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View Full Version : From 11.5 oz to 12.5 oz racquet in 2 weeks


lwto
12-05-2009, 12:58 AM
Hi, I'm a 50 year old player that hits with power, I've been using a Wilson Kblade 98 at 11.5 ozs. I've tried to use a heavier racquet but have not been successful as my arm just tires so easily and not being the best of shape I just get fatigued.

I have so wanted to play with a heavier racquet for all its benifits so I started a new and pretty easy training regime.

Simply I started to swing 10 pound barbells as though it were a racquet, doing forehands, backhands, volleys and serves. It was very tough at first, for the first few days, but after that it became pretty easy. I can swing 10 lb barbells at 60 reps now for each motion.

It has done tremendous for my arm strength, endurance and racquet head speed. I really wish I had done this before, though I do notice my right side getting alot stronger than my left, so I've been including my left side also as of late.

I've been able to add alot of weight to my racquet, 1 ounce since I started. In fact my racquet right now is 12.5, 4 points head light. The fact that it is only 4 points head light is very significant in that I have so much head weight into the ball now that, the ball is just crushed. Its quite remarkable actually how much and how heavy the ball is. As an experiment to see how heavy it would be at about 8 points head light, the racquet would be well over 13 ounces.

I would say it helped out the serve and overheads the most. they are heavy heavy shots. The backhand is very solid and so is the volley's. My strongest part of my game was my fore hand and now its just a ripper.

Anyway, I kinda revealed to my friends what I've been doing and now, everyone is doing it. It improves the game that much.

Its a easy way to help develop your strength and improve your game.

You should try it see what ya think, I can't be any happier with the results.

chess9
12-05-2009, 03:56 AM
I play with a 13 oz racquet, so I'm on board with this idea. The downside is that people who hit with a heavy vertical stroke component are not going to be as happy with a heavy racquet. Those who hit a bit flatter, such as me, will be fine.

The strength needed to hit a 13 oz racquet is not much more than an 11 oz racquet, particularly if you have good technique, including keeping your non-dominant hand on the frame about 90% of the time, something most players below about 6.0 don't do. So, when people say they tire out hitting a 13 oz racquet, they are really saying "I don't keep both hands on the racquet 90% of the time." Or, they are saying "I am weak as an 8 year old girl." :) j/k But, it's true that modern man is extremely weak by comparison to his Neanderthal forebears, and even people 100 years ago. Modern life is soft for most.

-Robert

lwto
12-05-2009, 10:41 AM
I play with a 13 oz racquet, so I'm on board with this idea. The downside is that people who hit with a heavy vertical stroke component are not going to be as happy with a heavy racquet. Those who hit a bit flatter, such as me, will be fine.

The strength needed to hit a 13 oz racquet is not much more than an 11 oz racquet, particularly if you have good technique, including keeping your non-dominant hand on the frame about 90% of the time, something most players below about 6.0 don't do. So, when people say they tire out hitting a 13 oz racquet, they are really saying "I don't keep both hands on the racquet 90% of the time." Or, they are saying "I am weak as an 8 year old girl." :) j/k But, it's true that modern man is extremely weak by comparison to his Neanderthal forebears, and even people 100 years ago. Modern life is soft for most.

-Robert

When I release I don't think I have my non-dominant hand on my racquet 100% of the time.

I would'nt have been as ecstatic about this had it only suited the one type of play.. that said I do have several different forehands I rely on, one is being a very flat shot that I set up with what you call a heavy verticle stroke, or lots of heavy topspin. I can flip balls from anywhere on the court, and If I couldn't do that I wouldn't be so happy with this, but I can rush the net and flip a ball most anywhere better so than with my lighter racquet, since the ball comes out alittle heavier.


Have you ever tried playing with your non-dominant hand?
If so you know that it really isn't the coordination that is the problem, but its the strength and stamina to consistently maintain a proper swing.

Never the less, it works for me, it gives me more strength, and allows me to have a heavier swing speed.

yemenmocha
12-05-2009, 12:53 PM
Sacrifice much in maneuverability at net? Play high level doubles?

larry10s
12-05-2009, 01:38 PM
i would think the 4 points hl balance point would not be good for doubles. i went from 12.1 oz 8 points headlight to 12.7 oz 11 points hl and cant tell the difference in maneuverability actually iy feels whippier!!! i play alot of doubles no problem with reflex volleys

lwto
12-05-2009, 02:20 PM
Sacrifice much in maneuverability at net? Play high level doubles?

I was very worried about that, but I found out several things. Reflex volly's did not appear to degrade, in fact just the opposite, I have become faster and the volly's that I hit, are helped tremendously by the weight of the racquet. So what happens I find is that incoming vollys and thats including blocked reflex volly's are bounding off my racquet alot quicker, faster than my opponent can reflex too.

I play about a 4.5 doubles.

In fact today I was talking to a friend who played in Wimbledon during the days of Stan Smith and Arthur Ashe. He was a S/V player and still despite his hobbled knees and bad back can volly with anyone. Well he was telling me his racquet is 14 ounces, head heavy. He equates his success to strengthening his arms and wrists when he was young.

chess9
12-05-2009, 04:20 PM
When I release I don't think I have my non-dominant hand on my racquet 100% of the time.

I would'nt have been as ecstatic about this had it only suited the one type of play.. that said I do have several different forehands I rely on, one is being a very flat shot that I set up with what you call a heavy verticle stroke, or lots of heavy topspin. I can flip balls from anywhere on the court, and If I couldn't do that I wouldn't be so happy with this, but I can rush the net and flip a ball most anywhere better so than with my lighter racquet, since the ball comes out alittle heavier.


Have you ever tried playing with your non-dominant hand?
If so you know that it really isn't the coordination that is the problem, but its the strength and stamina to consistently maintain a proper swing.

Never the less, it works for me, it gives me more strength, and allows me to have a heavier swing speed.

I can play a bit left handed, as I was born a lefty and was converted to a righty as a child. Coordination is the major problem for me. I've lifted weights my whole life, so I have bilateral strength, though I couldn't say it's perfectly equal. Being ambi may give me a slight advantage on this 'test'.

No, don't keep your non-dominant hand on the racquet while swinging foreward, though a few guys do! LOL! But, watch the better tennis players' use of the non-dominant hand and arm. A lot of lower ranked amateurs never put both hands on the racquet. Sometimes I think their non-dom. arm has polio!

Yes, I can 'flip' a ball too, but a lot of guys prefer the lighter racquets for spin generation. That's fine, IMHO.

-Robert

chess9
12-05-2009, 04:21 PM
i would think the 4 points hl balance point would not be good for doubles. i went from 12.1 oz 8 points headlight to 12.7 oz 11 points hl and cant tell the difference in maneuverability actually iy feels whippier!!! i play alot of doubles no problem with reflex volleys

Ditto!

-Robert

chess9
12-05-2009, 04:24 PM
I was very worried about that, but I found out several things. Reflex volly's did not appear to degrade, in fact just the opposite, I have become faster and the volly's that I hit, are helped tremendously by the weight of the racquet. So what happens I find is that incoming vollys and thats including blocked reflex volly's are bounding off my racquet alot quicker, faster than my opponent can reflex too.

I play about a 4.5 doubles.

In fact today I was talking to a friend who played in Wimbledon during the days of Stan Smith and Arthur Ashe. He was a S/V player and still despite his hobbled knees and bad back can volly with anyone. Well he was telling me his racquet is 14 ounces, head heavy. He equates his success to strengthening his arms and wrists when he was young.

My racquets in high school and college were about 15 oz, which may be why I prefer the heavier sticks. But, still I think this is just a matter of preference, and not so much about whether one person or the other can handle a heavy racquet. I've been beaten like a drum by guys with 11 oz sticks.

-Robert

lwto
12-05-2009, 05:04 PM
My racquets in high school and college were about 15 oz, which may be why I prefer the heavier sticks. But, still I think this is just a matter of preference, and not so much about whether one person or the other can handle a heavy racquet. I've been beaten like a drum by guys with 11 oz sticks.

-Robert

That is true, in fact alot of professionals I notice use a very light racquet now. I just like the heavy balls a heavier racquet produces, not to mention the "plow through" capabilities a heavier racquet instills.

My whole point is not whether or not one is comfortable with a heavy or light racquet, but that with the training, I have been able to go to a heavier racquet with marked improvements.

One thing I do notice is that the torque of a heavier racquet even the 1 ounce, is very noticeable around my core. Though, that could be the swing weight of using a heavier head which I'm suspecting is the case.

Anyway, I still think its a good idea, whether your looking to goto a heavier racquet or not. In the most general sense, it will give you a more solid shot whether you are using a light racquet or a heavy racquet.

movdqa
12-05-2009, 05:21 PM
They may use lighter racquets stock but many do lead them up.

On volleys, yes, you can just stick the racquet out and get a good shot without having to take a swing at it so the added weight can mean a shorter swing or no swing in many cases.

Improved fitness provides so many benefits. The guy that I play singles with regularly hasn't taken a set from me in a few months. I increased my fitness level and he hasn't found a way to crack that with technique improvements. We usually go back and forth as to who is winning but I think that he will have to make a major improvement to get back to winning.

mikeler
12-05-2009, 06:27 PM
I'm either ambidextrous or a lefty naturally, but of course this is a right handed world so I do everything with that arm. If my right elbow does not heal soon, I'm just going to start playing tennis left handed. I'm tired of the pain.

Ken Honecker
12-06-2009, 02:32 AM
I've always used a 12+ oz stick and so I find myself shaking my head when people talk about how terribly heavy they are. If an oz or two made any difference think how much stronger the average persons left arm would be from carting that heavy watch around 14 hours a day. Gals would be even more lopsided because of that huge diamond they are sporting. LOL

I've always been able to play fairly well left handed except I don't think my serve would be anything to brag about.

raiden031
12-06-2009, 03:23 AM
People who have trouble with heavier racquets are probably just arming the ball.

chess9
12-06-2009, 04:17 AM
I'm either ambidextrous or a lefty naturally, but of course this is a right handed world so I do everything with that arm. If my right elbow does not heal soon, I'm just going to start playing tennis left handed. I'm tired of the pain.

I was actually hitting some lefty balls against the wall and with a friend for a few days when I was afraid my GE wouldn't heal. I've heard some anecdotal comments that learning to play with both hands was good for one's game. So, I think I'm going to start hitting some every time I warm up with my left arm so I'm prepared for the next injury. :)

-Robert

chess9
12-06-2009, 04:20 AM
I've always used a 12+ oz stick and so I find myself shaking my head when people talk about how terribly heavy they are. If an oz or two made any difference think how much stronger the average persons left arm would be from carting that heavy watch around 14 hours a day. Gals would be even more lopsided because of that huge diamond they are sporting. LOL

I've always been able to play fairly well left handed except I don't think my serve would be anything to brag about.

Yup. Tiger's wife is going to have a huge left arm by this time next year. ;)

-Robert

chess9
12-06-2009, 04:21 AM
People who have trouble with heavier racquets are probably just arming the ball.

Yes, agreed. No unit turn, no legs, back, etc.

-Robert

mikeler
12-06-2009, 06:20 AM
I was actually hitting some lefty balls against the wall and with a friend for a few days when I was afraid my GE wouldn't heal. I've heard some anecdotal comments that learning to play with both hands was good for one's game. So, I think I'm going to start hitting some every time I warm up with my left arm so I'm prepared for the next injury. :)

-Robert


I used to hit lefty with my high school team. May have to go back to it again for a little while.

movdqa
12-06-2009, 06:27 AM
I had a friend who did that. It was awful playing against him while he was playing lefty because the ball could go into the net, off the side of the court, out or sometimes in. It's not something that's good to inflict on other people unless you're as good with the other hand as you are with your dominant hand.

mikeler
12-06-2009, 06:40 AM
I had a friend who did that. It was awful playing against him while he was playing lefty because the ball could go into the net, off the side of the court, out or sometimes in. It's not something that's good to inflict on other people unless you're as good with the other hand as you are with your dominant hand.


I'd hit with a ball machine a few times before getting out there with a live person. Plus, I'd play somebody a few notches down on the NTRP level.

movdqa
12-06-2009, 07:14 AM
This guy did do that. He hit in racquetball courts several times per week. He also developed a lefty serve. It was effective in that you fell asleep waiting for it because it didn't go in most of the time. Fortunately he changed racquets and got some rest and he's back to playing at full strength. I never see him going back to the lefty strokes.

mikeler
12-06-2009, 07:55 AM
The serve is the toughest part followed by the backhand.

86golf
12-06-2009, 04:08 PM
My favorite stick is a botched silicon job where the silicon got up into the throat. I added 30 grams and 90% of it is in the throat rather than the handle. I love the feel. While it is pretty even balanced, it must have a swing weight of about 350+. Total weight is 346g. It really helps me with my timing and keep my non-dominant hand during the take back.

And if your curious, I used compressed air to move the silicon. I was trying to get it to the top of the grip and I succeeded and then some.:?

lwto
12-06-2009, 04:22 PM
No , hitting off hand for me, isn't that hard, what is difficult and I challenge anyone to try it.. is to hit off hand continually. once, twice, three times, no problem but go ahead and practice, with it for a week and then come back.


I don't arm balls, for several reasons.. Inconsistancy, lack of power and the injury one develops because they arm the ball. I've never had a shoulder, or arm problems from tennis and I hit the ball pretty hard.
I don't know and can't speak for you all, but I know that for me and alot of the players I play with, going up in weight is very difficult to do. I play mostly with 4.5 players. OK OK, Sure we can swing a heavier racquet, but not consistently, its somthing that you have to work up to. Fact is, I can tell on my racquet weighting difference's.. I put a gram of weight on and you know I can feel it.

I don't know, maybe its my age, I don't have a lot to compare as I never worried about weight when I was younger.. but now, wow, its very noticable.

movdqa
12-06-2009, 04:25 PM
I can feel a gram too. I see people that throw on 10 or 15 grams and I think that's a good recipe for arm problems. A gram or two at 3/9 can make a huge difference in the serve. I recommend starting with a little and adding to it over time if that's the goal.

86golf
12-06-2009, 05:08 PM
I can feel a gram too. I see people that throw on 10 or 15 grams and I think that's a good recipe for arm problems. A gram or two at 3/9 can make a huge difference in the serve. I recommend starting with a little and adding to it over time if that's the goal.

My boogers weigh more than a gram or two. There is no way any player can feel a single gram or two for that matter. There was an article in Tennis magazine 2 years ago regarding Nadal. Uncle Tony finally decided to weigh his racquets one day and they varied by 8 grams. Nadal never new that racquets could vary in weight. Uncle Tony told him not to customize them as those were simple challenges that he needed to be prepared for.

movdqa
12-06-2009, 05:20 PM
> There is no way any player can feel a single gram or two
> for that matter.

That's rubbish. I added two grams to my PDR and could feel the difference on the serve. Less spin, more forward motion.

lwto
12-06-2009, 05:30 PM
My boogers weigh more than a gram or two. There is no way any player can feel a single gram or two for that matter. There was an article in Tennis magazine 2 years ago regarding Nadal. Uncle Tony finally decided to weigh his racquets one day and they varied by 8 grams. Nadal never new that racquets could vary in weight. Uncle Tony told him not to customize them as those were simple challenges that he needed to be prepared for.

What ever, I know I can take a small piece of the 1/4 inch lead.. lets say an inch for argument, and can feel the difference. True, maybe not statically, but on the swing, I can feel it very definitely. It doesnt take anything to change the feeling on your racquet.

JackB1
12-09-2009, 11:05 AM
Wonder why they don't make a training device for tennis that is basically a racquet handle with a weight on the end. They have heavy weighted swingers for baseball, golf...why not tennis? Either that ot take an old racquet and rigure out a way to attach some weight to it. You could get some of that heavier gold lead tape and go all the way around the hoop and then you would have a training racquet you could actually play with.

movdqa
12-09-2009, 11:17 AM
You can do a lot of the tennis motions with a good pulley weight training system. There's one at my local gym. Unfortunately it's quite popular.

mike53
12-09-2009, 11:22 AM
Wonder why they don't make a training device for tennis that is basically a racquet handle with a weight on the end. They have heavy weighted swingers for baseball, golf...why not tennis? Either that ot take an old racquet and rigure out a way to attach some weight to it. You could get some of that heavier gold lead tape and go all the way around the hoop and then you would have a training racquet you could actually play with.

Someone on an older thread suggested swinging your racquet with a head cover and a towel or two stuffed inside the cover for ballast. Also, the theraband company makes a handle type device for about $10 that you can hold like a racquet handle while attached to one of their elastic tube/ribbon products and it lets you practice a loaded swing.

JackB1
12-09-2009, 01:31 PM
Someone on an older thread suggested swinging your racquet with a head cover and a towel or two stuffed inside the cover for ballast. Also, the theraband company makes a handle type device for about $10 that you can hold like a racquet handle while attached to one of their elastic tube/ribbon products and it lets you practice a loaded swing.

I dont think that gives you the same feeling as swinging a heavy, weighted racquet.

lwto
12-09-2009, 04:20 PM
Wonder why they don't make a training device for tennis that is basically a racquet handle with a weight on the end. They have heavy weighted swingers for baseball, golf...why not tennis? Either that ot take an old racquet and rigure out a way to attach some weight to it. You could get some of that heavier gold lead tape and go all the way around the hoop and then you would have a training racquet you could actually play with.

I did that actually, I got this lead from the fishing dept., Its abouty 3/8 inch in diameter and comes in a length about 5 feet, well I wrapped it around my racquet to test.

several things about this I found out.

1:) To heavy and it became very difficult to swing, it would hurt your wrist if it was to head heavy.

2:) It really messed up the timing on your shots, it did mine, took about 30 minutes to normalize.

3:) I thought it did a very good job of increasing your swing speed, but not necessarily strengthening your arms and shoulders.

I still think using a barbell, is a good way to go. If nothing else it strengthen's your arms and shoulder, plus when you hit the ball, you feel solid and the ball just bolts off your racquet.