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Cindysphinx
11-30-2009, 06:14 AM
Well, it finally happened. I actually got mad at someone. And now I feel guilty about it. :(

We were playing a 7.0 mixed match against one of the top teams. The woman was a 3.0 (bumped last night to 3.5) and the guy was a 4.0 (bumped last night to 4.5). My partner (bumped from 3.5 to 4.0) and I were therefore overmatched by .5. And we were getting killed. We were coming nowhere close to breaking this guy's serve, as he was serving bombs *and* following them to net. Ah well. Sometimes you just know it's not your night.

Anyway, this guy is serving at 5-3 for the first set. He serves a blast to my partner on set point, and it is long. I call it long, and my partner calls it long at the same time he drives a return. The guy walks to net and says something I can't quite hear. I figure he is going to question the line call, so I walk up to hear him out. It goes down like this:

"Yeah, what's up?"

"That serve was out, so your partner's not supposed to return it. That's against the rules. I'm entitled to two serves now."

"No, you're not. The rule says we're not to play obviously out faults. That ball was out, but it wasn't obviously out."

"Nope, you're wrong. The rules say I get a let when you do that. I have the rules in my bag."

"Where in the rules does it say that? You better go get those rules out of your bag, then. 'Cause if you can show me that you get two serves if my partner can't stop his swing on a fast serve, I'll give you two serves every time."

"The rules say I can call a let whenever I want!"

"That's ridiculous. If you want us not to return out serves, you're going to need to serve a lot slower."

At this point, he turned and walked back to the baseline and shouted over his shoulder: "GAMESMANSHIP!"

When everyone had taken their positions, I said: "SECOND SERVE!!" OK, I admit I shouldn't have done that. I did it specifically to twist the knife. Normally, I would have given someone two serves if we needed to have some big discussion between first and second serve.

He looked up and shot me a murderous look, then proceeded to serve another bomb, my partner popped it up, this guy smashed it and then jumped up and down and whooped a bit to celebrate winning the first set.

During the second set, he suddenly became very interested in the score. I was serving, and for obvious reasons I was struggling to come up with any serve this guy wouldn't blast back at me. I finally nailed a pretty good one, and he caught it and said, "Score, please." I said, "I announced the score as 30-15." He flicks the ball back at me and says, "I didn't hear you."

The weird thing is that he was otherwise a nice guy. After the match, which we lost 3 and 3, he and I hit for about 30 minutes, and then I chatted with him and his wife for a while. Both were nice people, so bygones were bygones, apparently.

But something about his bluffing about having the rules, his accusing us of gaming him, and that ridiculous notion that he can call a let whenever he wants really pushed my buttons. Dude, you're killing us already, and now you don't want us to swing at your 100 mph rockets?

borg number one
11-30-2009, 07:05 AM
You handled it EXACTLY right Cindysphinx. You were right on the rule and he was the one that was engaging in Gamesmanship. I don't really call what you did "getting mad". You were just standing up for what is right and you did not allow him to basically get away with his attempt to intimidate. His saying that he can call a "let" whenever he wants makes no sense at all. Plus, you and your partner called that ball out. Returning serves that are out happens all the time. You can't be expected to suddenly stop your swing mid-way during the return, because often serves are just barely out and you have to really focus on the line and ball to even see it out. There is no way that one can avoid hitting returns back in that situation. There was no intent to somehow distract in any way. Once the call is made, there is no "live point". There is simply a period during which the server gets ready to hit the second serve. That's different than say hitting a stray ball towards the fence DURING a second serve toss. Now that's cause for a let. That guy needs to play some more matches against experience players. That may provide him more of the tennis "lessons' he apparently needs. What a jerk! He was basically being guy that is a "tennis bully" against weaker players. His play should have been enough, without such nonsense.

Tyrus
11-30-2009, 07:11 AM
When he caught the ball, i would have said 40-15 since he failed to return it. There are soooooo many players who don't even announce the score which leads me to believe he was honestly just being a dick.

sureshs
11-30-2009, 07:11 AM
That is why mixed dubs sucks. Men tend to be more obnoxious in this setting. And usually the women set them up for it by adopting a us-vs-them attitude from the start and creating a "couple" when there isn't one.

Sup2Dresq
11-30-2009, 07:11 AM
Hehehe. I would of loved to see your reaction if he hit an overhead right at you.

http://www.channel4.com/film/media/images/Channel4/film/L/little_nicky_xl_01--film-A.jpg

eagle
11-30-2009, 07:42 AM
Good for you. You did the right thing.

Stand your ground if you know you're correct.

He knew he was wrong but hoping you'd back down and he'd get a free pass.

While chatting with them after the match, I would have jokingly "applauded" him for his bluff and asked him if he seriously thought he'd get away with it.

r,
eagle

Ripper014
11-30-2009, 07:55 AM
I am surprised you wanted to spend time with him after the match. As for the score when he asked for it I would have told him that it was now 40-15... and proceeded to serve into the deuce service box.

It is pretty obvious he is the one using gamesmanship... and I would tell him to grow up... that he is old enough not to employ such tactics.

You are going to find all kinds of people in tennis... just as in life... when you run into these types of people... they are just trying to throw you off your game. It is always best to let it slide... never let them know you are heated... stick to your guns... don't give them an inch... and smile, killing them with kindness... it usually ruffles their feathers when they don't get the reaction they expect from you.

onehandbh
11-30-2009, 10:08 AM
The weird thing is that he was otherwise a nice guy. After the match, which we lost 3 and 3, he and I hit for about 30 minutes, and then I chatted with him and his wife for a while. Both were nice people, so bygones were bygones, apparently.



Otherwise a nice guy? This guy sounds nuts. I bet if your team
would have somehow come back and won, he wouldn't have
been so nice after the match. btw, you should have taken
the point when he caught your serve. It's one thing to be
frustrated and mad at yourself, etc, but to be such word that
rhymes with stick about it.


He looked up and shot me a murderous look, then proceeded to serve another bomb, my partner popped it up, this guy smashed it and then jumped up and down and whooped a bit to celebrate winning the first set.


After he did this, you should have replied:
"Wowee... you so big and strong. We make
hulk angry. He serve harder. Little old ladies have no chance."

ksteph
11-30-2009, 10:16 AM
All I can say is BRAVO Cindy!!!!!! This guy was clearly trying to rattle you and you stood your ground. You go girl! That's the only thing that I hate in playing mixed doubles is that some men try to bully their way around that court.

jorel
11-30-2009, 10:17 AM
people show their true selves in competition

for example... im a baby

jazzyfunkybluesy
11-30-2009, 10:23 AM
people show their true selves in competition

for example... im a baby

Ha, brave funny honest.

Cindysphinx
11-30-2009, 11:04 AM
Still, I don't like losing my cool on a tennis court. It is stupid, and it is no fun for anyone. Yelling for the sole purpose of making someone else angry? Not my style.

I think I will now go get my pocket-sized friend at court off my desk and put it in my bag, though. I didn't have my Code with me, or that would have been the longest delay between first and second serve in the history of USTA league play.

sphinx780
11-30-2009, 11:08 AM
Dude was an *****. People always seem to forget this is social tennis. Compete, fight, have fun...it's all good. I just don't find it enjoyable when there's a need to babysit an adult who apparently has forgotten they reached their 4th birthday...years ago. You did what you could.

Just be glad you don't spend your time on court like him...what a waste.

JavierLW
11-30-2009, 11:30 AM
Ha ha, kudos for inviting him to go get his rulebook. I always wanted to do that.

Dont you hate it when people just make up their own rules and dont back it up??? :rolleyes:

Steady Eddy
11-30-2009, 11:38 AM
We all like to believe that we're in control of ourselves at all times, but the truth is that we can sometimes be under the influence of our emotions for a while. I think that happened to him, and that's why afterward you saw that he was ok. The conflict happened in the moment and later he was calmer and probably embarrassed by the trouble.

BTW, I feel a bit sympathetic for him because I don't like it when people return my out serves. I can't remember the last time I did it, but if I did that, I'd say, "take two". Otherwise it seems like I'm thinking, "Oh boy, he's gotta walk back to the baseline and put in a second serve. Our chance to collect a double and win a point!" A double fault is a loss of point, that's how it should be, but one ought not to be hunting for them, IMO. (Not that you were, but it's better to not make an opponent serve the 2nd 'cold'). It might feel like this is fair because he's got a tough serve, but he very likely worked hard to acquire it and it's discouraging when people don't give you two for that reason. (If this was someone with a powder puff serve would you still have held them to 'second serve', or would you have let them start the point over?)

Also, while I'm sure you're giving a balanced account, we still are hearing only one side. Were his out serves being returned often and he got frustrated, or did he do this the first time it occurred? Did he catch a ball and ask for the score out of nowhere, or was he often finding it hard to hear the score? People aren't perfect, feelings get bruised during doubles. As long as no one gets too out of line and decide to get along at the end, just let bygones be bygones.

Cindysphinx
11-30-2009, 11:45 AM
Hey, it's hard to view the thing from his viewpoint, of course.

Was my partner returning out serves? Well, I find it embarrassing when my partners do this, as some people make a very bad habit of it. I didn't notice anything amiss before this guy's tantrum, and I have played about seven doubles matches with this particular partner. And the mature way to handle it is simply to ask on a changeover or between points for us to be more careful.

Was I hoping he would miss because he was cold? I didn't care, honestly. I felt the delay was his own fault as per the Code, so he wasn't entitled to a second serve for those reasons. I thought he showed a basic lack of common sense in taking issue with this before his second serve.

As for announcing the score, I announce the score before I take up my position at the baseline, and I sometimes announce it a second time. This is because I am addled and frequently forget the score. It is unprecedented for anyone to claim i am not saying the score, as I am rather loud about it because I think the purpose is to communicate to someone very far away, and I don't like having my service interrupted with questions about the score.

I'm uh . . . not a Low Talker.

Mick
11-30-2009, 11:48 AM
i am thinking you two must be a pretty good doubles team for the guy to behave like that :)

Steady Eddy
11-30-2009, 11:53 AM
Hey, it's hard to view the thing from his viewpoint, of course.

Ok. Hope it's ok being the "devil's advocate". :twisted:

maverick66
11-30-2009, 11:58 AM
Still, I don't like losing my cool on a tennis court. It is stupid, and it is no fun for anyone. Yelling for the sole purpose of making someone else angry? Not my style.

I dont see it as loosing your cool more standing up for yourself. The guy was being a jerk and you held your ground. Never back away when you know your right on a tennis court. The situation could have been a lot worse and good job to your partner if I was your partner I wouldn't have bit my tongue if he started yelling at you. I think you handled this as about as good as it can be. Ive seen this kind of stuff lead to fist fights at juniors and low level pros.

SplitStepper
11-30-2009, 12:03 PM
You know, people just suck these days. It amazes me how pathetically egocentric ALOT of people can be. Competition can bring out the absolute best or WORST in a person. People need to relax and realize they are playing CLUB TENNIS. the pro's have millions on the line and yet most can stay under control. Sometimes I am incredibly embarrassed to be part of the human race. This world is doomed.....2012 here we come.

Steady Eddy
11-30-2009, 06:34 PM
You know, people just suck these days. It amazes me how pathetically egocentric ALOT of people can be. Competition can bring out the absolute best or WORST in a person. People need to relax and realize they are playing CLUB TENNIS. the pro's have millions on the line and yet most can stay under control. Sometimes I am incredibly embarrassed to be part of the human race. This world is doomed.....2012 here we come.It was just a tennis match.

EKnee08
12-01-2009, 05:29 AM
Well, it finally happened. I actually got mad at someone. And now I feel guilty about it. :(

We were playing a 7.0 mixed match against one of the top teams. The woman was a 3.0 (bumped last night to 3.5) and the guy was a 4.0 (bumped last night to 4.5). My partner (bumped from 3.5 to 4.0) and I were therefore overmatched by .5. And we were getting killed. We were coming nowhere close to breaking this guy's serve, as he was serving bombs *and* following them to net. Ah well. Sometimes you just know it's not your night.

Anyway, this guy is serving at 5-3 for the first set. He serves a blast to my partner on set point, and it is long. I call it long, and my partner calls it long at the same time he drives a return. The guy walks to net and says something I can't quite hear. I figure he is going to question the line call, so I walk up to hear him out. It goes down like this:

"Yeah, what's up?"

"That serve was out, so your partner's not supposed to return it. That's against the rules. I'm entitled to two serves now."

"No, you're not. The rule says we're not to play obviously out faults. That ball was out, but it wasn't obviously out."

"Nope, you're wrong. The rules say I get a let when you do that. I have the rules in my bag."

"Where in the rules does it say that? You better go get those rules out of your bag, then. 'Cause if you can show me that you get two serves if my partner can't stop his swing on a fast serve, I'll give you two serves every time."

"The rules say I can call a let whenever I want!"

"That's ridiculous. If you want us not to return out serves, you're going to need to serve a lot slower."

At this point, he turned and walked back to the baseline and shouted over his shoulder: "GAMESMANSHIP!"

When everyone had taken their positions, I said: "SECOND SERVE!!" OK, I admit I shouldn't have done that. I did it specifically to twist the knife. Normally, I would have given someone two serves if we needed to have some big discussion between first and second serve.

He looked up and shot me a murderous look, then proceeded to serve another bomb, my partner popped it up, this guy smashed it and then jumped up and down and whooped a bit to celebrate winning the first set.

During the second set, he suddenly became very interested in the score. I was serving, and for obvious reasons I was struggling to come up with any serve this guy wouldn't blast back at me. I finally nailed a pretty good one, and he caught it and said, "Score, please." I said, "I announced the score as 30-15." He flicks the ball back at me and says, "I didn't hear you."

The weird thing is that he was otherwise a nice guy. After the match, which we lost 3 and 3, he and I hit for about 30 minutes, and then I chatted with him and his wife for a while. Both were nice people, so bygones were bygones, apparently.

But something about his bluffing about having the rules, his accusing us of gaming him, and that ridiculous notion that he can call a let whenever he wants really pushed my buttons. Dude, you're killing us already, and now you don't want us to swing at your 100 mph rockets?

WHAT A JERK! You handled yourself great! This guy can't be too nice of a guy because when something is on the line, when he competes for something, he behaves this way... And what was he really competing for, not millions in prize money. At the best, he is a split personality!

SplitStepper
12-01-2009, 05:43 AM
It was just a tennis match.

Exactly...its not as if the simple game is so important that you have to act like the last breath of air is on the line. If you are at the mercy of your emotions on a tennis court, a CLUB TENNIS COURT, you need some therapy dude. Whats next, you go home and beat your dog cause you lost? Thats the problem, no one knows how to lose gracefully.

BMC9670
12-01-2009, 06:21 AM
From another perspective, I think tennis is relatively calm when it comes to getting into it with people. I've played a lot of adult league basketball and am always amazed at the level of ego, attitude, and fighting that goes on. It's like people think they're in the NBA or something. Also, getting into it on a basketball court leads to thrown elbows, hard fouls, and the occasional fist fight.

Maybe I've been lucky, but since moving to tennis, I find it relatively free of this behavior. And the little I've run into, the guy is waaaay over on the other side of the net, which means no physical confrontation.

Ken Honecker
12-02-2009, 03:04 AM
Some people just try to see what they can get past you and once they realize you don't fall for their BS they turn out to be OK people. As far as hitting out serves back I do it if they are close because I'm already in my motion, I do refrain from running into the next court to return ones however.

I play a fair amount of sports and am simply amazed by the number of people who don't know the rules. This year in about our 14th softball game we met one team that hadn't a clue on several rules and we wondered how they had managed to get that far without common things coming up even if they happened to be tyros.

BMC9670
12-02-2009, 04:53 AM
I'll admit that I didn't know it was a rule to return obvious service faults. In my matches with friends we do it all the time, mainly with the intention of just giving the ball back to the server.

...OK, and sometimes to work out some timing issues.:)

Steady Eddy
12-02-2009, 05:05 AM
I'll admit that I didn't know it was a rule to return obvious service faults. In my matches with friends we do it all the time, mainly with the intention of just giving the ball back to the server.

...OK, and sometimes to work out some timing issues.:)
Now you know! Also, that's not as bad if you hit the fault back to the server so he doesn't have to interrupt his serve to clear a ball. Here's the idea: everybody knows how servers like to do the 2nd serve immediately after the 1st, the don't want a big delay. That's why most people collect two balls before starting a point. When the receiver smacks a fault over the net, it gets in the way and creates an interruption.

Why so many people do this, I think, is because announcers on tv say that it's a good idea. They say, "Always return it, it might be called good." But this doesn't apply to matches with no ball girls or ball boys and you're calling your own side. You're making the call, if it's out, you'll call it out. Also, if a pro returns it, it doesn't mess with the server 'cause of the ball boy. BUT, this isn't the case in regular sets so DON'T chase down that errant serve, smack a winner, and then yell, "OUT!". It's really annoying. And while it's too bad the set became unpleasant, Cyndi's team started it. That's what I have trouble getting past.

equinox
12-02-2009, 05:09 AM
heh, have to love mixed tennis, brings out best psycho in everyone.

Could have been worse in mens tennis, expect chest bumps swearing in the face and threats to kill (knifing) in the car park.
All from pegging someone at 3/4 court with forehand...
Tennis gotta love it. lol branding.

equinox
12-02-2009, 05:33 AM
Why so many people do this, I think, is because announcers on tv say that it's a good idea. They say, "Always return it, it might be called good." But this doesn't apply to matches with no ball girls or ball boys and you're calling your own side. You're making the call, if it's out, you'll call it out. Also, if a pro returns it, it doesn't mess with the server 'cause of the ball boy. BUT, this isn't the case in regular sets so DON'T chase down that errant serve, smack a winner, and then yell, "OUT!". It's really annoying. And while it's too bad the set became unpleasant, Cyndi's team started it. That's what I have trouble getting past.

With a ball served fast over the net there simply isn't enough reaction time between bounce and contact for the mind and body to adjust the swing motion.
The returners swing is already in motion and it's to late / awkward to adjust for a fault serve.

So you're suggesting that everyone only starts swinging for the return once the ball has bounced? or maybe guessing based on the height the ball is crossing over the net? hello ace kickers? lol nice way to push up the ace count. :p

I say better to swing away (not at the net player) and call fault than get aced. :)

Cindysphinx
12-02-2009, 06:02 AM
I wouldn't say our team "started it." That assumes my partner was playing obvious faults. I don't think he was.

blakesq
12-02-2009, 06:13 AM
Steady Eddy, maybe at 3.0 tennis, people hit dinky serves. But at higher level tennis, when fast and hard serves come in, you must attempt to make a good return, because there is not enough time to determine whether a serve is a going out to stop your return preparation.

Now you know! Also, that's not as bad if you hit the fault back to the server so he doesn't have to interrupt his serve to clear a ball. Here's the idea: everybody knows how servers like to do the 2nd serve immediately after the 1st, the don't want a big delay. That's why most people collect two balls before starting a point. When the receiver smacks a fault over the net, it gets in the way and creates an interruption.

Why so many people do this, I think, is because announcers on tv say that it's a good idea. They say, "Always return it, it might be called good." But this doesn't apply to matches with no ball girls or ball boys and you're calling your own side. You're making the call, if it's out, you'll call it out. Also, if a pro returns it, it doesn't mess with the server 'cause of the ball boy. BUT, this isn't the case in regular sets so DON'T chase down that errant serve, smack a winner, and then yell, "OUT!". It's really annoying. And while it's too bad the set became unpleasant, Cyndi's team started it. That's what I have trouble getting past.

Ripper014
12-02-2009, 07:31 AM
Steady Eddy, maybe at 3.0 tennis, people hit dinky serves. But at higher level tennis, when fast and hard serves come in, you must attempt to make a good return, because there is not enough time to determine whether a serve is a going out to stop your return preparation.

Absolutely... there have been times where I didn't swing at a return only to have it land in... :oops:

If the ball is obviously out I will let it stop it and put it in my pocket... but on first serves there are times the ball is just coming to fast. If my first thought was not to return the ball... I wouldn't whether it was in or not... and on a second serve, it doesn't matter if it is in or not.

Oldracquet27
12-02-2009, 08:07 AM
That you played half an hour after the match with them. As per what you said the guy is a jerk, considering it was even a mixed match with ladies present. I know a lot of people and i sure you also do, that want to step on you , are disrespecful , and all... and still play it like they are "NICE". Authentic nice people would never say what he said, i think YOU ARE the Nice one, who calmed down and played them for extra time.

I have a rule of not going down to their level and being a jerk myself, but certainly letting this type of people know how jerks they are. If i don't do it, i always feel bad with myself, because i know they will do the same thing to somebody else. They never change!

kylebarendrick
12-02-2009, 08:32 AM
A hard first serve within a foot of the service line will be returned. As others have said, there simply isn't time to stop your attempt at returning the ball in that situation. This is why the rule states that "obvious" faults should not be returned.

The ones that get me are when the serve hits the tape, bounces high, and lands 6 feet out. There is no reason to fire that ball back at me.

BMC9670
12-02-2009, 08:55 AM
Absolutely... there have been times where I didn't swing at a return only to have it land in... :oops:


This has even happened to me on heavy topspin second serves. They look like they will be long, but sometimes catch the line because of the heavy spin.

BMC9670
12-02-2009, 08:55 AM
^^^ Hey, my 100th post. what do I win?:)

Cindysphinx
12-02-2009, 09:04 AM
Ironically, where I see a lot of people playing obvious faults is at the lower levels when the serve speeds are slower.

When I played 6.5 combo, it seemed that a large majority of the players had developed a habit of playing obvious faults. Now, you know the serves are not coming that fast, yet the returner either takes a big cut at the fault or they loft it nicely back to the server.

When I captained 3.0 and 3.5, I sent messages now and then to the team reminding them of this rule (whenever I saw it being violated in practices or matches). Nevertheless, the practice continued. One 3.0 partner was so bad about it that I talked to her about it during a practice match. She said she is just returning the ball to the server. I explained the rule, and she kept right on doing it. Oy.

lethalphorce
12-02-2009, 11:18 AM
Ironically, where I see a lot of people playing obvious faults is at the lower levels when the serve speeds are slower.

When I played 6.5 combo, it seemed that a large majority of the players had developed a habit of playing obvious faults. Now, you know the serves are not coming that fast, yet the returner either takes a big cut at the fault or they loft it nicely back to the server.

When I captained 3.0 and 3.5, I sent messages now and then to the team reminding them of this rule (whenever I saw it being violated in practices or matches). Nevertheless, the practice continued. One 3.0 partner was so bad about it that I talked to her about it during a practice match. She said she is just returning the ball to the server. I explained the rule, and she kept right on doing it. Oy.

Are you saying that it's not OK to hit the ball softly back to the server? I do this myself because it seems like the most decent thing to do. I agree that it would be poor etiquette to crush a return when the serve is obviously out and moving slowly. . . but to just guide the ball back to the server can't be wrong, can it?

precision2b
12-02-2009, 11:44 AM
Exactly...its not as if the simple game is so important that you have to act like the last breath of air is on the line. If you are at the mercy of your emotions on a tennis court, a CLUB TENNIS COURT, you need some therapy dude. Whats next, you go home and beat your dog cause you lost? Thats the problem, no one knows how to lose gracefully.

I tried that, didn’t work, dog bite me…:oops:

Steady Eddy
12-02-2009, 11:50 AM
With a ball served fast over the net there simply isn't enough reaction time between bounce and contact for the mind and body to adjust the swing motion.

A VERY fast serve is different. Even for fast ones though, I think alot of players know immediately when it's going out, even if it's close.

Steady Eddy, maybe at 3.0 tennis, people hit dinky serves. But at higher level tennis, when fast and hard serves come in, you must attempt to make a good return, because there is not enough time to determine whether a serve is a going out to stop your return preparation.I think you can prevent returning out serves most of the time with a little effort. But even when I played 3.0 tennis, (especially 3.0 tennis), people were always galloping after way, way out serves, slamming them cross-court, then cupping their hand to their mouth and yelling "Out!". That's annoying.


The ones that get me are when the serve hits the tape, bounces high, and lands 6 feet out. There is no reason to fire that ball back at me.
Are you listening you people that do this? I KNOW you're out there.
Ironically, where I see a lot of people playing obvious faults is at the lower levels when the serve speeds are slower.

When I played 6.5 combo, it seemed that a large majority of the players had developed a habit of playing obvious faults. Now, you know the serves are not coming that fast, yet the returner either takes a big cut at the fault or they loft it nicely back to the server.

When I captained 3.0 and 3.5, I sent messages now and then to the team reminding them of this rule (whenever I saw it being violated in practices or matches). Nevertheless, the practice continued. One 3.0 partner was so bad about it that I talked to her about it during a practice match. She said she is just returning the ball to the server. I explained the rule, and she kept right on doing it. Oy.
If there is a god, these people will be in the deepest pit of hell.
Are you saying that it's not OK to hit the ball softly back to the server? I do this myself because it seems like the most decent thing to do. I agree that it would be poor etiquette to crush a return when the serve is obviously out and moving slowly. . . but to just guide the ball back to the server can't be wrong, can it?
That's ok. That doesn't interrupt the server and might sometimes be the best way of keeping the ball out of everyone's way. But I remember reading this, "When the serve is out, I love cranking a winner, just to show the server how I so owned that serve." So, many not only do this, they do it on purpose. To you people, be afraid, be VERY AFRAID!! :evil:

Cindysphinx
12-02-2009, 12:02 PM
Are you saying that it's not OK to hit the ball softly back to the server? I do this myself because it seems like the most decent thing to do. I agree that it would be poor etiquette to crush a return when the serve is obviously out and moving slowly. . . but to just guide the ball back to the server can't be wrong, can it?

It is not OK to hit the ball back to the server. You are supposed to grab it and hold it or knock it into the net or somewhere out of the way. If the serve is very slow, catch and hold is the best.

If you loft it to the server, the server must catch it (perhaps needing to move to do this). If she misses it, she must go retrieve it. If she has already taken the second ball out of her skirt, she must now put it back. Either way, you have unnecessarily interrupted her serve *for no benefit to anyone.*

Annika
12-02-2009, 01:24 PM
Cindy's right. Just tap it over to the side or the net. Let it be and allow the server to serve her next ball. Sheesh!

SuperFly
12-02-2009, 02:04 PM
Yessss....

let the rage flow THROUGH you...

Now do you feel the power... of the DARK SIDE?...

precision2b
12-03-2009, 08:23 AM
It is not OK to hit the ball back to the server. You are supposed to grab it and hold it or knock it into the net or somewhere out of the way. If the serve is very slow, catch and hold is the best.

If you loft it to the server, the server must catch it (perhaps needing to move to do this). If she misses it, she must go retrieve it. If she has already taken the second ball out of her skirt, she must now put it back. Either way, you have unnecessarily interrupted her serve *for no benefit to anyone.*

I agree totally Cindy, but the last part, I have played when I honestly think that the opponent hit the out serve back to try to distract the server… And that burns my butt… :evil: