PDA

View Full Version : Agressive Forehand Problems


BSTAFF
12-05-2009, 05:38 PM
Hi, recently I have been having issues with my aggressive forehand. This is usually one of my best shots. What I mean by aggressive is putting a little more pace on the ball and trying to the opponent around the court. Now when I try to hit this shot lately almost all of my shots have been going into the net. I feel like I'm swinging the same as usual and it also feels the same. I just don't know how to fix this. Any tips or ideas on how to get it back to normal?
Thanks

BSTAFF
12-05-2009, 05:40 PM
Sorry, I meant "trying to move the opponent around the court." Let me know if I need to give any more info

ayuname
12-05-2009, 07:30 PM
Same problem here with me too. I think I'm just being lazy or hitting it too low.

5263
12-05-2009, 07:48 PM
Hi, recently I have been having issues with my aggressive forehand. This is usually one of my best shots. What I mean by aggressive is putting a little more pace on the ball and trying to the opponent around the court. Now when I try to hit this shot lately almost all of my shots have been going into the net. I feel like I'm swinging the same as usual and it also feels the same. I just don't know how to fix this. Any tips or ideas on how to get it back to normal?
Thanks

Most likely with the harder ball you feel you must hit closer to net and this leads to too many in the net. If you can learn to hit harder, with more spin, and higher net clearance, this should be less of a problem.

Blake0
12-05-2009, 08:05 PM
This is a problem i've been facing a lot recently too, although its when i'm trying to rip a winner, it like always hits the white part of the tape and falls back down on my side of the court, very annoying..

LeeD
12-06-2009, 08:29 AM
When you try extra hard to really put the pace on the ball, try using more legs, hips, and trunk, and NOT MORE shoulder and arms. Shoulder and arm might pronate the ball into the net. Legs give lift. Hips and trunk allow the turret turn to add pace and speed to your ball.
Always track your depth. If you're hitting soft and the ball goes short, it's easy to hit hard to increase depth.
BUT, if you're hitting normal and the ball goes deep, you really have to rely on more spin or lower net clearance, to keep the ball IN.

BSTAFF
12-06-2009, 10:03 AM
Thanks for all the responses. I'll definitely work on these things in my next hitting session and let you know how it goes.

user92626
12-06-2009, 11:27 AM
I'm currently working on this aspect, too. What I have been doing that gives me success to an extent is drop a ball with the non-hitting hand and hit it aggressively. You can also try tossing it a bit farther out and hit. Discover how you can impart pace and spin that way.

Nellie
12-06-2009, 12:00 PM
When I forehand is missing, I focus on bending at the knees and getting early preparation on the unit turn.

LeeD
12-07-2009, 10:17 AM
BStaff.... read your post again...
Aggressive forehand is something you don't hit all the time, but a once in maybe 3 shot for a forcing shot or winner.
If you're hitting the net, you are applying too much topspin, not enough arc. Topspin brings the ball down.
When you're going for aggressive shots, you should swing faster and harder, not the same as your rallying groundstrokes.
Easiest solution is higher followthru with faster swing, for aggressive shots.
Better solution is flatter followthru with faster swing, so the ball is hit with LESS topspin, but much more ballspeed.

user92626
12-07-2009, 11:50 AM
IMO, aggressive FH is what you should hit all the time when you have control of the point. It's called attacking, hence server always likely win and they must. Why do you go for casual rally? It's pointless.

VaBeachTennis
12-07-2009, 11:53 AM
Maybe you are rushing your stroke and pulling your head out of the shot too soon? Try to focus on the ball and keep your head still throughout the stroke and see how that works.
I noticed that I tend to "net" shots when I pull my head out of the stroke to watch my opponent or look toward where I want the ball to go. Good luck.

LeeD
12-07-2009, 11:58 AM
Attacking ?????
Everyone else on this board wants to sit back 7' behind the baseline and trade slow, topspinny groundies until one of them gets a heart attack, or dies from boredom. That's the way everyone seems to think, and to alter that notion with a FORCING forehand is just out of their way of thinking.
Me, I agree with User..... when I can reach my forehand, it's a forcing winner or loser shot, period. Why mess around trading dinkers when you can hit a winner?

VaBeachTennis
12-07-2009, 12:01 PM
Attacking ?????
Everyone else on this board wants to sit back 7' behind the baseline and trade slow, topspinny groundies until one of them gets a heart attack, or dies from boredom. That's the way everyone seems to think, and to alter that notion with a FORCING forehand is just out of their way of thinking.
Me, I agree with User..... when I can reach my forehand, it's a forcing winner or loser shot, period. Why mess around trading dinkers when you can hit a winner?

Too funny man!!!

GuyClinch
12-07-2009, 12:32 PM
I think the appropriate in game fix is to try to make sure your getting the racquet well below the ball. This will prevent you from hitting too flat and thus into the tape.. Tom Avery (video coach) always says think about getting your racquet a foot below. Alot of people don't like Tom Avery and the foot below is obviously impossible on some low bouncing shots. However just thinking like that can prevent you from hitting too flat..

In practice you can work with a pro and check other parts of your fundamentals like your unit turn and such.

Pete

LeeD
12-07-2009, 03:14 PM
I think too much emphasis on topspin.
You can hit a flat shot into the court with a lower followthru, like the same height as the ball. Just aim it 2-3' above the netcord.

Funbun
12-07-2009, 03:23 PM
Wouldn't it be better if you just aimed higher? The topspin will bring it down anyhow.

Blake0
12-07-2009, 05:25 PM
It was a technical issue i'm starting to fix for me, i started to lay the wrist back at contact, because it was releasing too soon..now i'm able to fire forehands more often and have more control, plus feeling more confident. :)

Aggressive forehands are meant to end points/gain control of a rally. So if you hit loopy topspin forehands, its unlikely that it will be aggressive unless you're nadal or playing at a low level..like 3.0. I prefer to end points hitting flat or hit with topspin with a flatter trajectory to gain control of the rally.

Slazenger07
12-07-2009, 06:55 PM
My forehand is never off. Heavy topspin is the way.

Slazenger07
12-07-2009, 07:00 PM
It was a technical issue i'm starting to fix for me, i started to lay the wrist back at contact, because it was releasing too soon..now i'm able to fire forehands more often and have more control, plus feeling more confident. :)

Aggressive forehands are meant to end points/gain control of a rally. So if you hit loopy topspin forehands, its unlikely that it will be aggressive unless you're nadal or playing at a low level..like 3.0. I prefer to end points hitting flat or hit with topspin with a flatter trajectory to gain control of the rally.

That is so untrue, I play at 4.5 level, Im not amazing or anything but Im pretty damn good and my loopy topspin forehands are incredibly aggressive, because of their depth and the ridiculous amounts of spin I put on them. They may not be fast at first, but once they hit the court theyre kicking really fast and aggressively. Some of my forehands will actually jump 3/4 or more of the way up the fence after landing deep in the court. So loopy forehands can definetly be aggressive at any level of play.

Blake0
12-07-2009, 07:26 PM
That is so untrue, I play at 4.5 level, Im not amazing or anything but Im pretty damn good and my loopy topspin forehands are incredibly aggressive, because of their depth and the ridiculous amounts of spin I put on them. They may not be fast at first, but once they hit the court theyre kicking really fast and aggressively. Some of my forehands will actually jump 3/4 or more of the way up the fence after landing deep in the court. So loopy forehands can definetly be aggressive at any level of play.

Well maybe i was wording it wrong..what i meant to say was, just brushing up the back of the ball won't do you much good in being aggressive and forcing shots, you'll have to hit through the ball more to make it more aggressive, although i prefer hitting flatter because of the increased mph as it travels through the court.

Bungalo Bill
12-07-2009, 08:01 PM
Maybe you are rushing your stroke and pulling your head out of the shot too soon? Try to focus on the ball and keep your head still throughout the stroke and see how that works.
I noticed that I tend to "net" shots when I pull my head out of the stroke to watch my opponent or look toward where I want the ball to go. Good luck.

This is the correct direction to solve this problem. Several issues are pointed out here that a player needs to stop doing before a bad habit(s) develops.

So what Va is providing insight on are the following:

1. Overhitting.

2. Keeping your balance.

3. Keeping your head still in the shot.

4. The non-dominant arms role in this

First off, players at times do not realize how hard they are swinging and how off balance they are when they do. The reason is when you hit some balls with success even though your technique was questionnable, you slowly start hitting harder and harder and soon you engrain bad habits. These bad habits become "natural" and it is hard to figure out what is going on. You just know you are frustrated.

Back to the Fundamentals!

1. A player in this boat needs to understand that when the ball is going into the net, they are hitting high on the ball. If they are hitting high on the ball it could be from:

1. Rushing the stroke and mistiming their rise through the ball.

2. Hitting off balance because they are swinging to hard.

3. Not using their non-dominant arm to hold and manage their form in the stroke.

Remedy:

1. Find the rally stroke again. Hit and learn to be satisfied with less octane in your shots. Hit your rally ball, the one you move around, and 80% power and play for consistency. When you get the one you need to press on the gas, remember most likely you are closer to the net, so your backswing gets a little shorter or more controlled.

2. Make sure you are involving your non-dominant arm in the shot.

3. Slow down the feed until you are htting with enough power to move the ball around and keep the ball in play.

VaBeachTennis
12-08-2009, 06:46 PM
This is the correct direction to solve this problem. Several issues are pointed out here that a player needs to stop doing before a bad habit(s) develops.

So what Va is providing insight on are the following:

1. Overhitting.

2. Keeping your balance.

3. Keeping your head still in the shot.

4. The non-dominant arms role in this

First off, players at times do not realize how hard they are swinging and how off balance they are when they do. The reason is when you hit some balls with success even though your technique was questionnable, you slowly start hitting harder and harder and soon you engrain bad habits. These bad habits become "natural" and it is hard to figure out what is going on. You just know you are frustrated.

Back to the Fundamentals!

1. A player in this boat needs to understand that when the ball is going into the net, they are hitting high on the ball. If they are hitting high on the ball it could be from:

1. Rushing the stroke and mistiming their rise through the ball.

2. Hitting off balance because they are swinging to hard.

3. Not using their non-dominant arm to hold and manage their form in the stroke.

Remedy:

1. Find the rally stroke again. Hit and learn to be satisfied with less octane in your shots. Hit your rally ball, the one you move around, and 80% power and play for consistency. When you get the one you need to press on the gas, remember most likely you are closer to the net, so your backswing gets a little shorter or more controlled.

2. Make sure you are involving your non-dominant arm in the shot.

3. Slow down the feed until you are htting with enough power to move the ball around and keep the ball in play.

Excellent points, excellent post!

The real "eye opener" to one's mechanic's in my opinion, is when you hit with the "old folks" who give you very little pace and shots that you don't like. If you can't control the ball with these folks, then you have a problem with your mechanics (footwork, positioning, timing, and overall stroke). It's a real "experience", especially when they are good and play tournaments nationally...............
The only way I overcome it, is when I apply what BB said above. When I hit with the "old folks", it leaves me longing to hit with the younger players who hit with pace and topspin, it's much easier. I'm sure others have the same experience.

Bungalo Bill
12-09-2009, 03:40 PM
Excellent points, excellent post!

The real "eye opener" to one's mechanic's in my opinion, is when you hit with the "old folks" who give you very little pace and shots that you don't like. If you can't control the ball with these folks, then you have a problem with your mechanics (footwork, positioning, timing, and overall stroke). It's a real "experience", especially when they are good and play tournaments nationally...............

That is very true.

papa
12-09-2009, 06:05 PM
Excellent points, excellent post!

The real "eye opener" to one's mechanic's in my opinion, is when you hit with the "old folks" who give you very little pace and shots that you don't like. If you can't control the ball with these folks, then you have a problem with your mechanics (footwork, positioning, timing, and overall stroke). It's a real "experience", especially when they are good and play tournaments nationally...............
The only way I overcome it, is when I apply what BB said above. When I hit with the "old folks", it leaves me longing to hit with the younger players who hit with pace and topspin, it's much easier. I'm sure others have the same experience.

Not that I would be included in your "old folks" category but can't help but wonder if you are applying any figures to this group? If you come to Florida, look me up, I give you a run for your money - not maybe in singles play but in hitting and you just might learn a thing or two in the process.

Confusedaboutgear
12-09-2009, 07:04 PM
Hi, recently I have been having issues with my aggressive forehand. This is usually one of my best shots. What I mean by aggressive is putting a little more pace on the ball and trying to the opponent around the court. Now when I try to hit this shot lately almost all of my shots have been going into the net. I feel like I'm swinging the same as usual and it also feels the same. I just don't know how to fix this. Any tips or ideas on how to get it back to normal?
Thanks

Bend your knees more ? i dunno thats usually what happens to me when i cant hit my aggressive forehands.

VaBeachTennis
12-09-2009, 07:07 PM
Not that I would be included in your "old folks" category but can't help but wonder if you are applying any figures to this group? If you come to Florida, look me up, I give you a run for your money - not maybe in singles play but in hitting and you just might learn a thing or two in the process.

LOL, Papa. I have the greatest respect for the "old folks"! I'm in my early 40's (42), the "old folks" I am referring to are 60+, the "old folks" I am referring to are like that Greek guy that was featured on one of the more recent threads, ATHLETES. These guys can be run around, but they are less out of breath than their counterparts who are 20+ years younger. When I play with these guys (rallies/sets), I always feel like done multiple sets on a stair master or something.

I'd love to look you up if I go down to Florida and I'm sure that I would learn many things by hitting with you. My mother-in-law lives in the "panhandle".

I hope that you didn't think I was insulting "old folks", my post was basically one expressing admiration and respect for them. Like I said above, these guys are athletes, they have more defined calf muscles and better endurance than many of their younger counterparts. They also have more "court sense". Most of the times when we are playing, I have a BIG smile on my face, because I feel like I am getting "schooled" by my Dad who passed away some years ago.

user92626
12-09-2009, 07:38 PM
Talking about old folks there are quite a few at the court I play. First time I played against them they (for lack of word) swirled their rackets around that their shots barely crossed over the net. I got so confused with reading them and even more disoriented after a few runnings to retrieve the shots. It was horrible playing with those 70+ folks.

Now when i play against them I just stand deep in no man's land. Easy to run forward; and even when they hit deep I'd just do a bounceless groundstroke. :)

GuyClinch
12-10-2009, 04:01 AM
I think too much emphasis on topspin.
You can hit a flat shot into the court with a lower followthru, like the same height as the ball. Just aim it 2-3' above the netcord.

Sure you can but if you keep hitting the tape.. adding more topspin just to get your ball in is a logical cure.. <g> I am not talking about a huge change in your stroke - just an adjustment. Of course your a guy who prides himself on always hitting 'winners' if you get your racquet on the ball LMAO..

papa
12-10-2009, 05:09 AM
LOL, Papa. I have the greatest respect for the "old folks"! I'm in my early 40's (42), the "old folks" I am referring to are 60+, the "old folks" I am referring to are like that Greek guy that was featured on one of the more recent threads, ATHLETES. These guys can be run around, but they are less out of breath than their counterparts who are 20+ years younger. When I play with these guys (rallies/sets), I always feel like done multiple sets on a stair master or something.

I'd love to look you up if I go down to Florida and I'm sure that I would learn many things by hitting with you. My mother-in-law lives in the "panhandle".

I hope that you didn't think I was insulting "old folks", my post was basically one expressing admiration and respect for them. Like I said above, these guys are athletes, they have more defined calf muscles and better endurance than many of their younger counterparts. They also have more "court sense". Most of the times when we are playing, I have a BIG smile on my face, because I feel like I am getting "schooled" by my Dad who passed away some years ago.

No offense taken. You Dad must have been a good guy because he raised a sensible son.

Although the clock keeps ticking away, many of us in the age group you alluded to are still at it because we love the game and the people who play it. Many of my friends are in your age group and I enjoy their company and competition. I got to talk with and watch several last night who are your age, maybe a spec older (Arias, Lendl & Macpherson).

We live a few hours south of the panhandle on the west coast.

papa
12-10-2009, 05:16 AM
Talking about old folks there are quite a few at the court I play. First time I played against them they (for lack of word) swirled their rackets around that their shots barely crossed over the net. I got so confused with reading them and even more disoriented after a few runnings to retrieve the shots. It was horrible playing with those 70+ folks.

Now when i play against them I just stand deep in no man's land. Easy to run forward; and even when they hit deep I'd just do a bounceless groundstroke. :)

Have you seen people like Main, Bedard, Bachman, Van Nostrand, etc. play?

Time marches on my friend; your in the parade but you might not realize it yet.

LeeD
12-10-2009, 10:44 AM
GuyCinch...
If you still gotta make a slight adjustment to ADD topspin to clear the net, why not make a slight adjustement and hit the ball slightly higher to clear the net? That way, you can hit a faster moving ball with less energy, and since you made the slight posture adjustment, it clears the net every time.
Isn't it easier to adjust just your posture than to create a whole new stroke, new grip POSSIBLY, and new feetstance, while swing harder with a new kinetic base?
As for winners.... no, I can't hit a winner every time I touch the ball, because I say I"m trying to END the point within 3 shots, means I'm TRYING to hit a forcing shot FIRST ball.

brad1730
12-10-2009, 02:39 PM
In my experience, when I'm hitting into the net it's because I haven't opened my chest up enough. I use a western grip and hit with a lot of topspin - and when I'm too closed, I will often go into the net. And when I go long, it's often because I haven't laid my wrist back.

GuyClinch
12-10-2009, 10:41 PM
If you still gotta make a slight adjustment to ADD topspin to clear the net, why not make a slight adjustement and hit the ball slightly higher to clear the net? That way, you can hit a faster moving ball with less energy, and since you made the slight posture adjustment, it clears the net every time. Isn't it easier to adjust just your posture than to create a whole new stroke, new grip POSSIBLY, and new feetstance, while swing harder with a new kinetic base?

You remind me of that other old anti-topsin guy.. Golden dog..or whatever his name was.

Anyway in a nutshell topspin is the preferred adjustment. Here is why. If your hitting "flat" then your racquet angle has to be at the perfect angle depending on the ball height such that you can clear that net. Any deviation will send that ball either into the net - or far long. This is true if your hitting with power.

However if your hitting with a good deal of topspin -you don't have to get that angle just right. You can hit with a slightly closed face, a perfectly flat face or even slightly open and still keep that ball in the court and over the net. <g> That topspin gives you a little more room for error so to speak. And it can be used to correct problems as well.

Hitting flat and just barely clearing the tape is a great useful skill. We all wish we could do this consistently on any ball. However adding a touch more topspin when your sending everything into the tape strikes me as a smart adjustment.. I wasn't talking about a sea change just saying if your always nailing the tape (though this strikes me as an exaggeration) a little topspin will solve your problem. No need for a grip change or a footwork change or anything like that.. Just dial up a touch more topspin..

Pete