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View Full Version : How to Flatten out My 2Handed backhand


Roy125
11-21-2009, 03:53 PM
Ever since I've had my 2Handed backhand, it has always been the stroke that I have least control over. I always produce a shot that has a lot of top spin and goes near the baseline. I want to know how to make my backhand more flat for those passing shots.

Oh and can someone explain the advantages/disadvantages of the neutral stance over the other stances? I use an eastern and conti. grip for my 2 Handed backhand by the way.

chris
11-21-2009, 04:29 PM
hit it close stanced and make sure your low so you can drive straight through the ball and extend like your hitting five balls through

Roy125
11-21-2009, 04:30 PM
hit it close stanced and make sure your low so you can drive straight through the ball and extend like your hitting five balls through

But why the closed stance though? I don't fully understand the whole differences between the stances.

papa
11-21-2009, 05:12 PM
If you have the time, you can hit a flatter ball with more pace from a closed position. But, all too often, we don't have that luxury and have to hit with a more open stance - like on the return of service.
So the bottom line is, flatten out the swing path and you'll increase your pace - can you hit a flat shot using an open stance, of course but its easier from a closed position.

What happens many times is that players try to hit the 2HBH with and "in between" type stance where they plant the left foot and the right foot doesn't cross over but gets elevated off the court - its kinda like hitting a slap shot off of the inside leg, it won't work. Regardless of the stance, the right foot has to get planted.

Roy125
11-21-2009, 05:17 PM
Thanks for the much needed advice, papa.

35ft6
11-21-2009, 05:47 PM
Imagine you're throwing a frisbee, swing your racket using that trajectory.

Bottle Rocket
11-21-2009, 05:56 PM
But why the closed stance though? I don't fully understand the whole differences between the stances.

Closed stance means you're using linear momentum to impart force on the ball as you literally step into the ball. Open stance uses rotational momentem as your upper body rotates. I think that in general, open stance strokes are more suited towards heavier topsin, while closed stance shots produce more "classic" shots which are generally flatter, though I'm talking extremes here. Of course, you can produce either shot with either stance. I also think open stance strokes are more difficult to learn and may slow one's progression at the game as you never quite learn weight transfer and in-turn might lose something in your footwork developemtn.

I am not a coach, not a teaching pro, or anywhere close to being one, but I'm a big tennis fan, a self-taught player, and someone who studies biomechanics. In my opinion, if you have the time to hit a closed stance backhand, I think you should. I think that eventually, as you improve as a player, hitting open stance shots is generally a "natural" progression.

Some searching on this forum, if you're actually wondering what the physical difference is, should bring up all kinds of good stuff. Bungalo Bill, tricky, and others have made some fantastic posts.

Ever since I've had my 2Handed backhand, it has always been the stroke that I have least control over. I always produce a shot that has a lot of top spin and goes near the baseline. I want to know how to make my backhand more flat for those passing shots.

Oh and can someone explain the advantages/disadvantages of the neutral stance over the other stances? I use an eastern and conti. grip for my 2 Handed backhand by the way.

If you "always produce a shot that has a lot of top spin and goes near the baseline", then you've got a shot that you shoudln't mess with. If you can do this consistently, you're hated by the majority of the tennis playing population.

However, since you do this with an eastern and continental grip, sounds like this may be more of a moonball, without much topspin, and lacking in pace? Which brings me to my final thought - post a video! You can get some advice from guys on this forum that is literally worth $100's of dollar if you post a video. In your case, this may be the best way for improvement.

Roy125
11-21-2009, 06:34 PM
Bottle, I think that you are right on point on the moonball thing.:(

I'd like to upload a video, but I have no resources for it.

Frank Silbermann
11-22-2009, 07:56 AM
You could be different and try flattening it in.

Noaler
11-22-2009, 08:19 AM
flattening the ball should give you less accuracy.

papa
11-22-2009, 09:00 AM
Maybe a little confusion here. A passing shot, generally anyway is not hit with a great deal of depth. Those that are generally will go long because among other things the distance is shorter.

A passing shot, is (generally) hit to the side - and not necessarily the larger side either. Its generally more of a factor when the opposing player has closed on net, to some degree, and has less time to react.

LeeD
11-22-2009, 09:50 AM
Passing shots don't need to be hit with more forceful or faster swings. They can just be taken early, hit flatter and faster, or placed better. Or any of the above 3 combinations.
Flatter is usually less consistent, which is why we hit with spin. But flatter with correct SIDESPIN, ala JimmyConnors, can be very accurate and replicable.
Closed stance with conti/eastern grips give a longer strike zone, giving more accuracy.
If you chose a W or SW 2hbh, then a more open stance might actually work better and easier.

papa
11-22-2009, 04:12 PM
Passing shots don't need to be hit with more forceful or faster swings. They can just be taken early, hit flatter and faster, or placed better. Or any of the above 3 combinations.
Flatter is usually less consistent, which is why we hit with spin. But flatter with correct SIDESPIN, ala JimmyConnors, can be very accurate and replicable.
Closed stance with conti/eastern grips give a longer strike zone, giving more accuracy.
If you chose a W or SW 2hbh, then a more open stance might actually work better and easier.

I don't have any problems with this.

LeeD
11-22-2009, 04:21 PM
I do....
I can sometimes give pretty good advice and insight, but I'm guilty of all the wrongdoings a tennis player can possibly adopt when I play against an equal or superior player.
I can pound first serves into the netcord consistently. I can crush forehands 3' out even thos they clear the net by two feet. I can double fault break points, and slap a backhand wide when a consistent low return is called for....:shock::shock:
Advice is one thing.... being able to play smart tennis is altogether something else.
Nice after couple years of 4.0 to 4.5 tennis, my game has actually gotten significantly better now that I'm not obsessed with getting a girlfriend...:shock: :)

Roy125
11-22-2009, 05:10 PM
Nice after couple years of 4.0 to 4.5 tennis, my game has actually gotten significantly better now that I'm not obsessed with getting a girlfriend...:shock: :)

Maybe that's my problem too!:shock:

ubermeyer
11-22-2009, 05:38 PM
Focus on hitting totally flat - don't think about hitting ANY spin at all. That's what I do, and I still get enough spin to keep it very consistent, but mainly more power.

This may sound like useless advice, but try it, it really works!

Roy125
11-22-2009, 09:49 PM
Focus on hitting totally flat - don't think about hitting ANY spin at all. That's what I do, and I still get enough spin to keep it very consistent, but mainly more power.

This may sound like useless advice, but try it, it really works!

Putting spin on my backhand automatically is a habit i need to break really badly. I'll try timing my strokes better and hitting the ball flat out.

TennisTurkey
11-23-2009, 01:34 AM
I know you are asking to hit flatter but it sounds like you are looking for more pace.

It would be great to be able to hit dipping passing shots with your current amount of spin but more pace.

Try consciously turning your shoulders more on your backswing (maybe try pulling your racket further back with your non-dominant hand) and then just try to time the ball sweetly without muscling it.

papa
11-23-2009, 03:53 AM
I do....
I can sometimes give pretty good advice and insight, but I'm guilty of all the wrongdoings a tennis player can possibly adopt when I play against an equal or superior player.
I can pound first serves into the netcord consistently. I can crush forehands 3' out even thos they clear the net by two feet. I can double fault break points, and slap a backhand wide when a consistent low return is called for....:shock::shock:
Advice is one thing.... being able to play smart tennis is altogether something else.
Nice after couple years of 4.0 to 4.5 tennis, my game has actually gotten significantly better now that I'm not obsessed with getting a girlfriend...:shock: :)

Well, I can't help you much with the girlfriend thing - I happened to get lucky a long time ago.

If you can keep up with the 4.0 - 4.5 group, I wouldn't be doing too much complaining. That's pretty much the top of the pile at most, if not all, clubs. Unless your committed to doing a lot of traveling, or can get back in college, I'm afraid to tell you, its not going to get a heck of a lot better.

Hey, making mistakes/reducing errors is the name of the game. Take a deep breath, relax, smile and move on to the next point.

crash1929
11-23-2009, 06:09 AM
I first get my low to high going, exaggerate it and when i start hitting that well and get in a groove, i slwoly start leveling my swing path.

Roy125
11-23-2009, 09:53 AM
i just first get my high to low going, exaggerate it and when i start hitting that well and get in a groove, i slwoly start leveling my swing path.

High to low? High as in the backswing and low as in the contact spot?

crash1929
11-23-2009, 10:45 AM
Sorry no I meant to write low to high stroke going. Its much easier to brush the ball back with a two hander this way. Just start looping em over. The flat bh is harder- but if you get the low to high topsin brush going well you will be able to start flattening it eventually. Again exaggerate the low to high when getting warmed up. Then just start leveling the swing path. Now that I think about it this is how nadals bh evolved overtime.

LeeD
11-23-2009, 11:29 AM
Crissy and Tracy had somewhat flat backhands.
Were two of the most consistent 2HBH's ever in the game.
They learned not to get excited and overswing. You can too, if you take enough drugs.. :oops:

Roy125
11-23-2009, 12:21 PM
I get excited too many times when I play tennis. That's why my coach always says to calm down 10 times each session.:shock: The power of youth rocks.

LeeD
11-23-2009, 12:33 PM
Not youth, but rather INEXPERIENCE !
Some great junior players with steady minds, calm and casual, due to tennis experience.
That's what all this topspin current craze is all about! You get excited, you get a burst of energy/adrenaline, you hit MORE TOPSPIN to keep it inside the baseline.
Now when you calm down, you look to see where your balls are landing. Short, hit higher. Long, more topspin.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-23-2009, 12:38 PM
Ever since I've had my 2Handed backhand, it has always been the stroke that I have least control over. I always produce a shot that has a lot of top spin and goes near the baseline. I want to know how to make my backhand more flat for those passing shots.

Oh and can someone explain the advantages/disadvantages of the neutral stance over the other stances? I use an eastern and conti. grip for my 2 Handed backhand by the way.

Video would help a lot, because I severely question your ability to put heavy topspin on the ball if you're having so many stroke problems and are using a very conservative grip on the backhand side. My guess is that you're using the conventional low to high motion, but open up the racket face and hit a flat lob. Such a shot has very little spin. Though heavy spin is quite relative, so your idea of heavy spin will be very different from mine.

There are a few things I think you should look at in your stroke:
1) At contact, is your racket face perfectly (or very close to) perpendicular to the court?
2) If not, fix it and make sure your racket face is perpendicular to the court. As you get better, it will end up slightly closed. If it is perpendicular to the court already, then guide your racket straight through contact and towards your intended target area. As you get better, swing faster through the contact zone. You want to minimize the lift (or brush/spinning) action you get with your stroke at contact.
3) Add lift as necessary to get the ball over the net.
4) Add spin as necessary to keep the ball inside the lines or to control the depth.

The most important part of any stroke is what happens at contact. The way you set up merely allows you added racket head speed, and the follow through makes it easier on your body to avoid injury. Good footwork pretty much allows for consistent contact and consistent swinging (since we take rather large swings at the ball, where there is plenty of places where error can occur).

Roy125
11-23-2009, 06:06 PM
OH MY GOD! I think that I found out the problem with my backhand. It feels restricted when I do my 2H backhand. It's like my 2 hands are out of sync and my control for the stroke goes awry. I have no idea how but even when I drop the ball and hit it with my backhand, it's difficult for it to hit outside the service line.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-23-2009, 06:37 PM
OH MY GOD! I think that I found out the problem with my backhand. It feels restricted when I do my 2H backhand. It's like my 2 hands are out of sync and my control for the stroke goes awry. I have no idea how but even when I drop the ball and hit it with my backhand, it's difficult for it to hit outside the service line.

If that was the real problem, I think you would've naturally moved on to a one handed backhand a LONG time ago... :shock:

Roy125
11-23-2009, 07:04 PM
If that was the real problem, I think you would've naturally moved on to a one handed backhand a LONG time ago... :shock:

It's that surprising.