of serve? What is he allowed to do? What is he not allowed to do?


A. At no time may a player make any motions/sounds (waving racket, stomping feet, yelling out, making sudden drastic movements) that could hinder the opponents. The server’s partner must no commit any act that could be deemed as a hindrance as defined in the sentence above.

topseed
11-17-2009, 02:45 PM
Thanks guys...

Another incident is that when his partner tried to hit the ball... it bounces off the racket then the ball from the racket hit him in the cheek and went over the net to our side. Is this a point against us? We were not able to return the ball when it went over our side.

kylebarendrick
11-17-2009, 02:58 PM
If a ball touches any part of you other than your racquet, then you lose the point. With that in mind, the player that was hit in the cheek lost the point.

fe6250
11-17-2009, 03:48 PM
OK, fake poaches are now illegal, according to this quoted section.

Of course, we all know fake poaches are perfectly legal. You appear to be quoting someone who is not familiar with the Code. I prefer to follow the USTA Code which states at paragraph 34:

"34. Body movement. A player may feint with the body while the ball is in
play. A player may change position at any time, including while the server is
tossing the ball. Any other movement or any sound that is made solely to distract an opponent, including, but not limited to, waving the arms or racket or stamping the feet, is not allowed."

Note the word "solely".

I quoted the USTA site up above - that was a direct response to someone asking how to interpret the code. It was 'solely' in my case.