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View Full Version : What's it like to BEAT tennis/golfer elbow?


yemenmocha
12-02-2009, 03:51 PM
Do you suddenly notice a few days of no pain? Do you wait for a few weeks of no pain?

Do you still have occasional pain and then resume tennis but the previous levels of pain don't come back?

Anyone ever think that you had it beat but then it came right back?

Is the "no more pain" criterion the best one to go by for deciding to start tennis again?

charliefedererer
12-02-2009, 04:02 PM
Do you suddenly notice a few days of no pain? Do you wait for a few weeks of no pain?

Do you still have occasional pain and then resume tennis but the previous levels of pain don't come back?

Anyone ever think that you had it beat but then it came right back?

Is the "no more pain" criterion the best one to go by for deciding to start tennis again?

Pain=active inflammation.
No pain means the inflammation has subsided.
It's best to start out with some 15 minute sessions of relatively easy hitting. There is no sense in getting roaring inflammation going. If it's still sore, give it more rest, but if there is no pain gradually add in longer sessions. And this is the time to add in wrist curls or work with a Flexbar to help build up the forearm muscles to help prevent a recurrence.

yemenmocha
12-02-2009, 05:46 PM
Ok I've been off tennis for about 10 consecutive months. Over the last couple months I'm able to do all of the PT training I was taught, and more traditional weightlifting as well.

Occasionally I get a little "shock" of pain from the elbow when doing certain mundane activities like opening a bottle, shampooing hair, or pressing a button. Is this some sort of inflammation? It's rather quick, almost like an electric shock, and then it's gone.



Other than this, I only feel some pain if I try to do lat pulldowns with palms facing outwards, pullups with palms facing outwards, or push-ups with palms facing down (instead I use those handlebars that allow a side facing palm). Basically when there's a very large amount of weight put into the stretch of those medial epicondyles I'll get some pain. But, I can do bicep curls with 25 lbs. and feel no pain at all. Same with chin-ups with palms inwards (no pain).

mike53
12-03-2009, 06:47 AM
It is becoming more and more accepted the sometimes intermittent pain in a specific area can be "referred" from a root cause that exists in another location. These root causes are sometimes generically called "trigger points". These trigger points are within the muscle bodies and may be dense, stiff, spastic and sore to the touch. So possibly pain in the tendonous area of the elbow may be referred from trigger points in the larger muscles of the upper arm or back.

To some extent, you can self treat this with a foam roller. If that doesn't work for you, you're no worse off than before you started.