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coyfish
12-04-2009, 06:58 PM
Im a high 4.0 to low 4.5 player. I have only been playing for a couple years but I picked it up fast. Anyway I just wan't tips on how to improve. I usually get out and play 2-3 times a week on average. My problem is I play with a lot of the same guys. Im doing my best to find new opponents.

I study all the time (med student) so when I get a chance to go out and hit im looking to have fun instead of grind with the ball machine. Im slowly improving but what should I focus on during practice matches? Playing to win (against friends that I know) doesn't seem like the best way to improve. Or should I focus on consistancy ??? I guess it matters who im playing too. ..

Apologive for a kind of vague question.

Ripper014
12-04-2009, 07:06 PM
Im a high 4.0 to low 4.5 player. I have only been playing for a couple years but I picked it up fast. Anyway I just wan't tips on how to improve. I usually get out and play 2-3 times a week on average. My problem is I play with a lot of the same guys. Im doing my best to find new opponents.

I study all the time (med student) so when I get a chance to go out and hit im looking to have fun instead of grind with the ball machine. Im slowly improving but what should I focus on during practice matches? Playing to win (against friends that I know) doesn't seem like the best way to improve. Or should I focus on consistancy ??? I guess it matters who im playing too. ..

Apologive for a kind of vague question.

If you are trying to improve you don't need to win, what I used to like to do was practice my worst stroke against my opponents. An example would be my volleys... I would serve a 3/4 speed serve and practice volleying. Or if you want to work on your topspin backhand... hit nothing but topspin backhands. But always be aware of exactly what you are trying to achieve, don't just recklessly hit those topspin backhands but concentrate on making each stroke a perfect stroke.

Mick
12-04-2009, 07:38 PM
if you have only played a couple of years and only play 2-3 times a week, you are probably not a 4.0 - 4.5 player.

that is, unless you are really an amazing player because a lot of us have played the game much longer and will never reach the 4.0 - 4.5 level.

i read that to be a 4.0 you have to be able to compete well with the best high school tennis players, and the best high school tennis players are usually pretty good.

Wes_Loves_Dunlop
12-04-2009, 08:00 PM
Well I've been playing seriously for only 1.5 years and I picked the game up very fast. But of course i play 4-6 times a week and about 4 hours each session.
Im a sophomore in hs and I plan to make my varsity team which is one of the best in our league. It is very possible for someone to become a 4.5 in a short amount of time. Of course, i've sort of hit a plateau in my abilities, so im trying to switch to the volkl pb 10 mid to see if it will boost my game up a bit.
Can anyone give me tips?
I play with a two handed backhand and single handed forehand.
I use a medium amount of spin on my forehand, just enough to make sure it wont hit the net, but not too much that it wont have any zing on it. My backhand is usually flat going crosscourt, and not so great on anyhting else. My slices are probably my go-to shot when im playing like crap, because they seem to never fail me. My forehand is my biggest shot and I try to use my forehand to move up to the net to finish the point. My volleys are not amazing, but since most players now are baseline bashers, it comes as a surprise when I volley so that is one advantage (and i also love volleying as well). I am not very fast, but I have good anticipation.

Roy125
12-04-2009, 08:04 PM
if you have only played a couple of years and only play 2-3 times a week, you are probably not a 4.0 - 4.5 player.

that is, unless you are really an amazing player because a lot of us have played the game much longer and will never reach the 4.0 - 4.5 level.

i read that to be a 4.0 you have to be able to compete well with the best high school tennis players, and the best high school tennis players are usually pretty good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

bad_call
12-04-2009, 08:06 PM
Mick - have played coyfish and he is about a 4.0 (at least when he plays me). can't vouch for how long he's played tho. he is a fast and fit player and gets to most balls.

coyfish - suggest u work on one thing at a time and to be specific with what you want to improve. watch upper level players and see what you can glean from their game.

Mick
12-04-2009, 08:14 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

i don't know but i think he's a very good player and is at least a 4.0 and could be higher.

Mick
12-04-2009, 08:22 PM
Mick - have played coyfish and he is about a 4.0 (at least when he plays me). can't vouch for how long he's played tho. he is a fast and fit player and gets to most balls.

coyfish - suggest u work on one thing at a time and to be specific with what you want to improve. watch upper level players and see what you can glean from their game.

coyfish is a gifted player then :)

5263
12-04-2009, 08:27 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

Not way over in that vid.
Hope you are not the other player, lol.

coyfish
12-04-2009, 08:38 PM
Well I've been playing seriously for only 1.5 years and I picked the game up very fast. But of course i play 4-6 times a week and about 4 hours each session.
Im a sophomore in hs and I plan to make my varsity team which is one of the best in our league. It is very possible for someone to become a 4.5 in a short amount of time. Of course, i've sort of hit a plateau in my abilities, so im trying to switch to the volkl pb 10 mid to see if it will boost my game up a bit.
Can anyone give me tips?
I play with a two handed backhand and single handed forehand.
I use a medium amount of spin on my forehand, just enough to make sure it wont hit the net, but not too much that it wont have any zing on it. My backhand is usually flat going crosscourt, and not so great on anyhting else. My slices are probably my go-to shot when im playing like crap, because they seem to never fail me. My forehand is my biggest shot and I try to use my forehand to move up to the net to finish the point. My volleys are not amazing, but since most players now are baseline bashers, it comes as a surprise when I volley so that is one advantage (and i also love volleying as well). I am not very fast, but I have good anticipation.

Not sure why im answering a thread jack in my own thread but whatever. Free bump I guess. Ive played 2.5 Years. I learned in high school for 1 varsity tennis season where I played a TON. Was a 3.5 player. Good strokes but bad consistancy. I lost most my matches because I hit too hard and mentally couldn't keep it together. I had good looking strokes but I had this "superiority" complex and lost to more consistant pushers because I looked down on my opponents.

Tip I can give is work with the ball machine or just ralley with decent friends. Under the 4.0 level (9/10 HS'ers) consistancy wins. Don't worry about looking good. Develop consistant strokes from both sides and don't slice too much. Thats a good way to avoid backhand progression. Slice is the "easier" more consistant shot for most players. Best way to get better at the 3.5 level is just to hit with the ball machine and master your forehand / backhand basics.

Blake0
12-04-2009, 08:41 PM
Roy, he's around 4.5..i think..i didn't watch the whole thing..maybe the first 1-2 mins. Looked like he was beating up on some kid..:)

Here's a couple things my coach told me. This is if you can beat the kids pretty easily (6-2 highest usually). He said he used to play matches against then 0-30 down on serve and return, this way it kept it competitive for both you and your opponent. Another thing he said he used to do was play with only 1 serve..so each point you can only serve 1 ball..not 2. Basically this gets you working on playing your second serve points, and go for the big ones if you really need it. These are basically mentallity drills, which will help you improve a lot in matches because it also helps you with shot selection and stuff.

Another drill is to play first to 21 points. You have to hit every ball to the opponents duece or ad side (preferrably stronger side if they're worse then you), no drop shots, basically deep balls, but if you hit short unintenionally its ok. The catch is that your opponent can move you anywhere on the court and go for any shot he wants to go for. Once you finish, you switch on to hitting to the opposite side.

papatenis
12-04-2009, 08:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

Hey Barnes Center... Lots of good memories...
Those guys are 4.5 going on 6.0 if they play college.

If you have never played college tennis, then you will never be a 4.5 player.
Guys right out of college are at least 6.0-7.0, but as they get older and play less, they become 4.5. But they will never go below 4.5 unless they play into their 70's.

coyfish
12-04-2009, 09:08 PM
coyfish is a gifted player then :)

Thx I picked it up fast. Played 1 season in high school (junior year varsity team) where I took private lessons and played a lot. Was only a 3.5 and played #5 seed but most of that was in my head. The mechanics were there and when I picked it up years later in college I was mentally more prepared and shot up to solid 4.0 with just a little intramural experience.

School is killing me so I don't play much anymore. Not that crisp when I get on the court most of the time which is part of the reason why I started this thread. The kids in that video are around my level. I hit harder on my forehand side then they do but thats just my aggressive style. Some players, (like bad_call :)), handle the pace well while others really can't take it.


The debate for me was playing my strengths / playing to win vs playing to "practice"(aka more consistant). Seems like the consencus is to focus on the latter. Just want to make sure my limited tennis time is both fun and beneficial.

Thanks for the responses

fruitytennis1
12-05-2009, 06:02 AM
i don't know but i think he's a very good player and is at least a 4.0 and could be higher.

Hes a pretty solid 4.0. The guy he is playing is a joke. Not stroke wise he just isnt doing anything to win.

yemenmocha
12-05-2009, 07:12 AM
To the OP- go for a private lesson from 2-3 different pros and see what they say. You may find that a few seemingly minor improvements in your strokes could have a larger impact on the actual results on court. Few of us have flawless strokes. Why not get a professional to look at yours?

psYcon
12-05-2009, 07:18 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?


This is easily 5.0 level of play.

bad_call
12-05-2009, 07:32 AM
last time i hit with coyfish, we worked on his 1HBH depth which he fixed in about 3 strokes. a good teaching pro would help but IMO repetitive drills would solidify as well since he has that stroke. hitting with players that are at or close to his level would be helpful to achieve incremental improvements and increase confidence.

however match play against upper level players requires all cylinders firing and exposes weaknesses in one's game as well as strengths.

LeeD
12-05-2009, 08:18 AM
Top high school players can easily be 5.5's.
My old MissionHigh #1 double partner became CanadaColleges #2 as a freshman. He beat PeanutLouie 7-6, 6-0 for the SanFrancisco HighSchool Champs in '78. Pea WON the CanadianOpen in like '80, a girls tourney for sure, but a 7.0 girl's tournament.
MikeGee, a Lowell student then, played top level B's, or 4.5's thereabouts, always going at least 4 rounds.
TracyHouk went from high school to lower level Women'sPro tournaments, and had little formal training. Assuming "lower level" would be Q's, she was playing 6.0 Womens out of high school. That's close to 5.0 Mens.

LafayetteHitter
12-06-2009, 04:11 PM
Hey Barnes Center... Lots of good memories...
Those guys are 4.5 going on 6.0 if they play college.

If you have never played college tennis, then you will never be a 4.5 player.
Guys right out of college are at least 6.0-7.0, but as they get older and play less, they become 4.5. But they will never go below 4.5 unless they play into their 70's.

These rules are not golden. I have numerous friends locally that are benchmark 4.5's that did not play college tennis. Each of these guys are very good athletes that have trained hard, one did play college baseball.

LeeD
12-06-2009, 04:30 PM
What PapaT preaches is pure hogwash. You don't need to play college tennis to insure 4.5 levels at all. You just need to be able to beat most Div11 players around, hang with most of the the Div1's, and go a few rounds EVERY open and Q tournament.
And as you age... you can easily drop below 4.0. Gain some weight, break legs, collarbones, and arms multiple times, don't ever train, don't play more than once a month, and within 10 years, your skills decline below 4.0.
How can anyone generalize like PapaT and still show credence? There are plenty of exceptions all around.

5263
12-06-2009, 05:05 PM
Im a high 4.0 to low 4.5 player. I have only been playing for a couple years but I picked it up fast. Anyway I just wan't tips on how to improve. I usually get out and play 2-3 times a week on average. My problem is I play with a lot of the same guys. Im doing my best to find new opponents.

I study all the time (med student) so when I get a chance to go out and hit im looking to have fun instead of grind with the ball machine. Im slowly improving but what should I focus on during practice matches? Playing to win (against friends that I know) doesn't seem like the best way to improve. Or should I focus on consistancy ??? I guess it matters who im playing too. ..

Apologive for a kind of vague question.

I bet you rally pretty well, so focus on doing a better job with the mid ct opportunities, especially the ones in the middle lane of the court. This will set you apart from the crowd quicker than any one area of the game (except serving a ton of aces), and is a very do-able thing to work on.

HunterST
12-06-2009, 05:13 PM
if you have only played a couple of years and only play 2-3 times a week, you are probably not a 4.0 - 4.5 player.

that is, unless you are really an amazing player because a lot of us have played the game much longer and will never reach the 4.0 - 4.5 level.

i read that to be a 4.0 you have to be able to compete well with the best high school tennis players, and the best high school tennis players are usually pretty good.

Yeah that doesn't make sense. The best high school players would be D1 bound players. They'd be way over 4.0. A high school player around here also plays juniors and World Team Tennis, he's probably more like a 6.5.

Quikj
12-06-2009, 08:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

Barnes Tennis Center!!! I played a couple of tournaments there. Good times.

He's a 5.0 for sure. I played on the same high school team as Ryan Thacher, and make no mistake about it, Thacher would own, but this kid would put up a fight.

xFullCourtTenniSx
12-07-2009, 12:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozST221nrk4

That's my high school team's best player. Is he really a 4.0-4.5? Or is he way over it?

He's not that great really. :? Back before our team's best got ****ed off by 3 years of bad coaches, our guys would kick his *** no problem. Hell, if our #1 my sophomore year played him, your guy might get sent to the hospital because of the level difference. (No joke, the guy sent someone to the hospital.)

Hell, our top girls could probably take out the slower one, and give the guy in white a good run and possibly beat him too.

Hes a pretty solid 4.0. The guy he is playing is a joke. Not stroke wise he just isnt doing anything to win.

Haha. I thought he was just slow or too lazy to move his feet. I thought the moonballing was SOME attempt at getting a point.

This is easily 5.0 level of play.

Bull$****! lol If that's 5.0+, then D1 players would be 7.0s! They both constantly hit short, don't even use that much topspin, and have rather poor second serves with very little spin. I like the sound off their strings, but what matters is what's being done with the ball, and not much really is getting done. The one in white, literally 50% of his forehands can be attacked very easily. 70% of the ones he hits during his service games are short and sit up nicely for a good pounding to the side. 70% of his backhands are the same thing, only they don't sit up as much. Great to come in behind and volley into the open court. I hit with some guys at Riverside that would tear him apart. One is a lefty who hits hard with a lot of spin (sometimes going into Nadal status on a few and even throwing in some of those gay angles crosscourt), knifes a great slice, and plays a great backhand even though it's rather easy to hit through if you get the first strike. He would destroy that backhand! Another guy would simply out-rally him with deep balls and kill the first short ball he gets. I knew a guy who would easily out-rally both of them back when he played seriously. When he learned the game, his warm up was rallying deep for as long as possible. These guys need to try that.

If they focused on playing deep more often, they would at least be solid 4.5s, but a majority of their strokes land around the service line and sit up. Could be the camera angle, but bottom line - they're hitting too many too short.

In our league (when I played), we had 2 schools where EVERY player would dominate him... Not even joking. That's how scary these guys were. One of them was #5 in 16s division in So Cal, and last I checked (close to a year ago) he was #25 in the 18s division. That essentially makes him a solid 6.0. There are some other schools pretty close by that have pretty much the same kinds of players. 4.0-4.5 is like you're average high school varsity player. The few top players of a few schools are 5.0-5.5. Then there are the few lucky schools to have those 6.0 players. Then there are those REALLY lucky schools to be loaded with 5.0-5.5 players as their norm, and the 6.0 players to top it off! Then again, that might just be in So Cal... If you look around enough, you'll see the big guns. Or maybe it's just the part of So Cal I live in? Either way... Some scary players around here.

I believe that you can usually tell the level of players by the distance behind the baseline they both rally from (assuming they aren't pushing and lobbing all day and are in neutral rally positions). Right on the baseline can be 3.5 to 4.5. Around 2-4 feet back is around a strong 4.5 to a 5.5. Around 5 feet and beyond is strong 5.5 and up.

You can also tell by the height over the net and the height of contact made from their average rally distance behind the baseline. So your general strong 5.0-weak 5.5 player should be around 3 feet behind the baseline and making contact with a ball around low chest height with 3 feet of margin over the net. And your general 6.0 player hits from 5-7 feet behind the baseline while making contact around chest height with net clearance of around 4 feet. 4.0s make contact around waist to upper abdominal height from the baseline with their shots going around 2 feet over the net. 4.0 shots will land around a few feet past the service line, the 5.5 will hit them midway (or a little past) the center of no man's land, and the 6.0 will hit them within 5 feet of the baseline. This is assuming they're playing people of relatively even skill level of course. A 6.0 against a 3.5 will be 5 feet inside the baseline. The reason I use general rally position as a rough measurement of the skills of two closely matched players is simple: the better they are, the more pace and depth they'll consistently hit with, which means that they HAVE to back up in order to consistently hit solid shots comfortably. I remember playing a strong 5.0, and his returns were so deep that I really couldn't do anything staying behind the baseline, so I had to come in behind my serves. Not only that, they were consistently hard and deep. Around that time, I was a 4.0 and had a big, well placed kicker. He was a little short so I could get it over his head and wide, but he could still pull it where he wanted. The guys in the video are nothing close to that, so they aren't even in the 5.0 range.

These guys play around the baseline, but catch the ball around mid abdominal to chest height. So at best they're solid 4.5s.

xFullCourtTenniSx
12-07-2009, 12:42 AM
Yeah that doesn't make sense. The best high school players would be D1 bound players. They'd be way over 4.0. A high school player around here also plays juniors and World Team Tennis, he's probably more like a 6.5.

If he plays WTT, he shouldn't even be in school fool! That's 7.0 stuff!

fuzz nation
12-07-2009, 07:18 AM
It's tricky to say exactly where the better player in that video rates because the other guy isn't at his level. It actually looks to me like the hitting partner is feeding the featured guy some shorter sitters that he can put away. Very helpful if you want to make a highlight reel, but not great for determining a rating.

As a player solidifies into the 4.0 ranks and starts progressing toward a 4.5 level, the best way to describe that evolution is that the player becomes a bit more competent at everything. While that's also the case when improving from 3.5 to 4.0, I believe that the 4.0 will also have more useful shots to employ on the court than the 3.5. One example might be an aggressive backhand return for the 4.0 which was only a neutral blocked return as a 3.5.

The 4.5 player has maybe a little more pace and consistency than the 4.0, but their overall game is more dependable, even when defensive. One of the telling things in a 4.5 player's game is that this hitter is much less likely to get rattled and panic under fire. While a 4.0 player can take advantage of an opening and press an opponent, a 4.5 player can also get back to a neutral footing in a point after being defensive. In this video, the guy in the white shirt isn't being pressed, so there's no telling if he has any ability beyond a dependable 4.0 level. He's obviously a competent player, but his footwork gets rather passive in some of this footage. He might have some real trouble hanging in against some extra pace.

tennis_pr0
12-07-2009, 07:41 AM
Coyfish, your question is a great question because as you said, when you go out and play the same people and do the same things, you're just staying at the same level instead of improving. In my opinion, there is only one way to improve, and that is to look at the individual parts of your game and decide what is weak and what is strong.

For example, you play a match against an opponent and you realize that you hit about 15 forehand winners but only 2 backhand winners. Then you ask yourself why. They you realize that you were slicing too many balls, and that the only way for you to hit more winners off that backhand is to be more aggressive with it. Now, for the next oo lets say three weeks, you give yourself one objective and one objective only, and that is just to be more aggressive with the backhand.

Once you feel you have improved your backhand, they you do the same thing over again. You take just one part of your game you feel is a bit weaker than the rest of your game, and you just work on that and only that.

In a nutshell, the only way to really improve and notice the improvement is when you work on individual things. If you just go out and "hit" and do the same things, you will never really improve. It's like school, that harder you study the smarter you will be. Study your game, figure out what is weak, and just focus on those aspects of your game. This is what brings players to the next level, when they realize what is weak and make an effort to improve those weak areas.

Evan

teppeiahn1
12-07-2009, 12:17 PM
Coyfish, your question is a great question because as you said, when you go out and play the same people and do the same things, you're just staying at the same level instead of improving. In my opinion, there is only one way to improve, and that is to look at the individual parts of your game and decide what is weak and what is strong.

For example, you play a match against an opponent and you realize that you hit about 15 forehand winners but only 2 backhand winners. Then you ask yourself why. They you realize that you were slicing too many balls, and that the only way for you to hit more winners off that backhand is to be more aggressive with it. Now, for the next oo lets say three weeks, you give yourself one objective and one objective only, and that is just to be more aggressive with the backhand.

Once you feel you have improved your backhand, they you do the same thing over again. You take just one part of your game you feel is a bit weaker than the rest of your game, and you just work on that and only that.

In a nutshell, the only way to really improve and notice the improvement is when you work on individual things. If you just go out and "hit" and do the same things, you will never really improve. It's like school, that harder you study the smarter you will be. Study your game, figure out what is weak, and just focus on those aspects of your game. This is what brings players to the next level, when they realize what is weak and make an effort to improve those weak areas.

Evan

Very true. in orderto get better, you have to train and improve what you lack.
Best thing is to get a coach.

xFullCourtTenniSx
12-07-2009, 06:12 PM
Coyfish, your question is a great question because as you said, when you go out and play the same people and do the same things, you're just staying at the same level instead of improving. In my opinion, there is only one way to improve, and that is to look at the individual parts of your game and decide what is weak and what is strong.

For example, you play a match against an opponent and you realize that you hit about 15 forehand winners but only 2 backhand winners. Then you ask yourself why. They you realize that you were slicing too many balls, and that the only way for you to hit more winners off that backhand is to be more aggressive with it. Now, for the next oo lets say three weeks, you give yourself one objective and one objective only, and that is just to be more aggressive with the backhand.

Once you feel you have improved your backhand, they you do the same thing over again. You take just one part of your game you feel is a bit weaker than the rest of your game, and you just work on that and only that.

In a nutshell, the only way to really improve and notice the improvement is when you work on individual things. If you just go out and "hit" and do the same things, you will never really improve. It's like school, that harder you study the smarter you will be. Study your game, figure out what is weak, and just focus on those aspects of your game. This is what brings players to the next level, when they realize what is weak and make an effort to improve those weak areas.

Evan

Learning the game, this is EXACTLY what I did. I would take the most glaring weakness (or inability) in my game and work on it until it became a solid shot.

At first, it was the backhand. I kept hitting them until I developed a feel for the ball. I learned to hit both topspin and slice backhands. But slice was easier and more consistent for me, so I kept with that and developed the feel to consistently float them deep (like drop them on the baseline deep). As my wrist and confidence grew, it turned into a low knifing slice. Throughout the whole time, whenever people drilled me in warmups, I would hit topspin backhands; so I could do both, but the slice was more consistent and I had more confidence in it. But I wanted to hit an aggressive topspin backhand, so anytime in a match, I would force myself to hit topspin on every backhand. Though, at that point of my game, people weren't great at hitting corners, so I only hit 1-3 backhands a game. Eventually it got to the point where I could use it without fear.

The next glaring weakness, my inability to pound the ball and hit approach shot winners. I changed my grip and focused on my ability to anticipate the short balls early so I could prepare early. I was running through a lot of them, but I hit them consistently and could force errors. It also helped me naturally develop the carioca step on the backhand.

Then there was my response to service returns. They generally came too short to hit approach shots from, so I decided to learn to volley as well and became a serve and volleyer. I practiced serving and following them to the net as often as possible, and fine tuned my volleys as needed.

After that, it really became adding specific shots to my game, like the drop shot, the running forehand, the squash shot (which I just rely on natural gut to pull it off for me), a reliable overhead, the backhand overhead, the half volley. Then it was footwork.

Now, I'm going back to practicing at the net, because at one point I got bored of how fast serving and volleying went through a set, and decided to work on my groundstroke game. I've gotten away with not practicing volleys for a long time, as overall I've been able to keep a competent net game and finish off most volleys and place them where I want. But my forehand volley decayed to the point where I might as well not even touch the ball if I want a shot at the point. I worked on that, and it's getting better again. And forcing both me and my hitting partner to stay back and work on groundstrokes has also decayed my ability to hit passing shots off both sides, so I will probably have to work on that next. I can still hit them, just not at the same level as I did before. But you can easily argue that I'm at a much higher level of play not, so the passing shots I hit before were much easier to pull off then than now.

And throughout the whole time, I'm constantly seeking to improve my serve and forehand, my two biggest weapons. I'll generally experiment with a few things and stick with whatever works.

It's not just a matter of what's weak and what's strong. It's also what can make you a better player and hurt your opponent? Bottom line, we all have to learn to hit the ball deep, consistently, and with confidence; but aside from that what can we improve? Usually it's where ever your opponent can squeeze out more points than they should or something that might not be satisfactory. I always aim for perfection, and even though I can't get there, at least I'll always be looking to improve because there'll be a part of me saying "you can do better". The problem with owning so many shots is that you have to practice all of them, which is a bit overwhelming sometimes... Even something you think feels so natural will eventually decay to levels way below normal. (Unless you're Sampras.)

coyfish
12-07-2009, 07:02 PM
Thanks for those responses guys. Im a natural soccer player. Its just in my brain. Tennis on the other hand is a different story. IF I don't play for a week it takes me a while to get back into it. Takes me a good 2 sessions to "regroup" and play decent again. Feels funny just to hold the racket sometimes. As I mentioned I only get out 1-2 times a week so I often get overwhelmed / frustrated with things not clicking that I know should.

My game is also pretty versatile. I try to play like fed. Mix up my shots with slices, heavy topspin high arching, flat forehands, and finish with my big forehand. Difficult to execute consistantly without practice.

Anyway ill take your advice and try and focus on particular aspects of my game. 1 step at a time. Unfortunately I think im a little delusional. I just don't have the time to invest so i shouldn't fool myself into thinking I should be improving. Tennis is one of the sports (like golf) that requires constant practice / work.

Sometimes you just have to take a step back and just appreciate what you have. That doesn't mean im going to stop working at it though!

HunterST
12-09-2009, 03:14 PM
If he plays WTT, he shouldn't even be in school fool! That's 7.0 stuff!

Yeeah okay, not sure why you called me a fool. He's in school and he's in WTT so I guess you're the fool?

Moz
12-09-2009, 03:23 PM
.

After that, it really became adding specific shots to my game, like the drop shot, the running forehand, the squash shot (which I just rely on natural gut to pull it off for me), a reliable overhead, the backhand overhead, the half volley. Then it was footwork.



That's some bizarre prioritisation. Footwork after drop shots and squash shots? What were you thinking?