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Heroesque
11-28-2009, 08:43 PM
My coach said that my forehand doesn't extend through all the way. I understand the idea, that I pull my arm in prematurely...but I just can't seem to do it. Are there any tips or tricks to help me? We've been working on this for quite a long time T.T

Also, for high top-spin lobs that go over your head when you're behind the baseline, what would be a better idea? Hitting a more uncomfortable forehand, or overheading it (almost like a pseudo-serve)?

LeeD
11-29-2009, 08:51 AM
I'll try....
Assuming you hit forehands with elbows close to body, you should have good consistency and little power. For more power, use a longer leverage arm...extend the arm so elbow is almost straight. If you like your forehand, don't change it, practice it 'till it's a real weapon.
As for the second.... depends if your overhead is better than your high forehand groundie ..

5263
11-29-2009, 09:47 AM
I teach the MTM style, which has you bring the racket forward to align for contact from below the ball path, then right at contact to accelerate the racket "up and Across" the ball. As you pull across (and up) the ball, you get the extension you need during that change of direction, but it is not extension out towards the target with your hand. May not be what your coach is looking for, but much better IMO. Major ball control with excellent power.

Freestyle
11-29-2009, 10:38 AM
I teach the MTM style, which has you bring the racket forward to align for contact from below the ball path, then right at contact to accelerate the racket "up and Across" the ball. As you pull across (and up) the ball, you get the extension you need during that change of direction, but it is not extension out towards the target. May not be what your coach is looking for, but much better IMO. Major ball control with excellent power.

What do you mean by across? As in side-to-side? Diagonally?

5263
11-29-2009, 11:50 AM
What do you mean by across? As in side-to-side? Diagonally?

It is more of a diagonal, which accounts for the "UP and Across".
Everyone goes across with their swings, they usually they start across "after" the ball is struck. We want to start across going into the contact.

ms87
11-29-2009, 12:29 PM
I'll try....
Assuming you hit forehands with elbows close to body, you should have good consistency and little power. For more power, use a longer leverage arm...extend the arm so elbow is almost straight. If you like your forehand, don't change it, practice it 'till it's a real weapon.
As for the second.... depends if your overhead is better than your high forehand groundie ..

extension has nothing to do with the extent of the elbow bend, which is itself a function of grip and wrist angle

LeeD
11-29-2009, 12:54 PM
Sure, 90 degree bent elbows mean nothing and affect nothing.....

fuzz nation
12-02-2009, 08:56 AM
My coach said that my forehand doesn't extend through all the way. I understand the idea, that I pull my arm in prematurely...but I just can't seem to do it. Are there any tips or tricks to help me? We've been working on this for quite a long time T.T

Also, for high top-spin lobs that go over your head when you're behind the baseline, what would be a better idea? Hitting a more uncomfortable forehand, or overheading it (almost like a pseudo-serve)?

Second part first: If that ball is above my head high enough that I can hit it with sort of a slice serve type of shot, that's very reliable for me. I can even bend my knees to make this work when the ball is only slightly higher than my head. I'm also comfortable with a forehand slice which works great for me when the ball is up around chest or head height (too low for that serve motion).

One thing you might want to try to get used to that extension you want on your forehand is to have a hitting partner feed you some balls. Alternate between hitting a couple forehands that come right to you, then hitting a couple that you have to move laterally a few steps to hit. Usually the balls that we need to chase down are hit with better extension (often out of necessity) than the ones that come right to us. Pay attention to any difference in your contact between these two types of forehands and it may teach you to "get away" from balls that are hit closer to you. That can help to duplicate the feel of that well extended forehand you hit on the move.