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gzhpcu
11-24-2009, 11:51 AM
I find that the Pancho Gonzalez serve is great to model after. Yes, in those days you had to keep at least one foot in contact with the ground on serving. I find this helps to concentrate on the essentials, minus the jumping, and is easier to copy. The jumping can always be added later. His arm action is great - forearm pronation, elegant style.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhFo3hvGPI&feature=player_embedded

xcourt4hand
11-24-2009, 11:56 AM
yeah, looks good - and what about the size of the raquet head? Must be about 60 in sq!

LeeD
11-24-2009, 11:56 AM
I say NAY !
His takeback is too circular, his trophy basically non existent, his path not direct. And you can't just ADD legs and drive, you need to learn it from the start.
He had a good serve for 1960's. It's a bad serve now. He was tall and athletic, so hit harder than most of his contemporaries.
You want a 6'3" model serve, go ColinDibley, a shorter DJ, a shorter Fed, Sampras, Haas, copy them.

gzhpcu
11-24-2009, 12:56 PM
Jim McLennan, of Tennisone, has another opinion:

During the coursework in biomechanics I chose Pancho as a template for the serve, for both descriptive and comparative purposes. I used film and video footage as well as a number of books about and by Pancho. And for the next few years I looked at his serve inside and out. Even presented it at a USTA teacher’s conference in New York – “Teaching the Serve: The Pancho Gonzalez Model.”

Pancho was fluid, grounded, loose, whippy, and with a forearm roll at the top of the swing. A lot like Federer and Sampras, but not at all like many of the women this week at the US Open.

Ripper014
11-24-2009, 12:59 PM
I like this service motion... it is continuous... with a short ball toss and how can you argue with some of the best that ever played that say it was a great serve.

LeeD
11-24-2009, 01:00 PM
You can compare Gonzalez's serve to Fed and Sampras.
You will never compare the Fed/Sampras/DJ serve to Gonazalez.
G's serve was nothing compared to the above.
The above's serves were and are worlds better.
Author just has hero worship or doesn't know modern tennis.
I don't worship anyone, and only results count.

Solat
11-24-2009, 05:57 PM
its fluid, he has a very good separation of hand from shoulder

he doesn't pull his front arm down and in but this is probably related to the fact he isn't allowed to jump

Stich, Kraijeck, Jochim Johansson all have quality motions if you favour the pinpoint stance

LeeD
11-24-2009, 06:03 PM
..and all 2-4" TALLER than Pancho.... JJ is 6'6".

cl76
11-24-2009, 06:38 PM
PG's serve works well for him. Be inspired or influenced by his style. Learn something from it but understand that what you see is the result of many years of practice. You couldn't simply imitate it and get the same results.

papa
11-24-2009, 06:49 PM
I find that the Pancho Gonzalez serve is great to model after. Yes, in those days you had to keep at least one foot in contact with the ground on serving. I find this helps to concentrate on the essentials, minus the jumping, and is easier to copy. The jumping can always be added later. His arm action is great - forearm pronation, elegant style.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhFo3hvGPI&feature=player_embedded

You like it, stay with it - in my book, its technically sound even by today's standards/players. I think you chose a good model.

Fedace
11-24-2009, 06:57 PM
Andy Roddick. Most efficient motion i have ever seen..

Bungalo Bill
11-24-2009, 07:11 PM
I find that the Pancho Gonzalez serve is great to model after. Yes, in those days you had to keep at least one foot in contact with the ground on serving. I find this helps to concentrate on the essentials, minus the jumping, and is easier to copy. The jumping can always be added later. His arm action is great - forearm pronation, elegant style.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhFo3hvGPI&feature=player_embedded

Yes, that is okay. And as a player develops improvement on folding in that non-dominant arm sooner also can be recommended.

Fedace
11-25-2009, 05:54 AM
Yes, that is okay. And as a player develops improvement on folding in that non-dominant arm sooner also can be recommended.

it sucks , no power..in that ..:(

papa
11-25-2009, 07:05 AM
it sucks , no power..in that ..:(

Well, it is what it is - better than most who play the game today.

However, improvements in racquet technology, player conditioning, shoes, balls, court surfaces, etc. have changed all strokes to some degree. Not as much as some might think but they have changed and will continue to do so as long as the game is played. Just the introduction of the new net design/material (currently being used at the Masters) and modifying the let rule might/will/could effect the serve. Look what might have happened if the bigger ball had greater acceptance or the second serve eliminated altogether.

So, the model he chose is what it is and it really is pretty good. He gets himself serving this good and who knows what might develop.

LeeD
11-25-2009, 08:05 AM
I say nay to PG's serve, but it was the dominant serve in it's day.
I also say NAY to Roddick's serve, another fast mover. His serve cannot be replicated by any other human being at his tennis level.
I think something closer to stiffs like StanSmith, PeterKorda, StefanEdbergs, can easily be copied and effective by ANYONE who's above 4.0.
Edbergs would lose out on pure speed, of course, but for a twist/kick type of serve, only Cash and Rafter were close.
Stan and Korda were practically mirror images of the same simple KISS serve.

SirSweetSpot
11-25-2009, 08:34 AM
Andy Roddick. Most efficient motion i have ever seen..

Gustavo Kuerten