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star 5 15
12-02-2009, 04:45 PM
I'm 16 and have had this problem since spring of 2007. it would just flare up here an there a little bit and a week off of tennis would take care of it. Since then in May I hit a serve and messed it up and it has been horrible ever since. tried playing but have had to through excruciating pain. i have been to the orthopedic surgeon and they say no surgery is even availible. The actual stress crack is at L5 on the left par. Apparently it happened in 07 and healed but not perfectly... I had 1 nerve root epidural and 2 back block epidural shots over the summer and they helped for about 1.5 months. Since I have been abck to the doctor and they say there is nothing else I could do and even said quiting tennis would be something to consider unless I wanted to play through pain. I am trying Physical therapy. I am really open to absolutely anything as I was about 100 in my recruiting class for the nation and now I'm about 500...

Is there anyone on here that has had spondylosis? If so what have you done to keep it under control. The PT that I go to consist of a normal physio trainer, someone who does deep tissue mussle work, and a chiroprator. So far it seems to be helping quite a bit but the real test will come when I play tournys and start training again. Once again all feedback is welcome. Thanks!

jrod
12-02-2009, 05:33 PM
I have no knowledge whatsoever regarding this. However, I do have experience in dealing with the medical establishment. In general, the opinions you are getting are from an extremely small minority of doctors and are most likely not the final word. In addition, there are very likely doctors elsewhere (perhaps teaching hospitals or other centers of excellence) that know more than the medical professionals you've already seen.

My suggestion is to do some research to determine where the medical professionals are that are working on the specific type of problem you are facing. Try and determine also if there is any promising research, experimental treatments, trial studies, etc. where some success has been demonstrated. Try and narrow it down to individual doctors. Then, educate your current attending physicians and get a referral or have your doctor contact the individuals you've identified. The chances are excellent you will learn about alternative treatments, procedures, etc. that might lead to a positive resolution.

I can tell you this is precisely what I did in my wife's case. Five years ago she could not dress herself due to her illness. She was in chronic pain and we tried absolutely everything under the sun to treat her and nothing worked. We eventually found a doctor at one of the teaching hospitals affiliated with a local university who wanted her to enter a trial. We did some additional research on the treament and decided to pass on the trial (double blind so there was a 50% chance she would have received a placebo which was a non-starter for us). Instead, we opted to have her receive the treatment, which involved a series of infusions similar to how they treat certain cancer patients.

The result was nothing short of miraculous. The most remarkable aspect of this treatment is she receives the infusion once per 8-9 months. Traditional treatments required daily injections, massive concoctions of numerous medicines half of which were used to treat negative side effects caused by the other drugs, etc.

Since the first treatment she has managed to resume living a normal life. She exercises 6 days per week now which was unfathomable years ago. Her disease is in check, her quality of life has been restored, her children have their mother back and I have my wife. The treatment has recently been approved by the FDA so it is no longer considered "experimental". Her doctor is now precribing the treatment for all his patients that do not respond well to traditional treatments and the results are equally astounding.

Bottom line is you need to be persistent. Good luck!

ollinger
12-02-2009, 05:52 PM
I didn't follow jrod's post -- what exactly is your wife's illness? It certainly doesn't sound like spondylosis. Spondylosis would probably prompt me to stop playing tennis. It involves deterioration of spinal joints and can lead to some serious problems such as deneneration of nerve roots coming out of your spine. This could lead to serious pain problems and/or degeneration of muscles. What does the doctor think about playing tennis?

jrod
12-03-2009, 03:12 AM
I didn't follow jrod's post -- what exactly is your wife's illness? It certainly doesn't sound like spondylosis. Spondylosis would probably prompt me to stop playing tennis. It involves deterioration of spinal joints and can lead to some serious problems such as deneneration of nerve roots coming out of your spine. This could lead to serious pain problems and/or degeneration of muscles. What does the doctor think about playing tennis?

Sorry ollinger. I deliberately didn't specify the specific desease. It is related to joint deterioration. The point of my post was to encourage the poster to be persistant with the medical community. While his current doctors advice might be sound, I don't believe it is necessarily the only course of action for the OP.

Are you aware of any research or experimental treatments being done on Spondylosis?

El Diablo
12-03-2009, 07:55 AM
Not specifically, but it's the kind of tissue (fairly h-omogeneous, simple structure) that excites people about stem cell and tissue culture research.

Frank Silbermann
12-05-2009, 04:43 PM
i have been to the orthopedic surgeon and they say no surgery is even availible. The actual stress crack is at L5 on the left par. Apparently it happened in 07 and healed but not perfectly...
Is there anyone on here that has had spondylosis? If you have a stress fracture, are you sure it's not spondylolysis, rather than spondylosis?

Orion
12-05-2009, 08:09 PM
Star 5 15, this is the same condition that Andre Aggasi suffers from. I would search the net to find articles pertaining to the condition. I read his book and he stated that the only thing that gave him relief was very painful Cortiisone shots. I believe he said was diagnosed at 15, but the pain didn't get excruciating until the later part of his career.

star 5 15
12-12-2009, 10:26 AM
Thanks everyone for the feedback. I have been seeing a soft tissue therapist, chiropractor, and a trainer. I had a break through where the pain was actually coming from soft tissue ligaments and tendons that connect to muscles in my left lower back. I feel pretty good since its been worked out some. Hopefully 3 or 4 visits and maybe I'll feel 100%. I'm going to try and play some today.

And BTW the ligametns and tendons I'm tlaking about are the ones that go up from the sacrum up to about L5 and L4 and then go across and connect to the Hip. Apparently everything else has been a chain reaction from being out of whack.