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Oldracquet27
11-24-2009, 11:49 AM
you called a ball out that she thinks was in. It happened to me the other night , i called a ball probably 4 inches out of the side line. She said " are you sure that ball did not hit the line"? with an attitude. What do you do not to feel bothered fot that insult!, I am very careful calling my lines , i normally call in any shot that gets close to the line unless i am very very positive it was out. But i guess there will always be this type of player who complaints. I was totally dominating that match by the way.

I am just upset about she thinking or telling others i might cheated!!!!! How do you handle that?

kylebarendrick
11-24-2009, 12:00 PM
"Yes I'm sure"

or, if I'm really not that sure...

"you know, I'm not as sure as I thought at first - your point"

LuckyR
11-24-2009, 12:27 PM
you called a ball out that she thinks was in. It happened to me the other night , i called a ball probably 4 inches out of the side line. She said " are you sure that ball did not hit the line"? with an attitude. What do you do not to feel bothered fot that insult!, I am very careful calling my lines , i normally call in any shot that gets close to the line unless i am very very positive it was out. But i guess there will always be this type of player who complaints. I was totally dominating that match by the way.

I am just upset about she thinking or telling others i might cheated!!!!! How do you handle that?

Wow, that is unfortunate. I never have to deal with this problem (well, almost never...). I call the lines pretty generously so my word is taken very much as accurate. For example, if a ball is traveling through the air and looks like it will land out, but I don't actually see it land out, I will play the ball. If the majority of the ball is clearly out, but I can't see any "daylight" between the line and ball, I will play the ball, etc.

In actual answer to your question, if it is with a friend I would say let's play two in a tone that says: "I enjoy playing tennis with you enough, where I don't care where that ball landed". if it is matchplay, then I would say "I saw the ball land out".

SlapChop
11-24-2009, 12:49 PM
I have been asked are you sure a couple times. I always reply yes because I never call a ball out if I am not sure.

Geezer Guy
11-24-2009, 12:53 PM
I call the lines pretty generously - or so I'm told. However, there are times when the other person has a better view. On a sideline call, for instance, if they're looking right down the line I will accept their "In" call even if from my view it definately looked out.

On the other hand, if I'm looking down the line and clearly see the ball out, and they're standing across the way and ask if it was in I just say I'm positive it was out and I won't change my call.

The important thing is to get the call right, and not worry so much about who it benefits.

Daveyo
11-24-2009, 06:35 PM
You or your opponent is not going to get every call correct, its just not going to happen. Play with honesty and integrity and at the end of the day no matter what you'll sleep just fine. I also call the lines very generous as does most of my opponents, if its really close and we both think were correct we replay the point with a first serve.

USERNAME
11-24-2009, 08:35 PM
"It was out" in a neutral tone with confident posture, I do that mainly in tournys and usually never look at the person when saying it (I wipe my hands or check my strings) usually helps avoid a small explosion.

the little dasher
11-24-2009, 08:47 PM
Put your hands on your hips. Look at the line then back up at her and say; I thought I only had to be fair not charitable.

Knightmace
11-24-2009, 11:54 PM
don't give in

Topaz
11-25-2009, 03:37 AM
Keep it simple...'Yes, I'm sure it was out', and I would do her the courtesy of looking at her while you said it. If you avoid eye contact, then she probably will think you're lying.

I only had an issue with this once...when an opponent thought I played her serve which she thought was out. She was getting all uppity and making gestures to her coach (who was watching through the observation glass) and I said 'Hey! I'm doing the best I can over here, ok?'. Umm, that pretty much shut her up. Bullies aren't used to people standing up to them, but you just need to be direct and polite, but also firm. You don't want anything like that to throw you off your game (especially if you're dominating).

kylebarendrick
11-25-2009, 07:16 AM
As some people have pointed out, it is not possible to always make perfect line calls. Just watch one pro match with line judges all over the place as well as a chair umpire to convince yourself of that. With that in mind, there is no reason to take offense to a polite "are you sure?" from your opponent. Assume that they are asking in good faith and ask yourself if you are really sure. If you are, then say so - politely and while looking at them. If you aren't sure then give them the point. According to the code, you cannot offer to just play the point over - if you are sure of the call then it is your point.

I wouldn't worry about line judges or other stuff unless an ugly pattern develops.

HitItHarder
11-25-2009, 07:22 AM
You don't want anything like that to throw you off your game (especially if you're dominating).

I have only had one real problem with someone challenging me on an out call, and I was caught off guard because the ball was clearly out. My opponent seemed to be making a big deal out of me making a bad call and then intentionally hooked me on the next point by calling a ball a foot inside the line out.

It took me several games to get my head back into the match. Which I ended up barely winning. After the match I told him that the ball really was a foot out, because I was still thinking about it. My opponent told me he figured it was, he was just trying to throw me off a little because I was cruising at that point in the match.

So the whole out call scene was just gamesmanship and it worked. I got completely off my game and let the opponent back in the match.

It taught me two lessons. One -- I don't play this person anymore. Two -- My mental game has to get better. Now, I make my calls. If they question me, I simply say the ball was "clearly out" and move to serve or receive without hesitation. No one gets every call right, just do your best, be fair, and move on.

Topaz
11-25-2009, 07:53 AM
^^^Exactly! It throws me off sometimes, too, and for me...well, game, set, match!

Loco4Tennis
11-25-2009, 08:05 AM
Put your hands on your hips. Look at the line then back up at her and say; I thought I only had to be fair not charitable.

hahaha thats a good one :-)
im sure to use that one at my next match, hope you dont mind :-)

kelawai
11-25-2009, 09:28 AM
I hate when someone own both side of the court. Inexperience player can get easily thrown off their game after a few questioning line call.

I have few experienced that I have no idea how to make a call when it was inches off. The whole game is to pleased the opponent.

retlod
11-25-2009, 11:16 AM
How do you handle that?

I just think to myself, "What would Serena do?"

Ripper014
11-25-2009, 11:35 AM
you called a ball out that she thinks was in. It happened to me the other night , i called a ball probably 4 inches out of the side line. She said " are you sure that ball did not hit the line"? with an attitude. What do you do not to feel bothered fot that insult!, I am very careful calling my lines , i normally call in any shot that gets close to the line unless i am very very positive it was out. But i guess there will always be this type of player who complaints. I was totally dominating that match by the way.

I am just upset about she thinking or telling others i might cheated!!!!! How do you handle that?


Confirm the call... that you clearly saw the ball out, and move on. The call is yours to make... the problem is not yours it is hers. Those that play with you will know you don't cheat... and those that don't know you probably know her... so does it matter?

the little dasher
11-25-2009, 02:33 PM
hahaha thats a good one :-)
im sure to use that one at my next match, hope you dont mind :-)

By all means. My pleasure.

dangros
11-26-2009, 05:36 AM
stop, look at the line, point to the spot with your racket, and scream out "YOU CAN NOT BE SERIOUS!!!!", then take a swipe at your cup of water w/your racket, keep groaning for a bit, then proceed to kick their A.

kennydoe
11-26-2009, 05:39 AM
the occasional bad call is part of the game, and I just basically accept it.

If it's on my side and I'm not 100% sure, it's your point. If it's a regular partner and there's a call on a side line that he/she has a better line of sight, I'll let them make the call.

On the other side of the net, if i think they got it wrong, I'll say "I'll disagree, but i won't argue".

It happens. You get them wrong, others get them wrong - all part of the game. Maybe I'm too trusting.

Geezer Guy
11-26-2009, 06:42 PM
... Now, I make my calls. If they question me, I simply say the ball was "clearly out" and move to serve or receive without hesitation. No one gets every call right, just do your best, be fair, and move on.

I totally agree that no one gets every call right. To simply say the ball was "clearly out" every time does a disservice to both your opponent and yourself. Surely you must admit that you can make a mistake from time to time, and that occasionally your opponent is in a better position to see where a ball landed than you are. Seems to me you should at least consider the possibility that you made a mistake on a call, and override yourself if that may have happened.

jmnk
11-26-2009, 07:12 PM
I totally agree that no one gets every call right. To simply say the ball was "clearly out" every time does a disservice to both your opponent and yourself. Surely you must admit that you can make a mistake from time to time, and that occasionally your opponent is in a better position to see where a ball landed than you are. Seems to me you should at least consider the possibility that you made a mistake on a call, and override yourself if that may have happened.
I must disagree with you. What you are essentially admitting is that you make an out call when you are not 100% sure, and you are willing to change the call when the opponent questions. This seems against the code to me. If you are not 100% sure you are supposed to call it in, or not call at all, ask the opponent and go by his call. If he says he is not sure than it is 'in'.

Ken Honecker
11-27-2009, 01:02 AM
Next time this happens I might try removing my bifocals, putting them on upside down, bending forward to squint at the court and then shout "nope, it's still out".

Geezer Guy
11-27-2009, 10:09 PM
I must disagree with you. What you are essentially admitting is that you make an out call when you are not 100% sure, and you are willing to change the call when the opponent questions. This seems against the code to me. If you are not 100% sure you are supposed to call it in, or not call at all, ask the opponent and go by his call. If he says he is not sure than it is 'in'.

No. I assure you - I don't call a ball out unless I'm sure it's out. Still, there's that rare occasion where I thought a ball was out (or even in, for that matter) and my opponent was just as sure it was in (or out). We're both sure - but one of us HAS to be wrong. I figure whoever has the better line of sight should be the one to make the final call.

And I've been on the other side of that too. I hit a shot right up the line - and I'm standing right on the line and I see it bounce right smack in the middle of the line - and my opponent calls it out.

DownTheLine
11-27-2009, 10:27 PM
I've never gotten why people ask " Are you sure?" Of course there sure!

Fedace
11-27-2009, 10:30 PM
"I will take your wife and do the world tour"... LOL

Cody
11-28-2009, 01:13 AM
Sprinkle the ball in UV powder that shows up under indoor lights.

It could be interesting to see were you are hitting the ball and the service box littered in marks.

kylebarendrick
11-28-2009, 09:56 AM
They ask "are you sure?" because the believe they saw it land in. They may even have had a better angle than you. I know that nobody here ever makes a bad call, so I can understand why this sounds so foreign.

Cindysphinx
11-28-2009, 03:45 PM
They ask "are you sure?" because the believe they saw it land in. They may even have had a better angle than you. I know that nobody here ever makes a bad call, so I can understand why this sounds so foreign.

When I ask "Are you sure?" what I really mean is, "That ball was totally in, and I saw you hook me just now. Please don't think I didn't catch that. Watch yourself, 'cause next time we're going to have a discussion about it."

I use The Magic Words because they are the ones suggested by the Code.

jmnk
11-30-2009, 08:38 PM
No. I assure you - I don't call a ball out unless I'm sure it's out. Still, there's that rare occasion where I thought a ball was out (or even in, for that matter) and my opponent was just as sure it was in (or out). We're both sure - but one of us HAS to be wrong. I figure whoever has the better line of sight should be the one to make the final call.

And I've been on the other side of that too. I hit a shot right up the line - and I'm standing right on the line and I see it bounce right smack in the middle of the line - and my opponent calls it out.
ok, let's look at this from the side. You are sure it was out, but because the opponent questions, and you think he had a better view, you are willing to change the call because one of you has to be right.
So how do you decide when the opponent has a better view? Do you have like a formula: if the opponent is inside the service box, toward the ad side, and he hits the volley down the line - than you are willing to change the out call if he complains. But if he is farther out, outside the service box you would be willing to change the call only when he complains vehemently? :wink: I suppose you need to have a rule for cross court shots and the long out calls.
Now if you saw the ball out by like a foot, but the opponent is right at the net , with perfect view down the line - are you still going to change your call? I mean it was a foot out. If not - when are you going to reconsider - when it is 6 inches out, 3 inches, where is the cutout point?
My point is that you cannot be possibly 100% sure --and-- willing to change the call. Either you are sure, or you do not make any call, ask an opponent, and go by what he says. The code also accounted for 'one of us has to be wrong' case - you make calls on your side, he makes calls on his.
p.s. I'm assuming neither side is intentionally making wrong calls. There's really no point discussing cheating.

Mick
11-30-2009, 08:45 PM
the guys at my courts would always say, "i challenge your call" on the close calls and then go on to play the next point :)

sphinx780
12-05-2009, 03:03 PM
the guys at my courts would always say, "i challenge your call" on the close calls and then go on to play the next point :)

I won't be able to resist saying this in my next match. Of course it's more likely to be raised when a ball is very obviously called correctly. :shock:

Geezer Guy
12-05-2009, 08:18 PM
ok, let's look at this from the side. You are sure it was out, but because the opponent questions, and you think he had a better view, you are willing to change the call because one of you has to be right.
So how do you decide when the opponent has a better view? Do you have like a formula: if the opponent is inside the service box, toward the ad side, and he hits the volley down the line - than you are willing to change the out call if he complains. But if he is farther out, outside the service box you would be willing to change the call only when he complains vehemently? :wink: I suppose you need to have a rule for cross court shots and the long out calls.
Now if you saw the ball out by like a foot, but the opponent is right at the net , with perfect view down the line - are you still going to change your call? I mean it was a foot out. If not - when are you going to reconsider - when it is 6 inches out, 3 inches, where is the cutout point?
My point is that you cannot be possibly 100% sure --and-- willing to change the call. Either you are sure, or you do not make any call, ask an opponent, and go by what he says. The code also accounted for 'one of us has to be wrong' case - you make calls on your side, he makes calls on his.
p.s. I'm assuming neither side is intentionally making wrong calls. There's really no point discussing cheating.

If my opponent is looking right down the line and claims I missed a call, I'll go by his call - as long as I think he's not trying to cheat me. If we're both looking across the line, I figure I've got a better view of the balls on my side of the court.

TheSubdude
12-06-2009, 07:23 AM
When I ask "Are you sure?" what I really mean is, "That ball was totally in, and I saw you hook me just now. Please don't think I didn't catch that. Watch yourself, 'cause next time we're going to have a discussion about it."

I use The Magic Words because they are the ones suggested by the Code.

Weird.

This is exactly what I'm saying too.