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mark999
11-17-2009, 10:52 AM
started working out at local gym with a bosu ball to work on flexibility and strength in the knee and ankle areas. doing deep knee bends with both sides of the ball, and upper body twists with slightly bent knees. anybody have experience using the bosu ball and what exercises do you recommend.

maverick66
11-17-2009, 11:38 AM
outside of rehab unstable surfaces are not good.

atatu
11-17-2009, 12:08 PM
I had one last year, and I was doing squats on the flat side (ball down) and push ups the same way...then I left it outside on one of those 115 degree days here in Texas and the ball part popped out of the base, and I could not get it back in. Check on youtube there are lots of good ideas there.

goran_ace
11-17-2009, 12:38 PM
My trainer has me workout on the bosu regularly. You can do anything on the bosu that you do standing up and the instability forces you to activate more core muscles as you maintain balance. So we do things like bicep curls, tri extensions, squats (using dumbells or the bar with no weight), single leg squats, upright row while standing on the ball and also a lot of 'planking' and push-ups on the ball. Make sure to go slow, keep your balance and keep the motion under control, practice good form.

maverick66
11-17-2009, 12:49 PM
You can do anything on the bosu that you do standing up and the instability forces you to activate more core muscles as you maintain balance.

It doesnt. It actually makes your strength gains go down. Instability has been proven to not work when trying to make gains in strength. It only helps with in a rehab aplication. It has no space in a good strength program.

jrod
11-17-2009, 12:57 PM
I use one and find it helps with balance and stability. I do squats, overhead presses with medicine ball while balanced. Core rotation exercises with medicine ball standing on bosu. Also simulated strokes with resistance bands standing on bosu. It's a small part of a balanced program that involves other exercises that are not bosu-centric.

jman
11-17-2009, 01:07 PM
It doesnt. It actually makes your strength gains go down. Instability has been proven to not work when trying to make gains in strength. It only helps with in a rehab aplication. It has no space in a good strength program.

Really? Could you post your source for this?
Just wondering, because I always use Bosu and Swiss ball while exercising. I think it's helped a lot. But if otherwise, I would like to read up on it.

Ano
11-17-2009, 04:02 PM
^^

J Strength Cond Res. 2007 May;21(2):561-7.

The effects of ten weeks of lower-body unstable surface training on markers of athletic performance.

Cressey EM, West CA, Tiberio DP, Kraemer WJ, Maresh CM.

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. ericcressey@hotmail.com

Initially reserved for rehabilitation programs, unstable surface training (UST) has recently grown in popularity in strength and conditioning and general exercise scenarios.

Nonetheless, no studies to date have examined the effects of UST on performance in healthy, trained individuals.

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of lower-body UST on performance in elite athletes.

Nineteen healthy, trained members (ages 18-23 years) of a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate men's soccer team participated.

The experimental (US) group (n = 10) supplemented their normal conditioning program with lower-body exercises on inflatable rubber discs; the control (ST) group (n = 9) performed the same exercises on stable surfaces. Bounce drop jump (BDJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) heights, 40- and 10-yard sprint times, and T-test (agility) times were assessed before and after the intervention.

The ST group improved significantly on predicted power output on both the BDJ (3.2%) and CMJ (2.4%); no significant changes were noted in the US group.

Both groups improved significantly on the 40- (US = -1.8%, ST = -3.9%) and 10-yard sprint times (US = -4.0%, ST = -7.6%).

The ST group improved significantly more than the US group in 40-yard sprint time; a trend toward greater improvement in the ST group was apparent on the 10-yard sprint time. Both groups improved significantly (US = 2.9%, ST = -4.4%) on T-test performance; no statistically significant changes were apparent between the groups.

These results indicate that UST using inflatable rubber discs attenuates performance improvements in healthy, trained athletes. Such implements have proved valuable in rehabilitation, but caution should be exercised when applying UST to athletic performance and general exercise scenarios.

PMID: 17530966 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Ano
11-17-2009, 04:06 PM
http://backtoformfitness.com/too-much-unstable-training/

Islandtennis
11-17-2009, 04:24 PM
Ano,

I always respect your knowledge and articles that you present. The study that you cited did concentrate on sprinting in one direction. I think that it conclusively proves that training on a bosu will not improve in that area. As you well know, tennis uses a lot of stop and go and sometimes off balance shots and recovery. Could unstable training not have some benefit in tennis specific training?

I know that you have not been positive on unstable training, but intuitively it seems that there could be some benefit with tennis agility and balance. Do you know of any studies that address the balance aspect or at least agility that is so important in tennis?

Ano
11-17-2009, 04:58 PM
Ano,

Could unstable training not have some benefit in tennis specific training?

I know that you have not been positive on unstable training, but intuitively it seems that there could be some benefit with tennis agility and balance. Do you know of any studies that address the balance aspect or at least agility that is so important in tennis?

Short answer : no.

Below is what Keith Scott wrote in his blog :

"If you are trying to increase your strength, unstable training not only is a waste of time, but can actually be a detriment to your gains. You cannot possibly get stronger when you are squatting on a Bosu ball. You feet need a solid, stable surface to be able to increase loads progressively that will cause strength increases. Training on an unstable surface will not allow you to do this and will even make your weaker in the long run. Besides lack of strength increases and getting weaker, it also sets you up for injury. I have rehabbed many injuries that were caused by unstable training accidents.

Worse than anything is when I see golfers, or other athletes using unstable training as part of their program. Training like this will program your body and central nervouse system to perform the wrong way. You will actually learn to swing the wrong way, and your performance will go down. It boggles my mind to see “trainers” out there having their athletes swinging a bat or golf club while standing on a foam pad. Unless you are training to play during an earthquake, unstable training has no place in your fitness plan".

Ano
11-17-2009, 05:08 PM
Below is what Charles Poliquin said about unstable training (google his name if you want to know who Charles Poliquin is) :

"The problem with using Duradisks and similar devices is that you have to use loads that are so insignificant that none of the prime movers really get activated.

I call it "entertainment training," not strength training. And any time I see that horse*****, I want to kick the personal trainer in the head with a pair of steal-toe construction boots.

And the BOSU ball? The BOSU ball is a Swiss ball for morons! Again, when you stand on it you're always bowlegged. Why do you want to get into a position that's not good for your knees and ankles? What about doing it on one foot? So what, then you have to reduce the load!

One of the dumbest things I see is the lying dumbbell press on a Swiss Ball using only one arm. The most a 180 pound guy will be able to use is about 45 pounds. Why?

Because if you use more, you're going to flip over. Now, the same guy can use much more than 45 pounds to do regular flat dumbbell presses. So what's the point?
"Oh, it activates the core." Yeah, and to what degree? All you're doing is firing some stabilizers just to control yourself so you don't flip over, but you're not overloading the pressing muscles. So again, this is just entertainment training. It's circus training and it doesn't do anything!

Now, these devices do work well... in marketing terms.

What we know from an industry standpoint is that all those centers that rely on gimmicks and games, especially the ones geared for teenagers, need to have 76 new clients a month to stay afloat. Why? Because client turnover is very high. The kid goes there and does all this circus training, but he doesn't get faster on the field and he doesn't get stronger. He goes to camp and gets tested on the bench and power clean and comes off like an eleven year old stamp collector and gets cut from the team.


There is such a thing as overcoming inertia. Whenever you sprint, jump, or throw, you're always overcoming inertia. What makes you overcome inertia? Getting stronger.

Entertainment training gets you better at the skill, but it doesn't make you stronger and it doesn't transfer to the field. It's a way to make money as a personal trainer, but it's not a way to make money as a strength coach because your athletes won't get any real results."

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/question_of_strength_34&cr=

maverick66
11-17-2009, 05:14 PM
Ty Ano. I am to lazy to go off citing sources like you have done here. I try to get my point across as simple as possible but its really nice when you can back it up with the information you present. So again ty.

Ano
11-17-2009, 05:44 PM
^^ You are welcome.

mark999
11-17-2009, 05:47 PM
thanks for all replies. i should have made clear i am not using the bosu ball for strength training. i recently read an interesting book called PROBODX by marv marinovich and dr. edythe heus. in the book they describe how by using unstable surfaces to train was more effective than traditional training on stable surfaces. another point in the book was how many great young athletes were ruined by traditional strength training.

maverick66
11-17-2009, 05:53 PM
in the book they describe how by using unstable surfaces to train was more effective than traditional training on stable surfaces. another point in the book was how many great young athletes were ruined by traditional strength training.

The studies and evidence says other wise. When he says traditional training its to broad a description. That could be almost anything.

Ano
11-17-2009, 06:00 PM
Mark, if you want to know the truth about unstable surface training, I highly recommend you take a look at this link:

http://ericcressey.com/unstablesurfacetraininghtml

mark999
11-17-2009, 06:42 PM
the PROBODX exercises are not traditional exercises done on unstable surfaces. they are unique. the small exercise weights used in the program are unstable themselves (sand or water filled). they also use discs, pipes and slant boards (for your feet). just a note on marv marinovich, he was the lead trainer and conditioning coach for the oakland raiders football team, in charge of player development. this was during the time when the raiders were the most dominate team in football. very interesting book to read.

jman
11-17-2009, 08:15 PM
Thanks very much Ano.
Quite informative. If I had known this, I wouldn't have bothered training on bosu.
Just one question, is there any purpose for a bosu or swiss, apart from rehabilitation?
What about abs and back, are bosu and swiss ball still good for these exercises?

Also, off the subject, what are your thoughts on 'Power Plates'?
My gym recently got them in, and it looks quite benificial for my program.

TennisCoachFLA
11-17-2009, 08:33 PM
The posters are correct, unstable surface training is not worth it. Yes, you need to train your core for tennis. But traditional core training and rotational training methods are just fine. Medicine balls are great tools.

Now if you want to work a wobble board for balance training, fine. But performing weighted exercises on them or bosus is not worth the trouble.

Power Plates use vibrations to create instability and force the stabilizer muscles to work. Again, not worth the trouble.

Stronger legs accelerate faster and are more explosive. A strong core transfers the power from the legs to the arm/racquet. Traditional strength training, core training, flexibility training, and plyometrics is all you need.

maverick66
11-17-2009, 08:50 PM
What about abs and back, are bosu and swiss ball still good for these exercises?

I like the range of motion they can give you on ab exercises. They are good for that in my opinion. Thats there only practical purpose. When you do crunches on them and get that good stretch in abs I think its much better than on the floor.

Also, off the subject, what are your thoughts on 'Power Plates'?


Another gimmick.

jman
11-17-2009, 08:54 PM
^^ TennisCoachFLA or maverick66^^

Thanks for the quick response. Are you saying power plates are just another form of UST? If so, should it be incorporated into a fitness plan?
I'm really looking at the power plates for flexibility and massage. I've heard great things about the benifits it can give in both flexibility and muscle relaxation. Any thoughts about this?

Ano
11-17-2009, 09:09 PM
Thanks very much Ano.
Quite informative. If I had known this, I wouldn't have bothered training on bosu.
Just one question, is there any purpose for a bosu or swiss, apart from rehabilitation?
What about abs and back, are bosu and swiss ball still good for these exercises?

Also, off the subject, what are your thoughts on 'Power Plates'?
My gym recently got them in, and it looks quite benificial for my program.

Some good stability (Swiss) ball exercises:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLS8BqdrQj8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pa82yYBgj0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Amf9aHQ6Loo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BIQb3rueWg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFVn0Rh-WWk&feature=related

Please keep in mind, the problem with Swiss ball is that people started doing things with them that their bodies weren't designed to do! For example, squatting on the Swiss ball is completely moronic.

jman
11-17-2009, 09:39 PM
^^Ano^^

Thanks for those links, I do most of those exercises on the swiss. Whew, so not all is lost. What are your thoughts on the Power Plates??

maverick66
11-17-2009, 09:43 PM
Thanks for the quick response. Are you saying power plates are just another form of UST? If so, should it be incorporated into a fitness plan?
I'm really looking at the power plates for flexibility and massage. I've heard great things about the benifits it can give in both flexibility and muscle relaxation. Any thoughts about this?

I dont understand how you gain flexibility by vibrating. If you shake how are the muscles gaining flexibility? I don't really think you have the right term or who ever told you that is really trying to sell you on it.

As for the massage aspect are you gonna sit on it? My impression is these things were used as a platform to do squats or push ups on. With the gimmick being its harder when it shakes. I dont really see how this thing will relieve muscle tightness.

The problem with gimmicks in this industry is someone has invested a good amount of money and time into their product. Even if it is a piece of junk they wanna push this product so they will promise you just about anything and will claim it does more than it can. I have found that sticking to the basic solid lifts have done more than any little functional training book or gimmick device can.

jman
11-17-2009, 09:46 PM
I dont understand how you gain flexibility by vibrating. If you shake how are the muscles gaining flexibility? I don't really think you have the right term or who ever told you that is really trying to sell you on it.

As for the massage aspect are you gonna sit on it? My impression is these things were used as a platform to do squats or push ups on. With the gimmick being its harder when it shakes. I dont really see how this thing will relieve muscle tightness.

The problem with gimmicks in this industry is someone has invested a good amount of money and time into their product. Even if it is a piece of junk they wanna push this product so they will promise you just about anything and will claim it does more than it can. I have found that sticking to the basic solid lifts have done more than any little functional training book or gimmick device can.

Thanks for the input.
I was so close to buying one. Might just give it a try to see what the hype is all about. Thanks for the info, you've saved me thousands of dollars! Although this is one very expensive gimmick!

Ano
11-17-2009, 10:32 PM
^^Ano^^

Thanks for those links, I do most of those exercises on the swiss. Whew, so not all is lost. What are your thoughts on the Power Plates??

Thanks for the input.
I was so close to buying one. Might just give it a try to see what the hype is all about. Thanks for the info, you've saved me thousands of dollars! Although this is one very expensive gimmick!

Save your money.

http://www.realtechnews.com/posts/3286

http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/weight-loss/expert-advice/diet-detective/fit-flops-power-plate-work/?page=2

mark999
11-18-2009, 10:11 AM
Some good stability (Swiss) ball exercises:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLS8BqdrQj8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pa82yYBgj0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Amf9aHQ6Loo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BIQb3rueWg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFVn0Rh-WWk&feature=related

Please keep in mind, the problem with Swiss ball is that people started doing things with them that their bodies weren't designed to do! For example, squatting on the Swiss ball is completely moronic.

those youtube videos are some of the same exercises in the PROBODX book.

Topaz
11-18-2009, 10:41 AM
Mark, if you want to know the truth about unstable surface training, I highly recommend you take a look at this link:

http://ericcressey.com/unstablesurfacetraininghtml

Ha, I can't see the phrase 'Bosu Ball' and not think of Cressey and Gentilcore!

jrod
11-18-2009, 11:16 AM
Really interesting discussion folks.

I feel that I should qualify my earlier statement then and point out that I have chronic patella tendonitis. I'm not entirely clear whether my use of a bosu constitutes rehab, but my trainer integrates 1-2 exercises involving it per 1 hour session (~5 minutes). The rest of the session is on stable surfaces.

maverick66
11-18-2009, 01:17 PM
Thanks for the input.
I was so close to buying one. Might just give it a try to see what the hype is all about. Thanks for the info, you've saved me thousands of dollars! Although this is one very expensive gimmick!

No problem. You just have to do your research when it comes to fitness. There is a good amount of bad information on the web. I have in the past a few times fell for some of it but as I read and learn more I am starting to sort through the bs. Its amazing how many people have discovered a new and amazing way to get fit with 30 mins a day. It sounds good and easy and unfortunately thats what people fall for.

r2473
11-18-2009, 02:18 PM
Its amazing how many people have discovered a new and amazing way to get fit with 30 mins a day.

30 minutes a day!! You're working way too hard man.

Listen, if you send me 2 easy payments of $19.99, I can get you in Ivan Stoitsov* shape in just 7 minutes a week.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VQ1seK9-hsE/SGX9eWFjReI/AAAAAAAACKU/--7UUCNVH0A/s400/ivan+stoitsov.jpg



*This statement is not endorsed by Ivan Stoitsov

Ano
11-18-2009, 05:48 PM
^^Ano^^

Thanks for those links, I do most of those exercises on the swiss. Whew, so not all is lost.

jman, please keep this in mind, Swiss ball, like everything else in the gym, is just a tool. It can be used or abused, depending on whose hands it's in.

The fact that there are people out there abusing a certain tool doesn't mean we should throw it out of the tool box altogether.

Heck, if that were the case, we wouldn't use any equipment at all judging by what I have seen people doing with barbells and dumbbells! :)

jman
11-18-2009, 06:15 PM
Thanks everyone especially Ano and maverick66.
I tried the power plate this morning, and to my surprise I actually worked up quite a sweat, with the supervision of a instructor. I feel it could be used great as a pre stretch or post stretch prior or after a workout. Feels nice also as in massage mode.
Definitely stick with solid stable workouts from now on, but may integrate this machine with stretches and muscle relaxation.

topher.juan
11-18-2009, 06:16 PM
While the physical benefits of exercising on an unstable surface can be debated, I've conclusively found that girls at the gym will open conversation with you many more times if you do pistols on a Bosu (flat side up) apposed to doing pistols on the floor or bench. Take that into consideration.

mark999
11-19-2009, 06:28 AM
While the physical benefits of exercising on an unstable surface can be debated, I've conclusively found that girls at the gym will open conversation with you many more times if you do pistols on a Bosu (flat side up) apposed to doing pistols on the floor or bench. Take that into consideration.

finally, some serious advice!

acer4tennis
11-19-2009, 06:29 AM
I think you should combine a training on Bosu and other unstable surfaces with functional movements specifically for tennis.

atatu
11-19-2009, 07:51 AM
Like just about anything else related to fitness, there are lots of experts on both sides of the coin who can point to different studies to support their positions. The guys who walk into the gym and yell "GO HEAVY OR GO HOME !" like to discredit functional training concepts. However, there are many individuals such as Mark Verstegan, Pat Etcheberry, and Mike Boyle who use functional training and prepare professional atheletes for competition.

jrod
11-19-2009, 08:15 AM
While the physical benefits of exercising on an unstable surface can be debated, I've conclusively found that girls at the gym will open conversation with you many more times if you do pistols on a Bosu (flat side up) apposed to doing pistols on the floor or bench. Take that into consideration.


So, to summarize, the only time one should consider using a bosu ball in training is during rehab with lots of interesting women hanging around...at $70/hour these training sessions are gonna be real bargain.

maverick66
11-19-2009, 11:35 AM
Mike Boyle

I got a video link from him saying never squat again. Me and Mike Boyle are done. I love the squat and feel it is one of the greatest exercises ever designed. So I am not a big fan of his right now.

r2473
11-19-2009, 12:07 PM
Like just about anything else related to fitness, there are lots of experts on both sides of the coin who can point to different studies to support their positions. The guys who walk into the gym and yell "GO HEAVY OR GO HOME !" like to discredit functional training concepts. However, there are many individuals such as Mark Verstegan, Pat Etcheberry, and Mike Boyle who use functional training and prepare professional atheletes for competition.

The effectiveness of any training program / philosophy / equipment can only be examined with respect to:

1) What goals they aim to achieve (strength, size, flexibility, speed, etc)

2) How efficiently and effectively they achieve the stated goals.


These are relative concepts. Meaning, how well does one program achieve goal X relative to an alternative program.

How does one "know" one program is better than another? I would be forced to respond to this by saying that epistemology is a rather complicated subject (in other words (2) is open to many different opinions. Most people will believe what they want to believe).

If you believe the Bosu ball is helping you achieve your stated goals in the most efficient manner, then use it.

Topaz
11-19-2009, 02:20 PM
I got a video link from him saying never squat again. Me and Mike Boyle are done. I love the squat and feel it is one of the greatest exercises ever designed. So I am not a big fan of his right now.

Ha! I got it, too, and though WTF? Didn't have time to read the whole thing, though...I'm subscribed to too many things to keep up with it all.

Ano
11-19-2009, 04:13 PM
I got a video link from him saying never squat again. Me and Mike Boyle are done. I love the squat and feel it is one of the greatest exercises ever designed. So I am not a big fan of his right now.

Did he say: "never squat again" or did he say: "never back squat again" ?

He still recommends his athletes to do front squat.

Click the link below and go to page 2.

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/lifts_i_never_did_used_to_do_or_just_started_doing _again&cr=

maverick66
11-19-2009, 05:53 PM
Ha! I got it, too, and though WTF? Didn't have time to read the whole thing, though...I'm subscribed to too many things to keep up with it all.

Me to. My email is all things from fitness sites and online shops. Its at least 6-10 every morning. And oddly enough most of it is someone tryingto get me to buy someones book or dvd. Every once in a while they give you something good though.

Did he say: "never squat again" or did he say: "never back squat again" ?

I think the back squat. He didnt like the pressure it put on the lower back I believe. I disagree with him on it. If the form is good the athlete shouldnt hurt there lower back so I kinda had a reaction like topaz of wtf.

Ano
11-19-2009, 06:27 PM
I think the back squat. He didnt like the pressure it put on the lower back I believe. I disagree with him on it. If the form is good the athlete shouldnt hurt there lower back so I kinda had a reaction like topaz of wtf.

I understand Boyle's point of view.

Below is exactly what he wrote :

"As a former powerlifter, it was tough for me to give up on traditional back squats. But as a strength and conditioning coach, it was one of the best things I've ever done.

Back pain nearly disappeared among our athletes when we switched to front squats. Along with back pain went hours of me screaming "head up, chest up!" as some of my athletes struggled with technique.

I don't even have to click through to the discussion thread to know that someone's going to tell me the back squat wouldn't be a problem for my athletes if I coached it properly. I don't disagree. But, again, I ask you to see it from my point of view. If I'm coaching 20 or 30 athletes at a time, I can't be focused on the technical nuances of the lift.

The front squat is much harder to do wrong than the back squat, which is why I use it instead of the more popular version of the exercise".

As far as I know, Boyle doesn't discourage the general fitness enthusiast to back squat. He doesn't allow the back squat for his athletes only.

spacediver
11-20-2009, 09:47 AM
Nice post r2473.


I use a wobble board regularly at the gym. I've progressed to the point where I can do one legged body weight squats for 3 reps before I lose strength/focus.

I agree that as a strength and mass building program they are no substitute for real barbell squats or lunges, on a solid surface, but perhaps there are benefits to be found if the goal is not simply strength.

I do them because they're a fun skill to develop and seem to train the mind and body in a certain way.

I'd like to believe that the skills developed can transfer into sporting applications and I really hope they don't have a detrimental effect.


Granted, in a tennis game one is never going to have to balance on one foot on a wobble board.

However, I sense that the kinesthetic awareness that is developed through such training may render neuromuscular firing patterns more efficient in other contexts.

Or perhaps the stabilizing muscle groups involved in balancing on a wobble board (one footed) can effectively strengthen the ability of the ankle to generate healthy and powerful forces against the ground when changing direction.

Of course, this is all theoretical speculation, but the 2007 study on instability training doesn't seem to reveal much about the many potential dimensions of athletic performance that can be influenced by stability training. I'll have to read that study in detail though.

r2473
11-20-2009, 10:34 AM
I think the back squat. He didnt like the pressure it put on the lower back I believe. I disagree with him on it. If the form is good the athlete shouldnt hurt there lower back so I kinda had a reaction like topaz of wtf.

The lower back is almost certain to be the weak point in the back squat. It certainly is for me. I have never injured my lower back, but it certainly "fails" before my legs do.

But, I don't think this should be a reason to stop doing back squats.

Spacediver, I love doing pistols. I have worked up to 2 sets of 10 with each leg. (Won't be trying them on a wobble board however......unless there are girls watching as someone said in an earlier post :)).

spacediver
11-20-2009, 10:58 AM
ah, the version I do is opposite to the pistol squat. The non squatting leg goes behind me, and my range of motion isn't nearly as full as a full pistol squat.

I didn't know those were called pistol squats, but I was intending to learn them in the near future (first on solid ground then on wobble board).

r2473
11-20-2009, 11:14 AM
^^It took me a year to work up to that level. For the first X months, I had to hold on to the side of the squat rack for support and assistance.

maverick66
11-20-2009, 11:16 AM
I don't even have to click through to the discussion thread to know that someone's going to tell me the back squat wouldn't be a problem for my athletes if I coached it properly. I don't disagree. But, again, I ask you to see it from my point of view. If I'm coaching 20 or 30 athletes at a time, I can't be focused on the technical nuances of the lift.


didnt read the article. I just got sent the video. He admitted in the video that he was gonna ripped on but I don't remember him talking about that he liked the move just couldn't be bothered to teach it. I still disagree with him in scraping the move all together. Its one the best strength building moves out there.