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View Full Version : What is the rulke in this situation?


TonyJ
11-24-2009, 06:50 PM
Dont know if this is the correct forum but didnt know where else to put it. I am just curious as to what the ruling is in the following situation. Last night was playing doubles when my partner hit a drop shot. The opposing player managed to get to the ball but in doing so went round the net and actually entered the playing surface (ie inside the court) on our side of the net.

Now my thoughts are was that if he had rounded the net and stayed outside the court (but on our side of the net) that would be ok but because he stepped into the court area on our side of the net then it is our point? is this correct and I hope this makes sense.

jswinf
11-24-2009, 07:16 PM
I'm pretty sure you're right.

papa
11-24-2009, 07:30 PM
Your point - he cannot step into your court and by the way, never invite them to do so. If a playing in running down a ball ends up in the stands they have "technically" crossed the imaginary extension line of the net. I have seen several situations where this hasn't been an issue, like in running down a shot and ending up in the stands. However, if they come into your court, like making a shot and jumping the net, they lose the point.

Additionally, they cannot position themselves in such a manner, either on purpose or accidently, even on their own side which prevents you from returning the ball. For instance they cannot position themselves in a way that you feel you might injure them or not be able to follow through on your swing, even though that follow through is on their side of the net.

Geezer Guy
11-24-2009, 08:47 PM
papa's first point is correct. I'll just add that if you're playing doubles they cannot come onto the doubles court. If you're playing singles they can come into the doubles alley, but not onto the singles court. Same is true for a racquet or even a dampener that may happen to "fly" during a point.

I have no knowledge about papa's second point, but wouldn't surprise me if it's correct as well.

papa
11-25-2009, 07:21 AM
I have no knowledge about papa's second point, but wouldn't surprise me if it's correct as well.

Well, your correct about the addition of anything flying off the racquet or off of you/out of you even like a hat or gum. As you know, all it has to do is hit the net it does not have to come over it.

On the second point if you get in my way or prevent me from doing what I normally would, its a hindrance. Now, you can and should take up a position which makes me take a shot maybe with more risk involved but you cannot do something that physically prevents me from either making the shot or you present yourself, position wise, in such a manner that I might hold back fearing I'm going to hurt you - like standing at the net with the racquet down around your ankles. Shots that are widely excepted at one level are not acceptable at others. I think we discussed this at length during the "mixed doubles" thread.

fuzz nation
11-26-2009, 04:42 PM
That's your point as long as your opponent touched your court while the ball was still in play.

5263
11-26-2009, 05:00 PM
That's your point as long as your opponent touched your court while the ball was still in play.

This is the one I was looking for before posting it again.

woodrow1029
11-26-2009, 10:49 PM
Well, your correct about the addition of anything flying off the racquet or off of you/out of you even like a hat or gum. As you know, all it has to do is hit the net it does not have to come over it.

On the second point if you get in my way or prevent me from doing what I normally would, its a hindrance. Now, you can and should take up a position which makes me take a shot maybe with more risk involved but you cannot do something that physically prevents me from either making the shot or you present yourself, position wise, in such a manner that I might hold back fearing I'm going to hurt you - like standing at the net with the racquet down around your ankles. Shots that are widely excepted at one level are not acceptable at others. I think we discussed this at length during the "mixed doubles" thread.
That's way out there. You can position yourself wherever you want as long as you're not in your opponent's court. What you can't do is wave your arms or racket or do anything with the deliberate intent of solely distracting the opponent.

papa
11-27-2009, 12:22 PM
That's way out there. You can position yourself wherever you want as long as you're not in your opponent's court. What you can't do is wave your arms or racket or do anything with the deliberate intent of solely distracting the opponent.

Sorry, it isn't. You are correct in your statement as far as it goes although you cannot, for example, position yourself in the serve box when your partner is returning serve.

xFullCourtTenniSx
11-27-2009, 01:07 PM
Sorry, it isn't. You are correct in your statement as far as it goes although you cannot, for example, position yourself in the serve box when your partner is returning serve.

Okay, the scenario mentioned before was valid, but this is just bull. You CAN position yourself in the service box to return serve if you want to. It's just that it's not smart to.

The reason you can't block their follow through is because that is a hindrance in their ability to produce the shot and play properly. Standing in the service box is a pure absurdity, but it has no real effect on how the other player serves the ball.

As to woodrow's point, you're right, but the idea is to prevent the one player from purposely, through his actions other than those to get the ball over, affecting the other players ability to produce a shot like they normally would by physically preventing them to hit the ball or purposely trying to distract them.

People actually get away with it on the pro tour though. Haas and Federer at Wimbledon this year would be the most recent one I know of.

woodrow1029
11-27-2009, 04:28 PM
You can stand in the service box while your partner is receiving EXCEPT in collegiate tennis. In college, this is not allowed.

papa
11-27-2009, 05:00 PM
You can stand in the service box while your partner is receiving EXCEPT in collegiate tennis. In college, this is not allowed.

OK, might have it confused with college tennis, I'll check. I do know that it has been a hindrance issue but again, I'll check it out.

papa
11-28-2009, 07:54 PM
Well, as mentioned by woodrow 1029, this is an ITA rule in section C, par 3. ".......The receiver's partner shall not stand in the reciever's service box before or during the serve.

I am also aware of what I remember as some type of ruling regarding standing in the box that came up a couple of years ago. As I recall, and my mind is a little fuzzy here, is that the sole reason the receiver's partner was taking up a position in the box in the first, because he was not eligible to hit the shot, was considered to be a deliberate hindrance and should not be allowed if the server objected. I live in two different places during the year and most of my tennis reference material is at my other address.

woodrow1029
11-28-2009, 07:55 PM
OK, might have it confused with college tennis, I'll check. I do know that it has been a hindrance issue but again, I'll check it out.

It's a hindrance issue if the player is standing in the box and jumping up and down waving their racket around during the service motion. As far as just standing there, the receiver and partner can stand in any position they want during the serve.

woodrow1029
11-28-2009, 07:55 PM
Papa, you can consider me as a tennis reference as far as the rules go.

papa
11-29-2009, 02:09 PM
Papa, you can consider me as a tennis reference as far as the rules go.

OK, I'll keep that in mind and based on what I've seen so far, you would be an excellent reference. Its funny though, you think you know something but then realize there are different rules for HS, college, USTA, WTT, Olympic, and so forth. Gets confusing although the bulk of the rules are similiar.

Thanks again for the help - spent the day at Bollettieri (IMG) watching the Eddie Herr. Think there are some 2000 players from 200 countries.