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View Full Version : Surgery for Tennis Elbow/Golfer's Elbow w/BAD results?


yemenmocha
12-05-2009, 04:24 PM
Given that this is a tennis forum, I would find it odd if someone has bad results with surgery and then gives up tennis, yet still lurks around on a tennis forum. So I'm disposed to think the opinions may be statistically skewed towards hearing about good results, because those people are still playing & enjoying tennis.

Has anyone heard or know of other people who have bad results with surgery? Did surgery make it worse? Permanently cannot play tennis?

Just want to hear a balanced set of replies on what people know about resorting to surgery for TE/GE. :cry:

mikeler
12-05-2009, 05:57 PM
Given that this is a tennis forum, I would find it odd if someone has bad results with surgery and then gives up tennis, yet still lurks around on a tennis forum. So I'm disposed to think the opinions may be statistically skewed towards hearing about good results, because those people are still playing & enjoying tennis.

Has anyone heard or know of other people who have bad results with surgery? Did surgery make it worse? Permanently cannot play tennis?

Just want to hear a balanced set of replies on what people know about resorting to surgery for TE/GE. :cry:


I have been to 8 chiropractor visits the last 3 weeks for ultrasound and electrostimulation therapy for Golfer's Elbow and Triceps Tendinitis. I had to go 5 days without treatment during Thanksgiving and my elbow barely got better, so it does work well.

My chiropractor has solved many elbow issues for a number of players at our club with the same methods. She has heard many bad stories about surgery (I hope this is her medical opinion). My 2 cents...try some rest and physical therapy first. This is the first time I have not played for 3 weeks since Roddick won the US Open.

mikeler
12-05-2009, 06:02 PM
Do you have both GE and TE?

yemenmocha
12-05-2009, 08:28 PM
Do you have both GE and TE?

No, just GE.

A friend has TE worse than my GE and is seeking surgery. I've had better results than he has with more conservative treatment so I see his motivation for surgery.

chess9
12-06-2009, 04:59 AM
Given that this is a tennis forum, I would find it odd if someone has bad results with surgery and then gives up tennis, yet still lurks around on a tennis forum. So I'm disposed to think the opinions may be statistically skewed towards hearing about good results, because those people are still playing & enjoying tennis.

Has anyone heard or know of other people who have bad results with surgery? Did surgery make it worse? Permanently cannot play tennis?

Just want to hear a balanced set of replies on what people know about resorting to surgery for TE/GE. :cry:

I hate to pat orthopedic surgeons on the back, but I think they are getting better. ;)

A friend of mine had hip replacement surgery and he is doing fabulously well. I can't believe how strong his movements are. He's a smaller guy, so maybe that's part of it, but his result is incredible considering how bad his hip was. He's also about 45, so his youth helps. I would think the younger you are the more likely you'd be to have good results.

Frankly, if it were me, I would NOT have surgery until I'd spent at least 6 months resting or had incontrovertible diagnostic evidence that rest would not help.

-Robert

86golf
12-06-2009, 05:09 AM
sister-n-law is a nurse and she told me never to consider surgery for my GE. It has failed more often than successful. I've never considered it since mine seems to be more of a chronic condition, but I guess if you can't play it is something to consider.

There is just too much contradiction out there on TE/GE. Rest vs. therapy; ice vs. heat; ultrasound vs. laser;

If I could turn back time, at the onset, I would have stopped tennis for a week and followed the NSAID therapy for 6 days.

yemenmocha
12-06-2009, 05:46 AM
sister-n-law is a nurse and she told me never to consider surgery for my GE. It has failed more often than successful. I've never considered it since mine seems to be more of a chronic condition, but I guess if you can't play it is something to consider.

There is just too much contradiction out there on TE/GE. Rest vs. therapy; ice vs. heat; ultrasound vs. laser;

If I could turn back time, at the onset, I would have stopped tennis for a week and followed the NSAID therapy for 6 days.

Me too.

The best fix for GE is to not get it in the first place.

mikeler
12-06-2009, 06:16 AM
Me too.

The best fix for GE is to not get it in the first place.


Mine started out as triceps tendinitis. I think I must have altered my strokes because the GE came 9 months after that. Hit for the first time in 3 weeks today and the results were not that great. Looks like I'm on the sidelines for another month :(

larry10s
12-06-2009, 02:18 PM
first when all the usuals failed id look into platelet rich plasma therapy (actually id push this to higher up on therapy options) secondly if you already cant play tennis and all else has failed and you try surgery and it doesnt work you're not worse off you still cant play:shock:. if it works then happy camper. :) usually surgery is a decision when all else fails and you are willing to roll the dice one more time. i havent done a search but someone should be able to provide a link to the statistics of success /failure with surgery

Moz
12-07-2009, 12:11 AM
I asked my hand surgeon about GE surgery and although he stressed he wasn't an expert he did say that the experts were heavily split about even doing the procedure.

A cautionary tale about available statistics. The consultant who did my GE cortisone said that PRP therapy was successful in 80% of TE cases. However, when pushed he admitted that 80% of his patients didn't come back afterwards - which to me is not necessarily indicative of success.

If they do the same with surgery figures (when there may be no point coming back because it was last resort) I would tread warily. The figures may also include people looking for relief who aren't even tennis players who, I would guess, are less likely to have it return.