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View Full Version : Learning the 2hbh, which pros should I be learned from?


ogruskie
12-06-2009, 01:09 AM
I need to watch some videos of good two handed backhand players to learn from.

mental midget
12-06-2009, 05:11 AM
I need to watch some videos of good two handed backhand players to learn from.

i've always preferred the one-hander, but one guy who really hit the 2hbh with style, effectiveness, and ridiculous versatility is marcelo rios. probably just a function of having some of the best hands in the history of the game, but it's worth a look.

you'll get plenty of responses for safin, murray, agassi, all good choices as well. kafelnikov should probably be in the conversation, too.

borg number one
12-06-2009, 05:44 AM
Mats Wilander had a real nice 2 handed backhand that you could learn from. I like how he would release the second hand upon follow through with the shot.

Plus, he often used the one-handed slice shot quite effectively:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Efmy72bXH0c (1988 US Open Final, Wilander-Lendl, Uploaded by TT Poster Krosero)

Then, here's a battle between 2 greats, each with great 2 handed backhands:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Efmy72bXH0c

(1994 French Open First Round Match, Agassi-Wilander)

Ash_Smith
12-06-2009, 06:02 AM
Most recently Safin and Murray - technically excellent the pair of them and therefore great models to copy.

featherlight
12-06-2009, 06:09 AM
how about safin

adista4
12-06-2009, 07:28 AM
How About Andreeeeeeeeeeeee????????????????

LeeD
12-06-2009, 07:37 AM
3/4 of the time, 2HBH's are oft hand forehands.
But more important, you have to watch as many 2HBH's as you can, and adopt the technique that works for your physique, your mental abilities, your physical skills, and your temperament.
Ain't so simple to copy ONE player and hit like him.

phoenicks
12-06-2009, 10:37 AM
Nalbandian, Safin, Djokovic.

ms87
12-06-2009, 10:38 AM
nalbandian by a mile and a half

Nellie
12-06-2009, 10:46 AM
These days - I am really liking Del Porto's backhand. Nothing fancy, but no errors either coming from that side.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9QA4QQMDuqg

ogruskie
12-06-2009, 11:18 AM
Thanks for the responses guys. Lately I've been watching a lot of Del Potro's backhands, and they really appeal to me. I tried to imitate it within my own game, and I seemed to get good results. I'll check out the other players listed, too.

user92626
12-06-2009, 11:39 AM
No one has mentioned Nadal. So I will. If you want a high percentage bh, pick up his. It's brushy and rely on angular impact with the racket face a little closed. I could hit like that sometimes and produce easy topspin and kinda hard to have enough strength to send the ball long with such stroke.

AAAA
12-06-2009, 11:48 AM
What you see on tv is just the end result and not the theory behind it. For that get a tennis instruction manual or see a coach.

tricky
12-06-2009, 02:32 PM
When looking at pros, keep in mind that a 2H BH is not like a baseball swing. You don't swing around the body laterally. It may look like that with pros, but that is because their 2H BH are at an extremely high level.

Mick
12-06-2009, 03:40 PM
anybody except for jim courier because his 2hbh looked really akward although it was quite effective.

CallOfBooty
12-06-2009, 03:51 PM
Nalbandian for sure. His technique is great and his motion is very fluid and relaxed. If I were you I would try to emulate Nalbandian's backhand.

Here is a great article I suggest you read: http://www.tennis.com/yourgame/instructionarticles/backhand/backhand.aspx?id=505 .

5263
12-06-2009, 04:23 PM
Nalbandian for sure. His technique is great and his motion is very fluid and relaxed. If I were you I would try to emulate Nalbandian's backhand.
.

I agree with Nalbandian

Fedace
12-06-2009, 04:28 PM
Chris Evert Lloyd. she was the best. Simple and yet perfect.

sruckauf
12-06-2009, 04:36 PM
Yevgeny Kafelnikov was my personal favorite. Simple form, and very balanced. Although I agree Nalbandian is a close second.

chancep2120
12-06-2009, 04:44 PM
Nalbandian for sure. His technique is great and his motion is very fluid and relaxed. If I were you I would try to emulate Nalbandian's backhand.

Here is a great article I suggest you read: http://www.tennis.com/yourgame/instructionarticles/backhand/backhand.aspx?id=505 .

agree =) 10 char

Vyse
12-06-2009, 04:49 PM
i think djokovic and davydenko's are great. i love rafas but im not sure its the best to copy. safins is real nice too

tennisguy2009
12-06-2009, 06:03 PM
whose 2hb do you guys reckon meets the below criteria:

1) a lot of net clearance
2) loopy ball flight path, because of heavy topspin
3) consistent and reliable

Nadal?

blackfrido
12-06-2009, 06:20 PM
Nalbandian, don't look anywhere else!

tennisguy2009
12-06-2009, 06:24 PM
lol coz I play at 5.0 level and I am about to attempt to learn a 2hb (I play 1hb at the moment)

going to try it for 1 week or two, maybe I will post up some video

tennisguy2009
12-06-2009, 06:28 PM
watching Nalbandian vs nadal i noticed that

Nalbandian preps with raquet face pointing at left fence of court
but nadal preps the backhand with the racket face pointing exactly down at the court?

Nalbandian also keeps his forehand_arm elbow tighter to his body than nadal?

xFullCourtTenniSx
12-06-2009, 06:36 PM
No one has mentioned Nadal. So I will. If you want a high percentage bh, pick up his. It's brushy and rely on angular impact with the racket face a little closed. I could hit like that sometimes and produce easy topspin and kinda hard to have enough strength to send the ball long with such stroke.

Yeah well the OP isn't a natural lefty.

There's no other way you can produce such spin and height on loopers as well as being able to hit crazy flat bombs so high over the net.

Bungalo Bill
12-06-2009, 09:11 PM
I need to watch some videos of good two handed backhand players to learn from.

My advice to you is learn the key fundamentals of the twohanded backhand. The swing resembles my four step forehand sequence. There is plenty of advice on the twohanded backhand here. Some players here that have saved certain threads can provide them for you.

The key areas are:

1. Conditioning

2. Footwork (includes footspeed and patterns)

3. Movement, ball judgement, and recovery

4. Your stroke technique

All pros have developed their fundamentals (some better than others) and have many similarities.

Differences get into backswing length, stance most often used, preferred grips, etc...

However, the reason I say "learn the common fundamentals" is because you should want to develop your own style and preferances within those fundamentals. Otherwise you will struggle to be someone else that you are not.

Test certain things like grips, stances, and backswings. However, don't go outside the fundamentals until you have mastered enough of the technique to test some things.

Mahboob Khan
12-06-2009, 09:45 PM
watching Nalbandian vs nadal i noticed that

Nalbandian preps with raquet face pointing at left fence of court
but nadal preps the backhand with the racket face pointing exactly down at the court?

Nalbandian also keeps his forehand_arm elbow tighter to his body than nadal?

Yes, Nalbandian's, Safin, Djokovic, and Davydenko's BHs are best to copy. I do not see the benefit of keeping the racket face close in the backswing. It is better to keep it natural - vertical. If it is closed slightly say 92 degrees that's ok.

Mahboob Khan

Bungalo Bill
12-07-2009, 06:28 PM
Yes, Nalbandian's, Safin, Djokovic, and Davydenko's BHs are best to copy. I do not see the benefit of keeping the racket face close in the backswing. It is better to keep it natural - vertical. If it is closed slightly say 92 degrees that's ok.

Mahboob Khan

Mahboob,

Good to hear from you. Where have you been?

Blake0
12-07-2009, 07:05 PM
Heres a good 2hbh video. Show's safins, tsongas, and other pro's 2hbh. I believe you should watch a variety of pro's backhands and not copy just one. Learn the essential fundamentals from different pro's and make your own. This is where coaching comes in to lead you in the right path and make sure you don't form bad habits and are doing the fundamentals properly, and that your form is benefiting you and not hurting you. If not they teach you a basic form and want you to evolve from there.
http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=xstf#p/u/0/2PvSJP7CRZM

tennisdude083
12-07-2009, 08:02 PM
Yeah well the OP isn't a natural lefty.

There's no other way you can produce such spin and height on loopers as well as being able to hit crazy flat bombs so high over the net.

I agree. Nadal's will be almost impossible to copy unless you are playing with your non-dominant hand.

I also agree with all the users who have said Safin and Nalbandian. Both beautiful 2-handers.

BigT
12-09-2009, 07:53 PM
On my website, I have some great clips of 2hbh's.

ilikephobo
12-09-2009, 08:00 PM
I personally think Nadal's backhand looks really nice and i kinda learned off of Nadal. my backhand is actually noticeably heavier then my forehand =P. Does it help that im sort of ambidextrous. Like i do everything athletic with my left side but everything else (writing, cutting with knife etc. ) with my right?

user92626
12-09-2009, 08:17 PM
I personally think Nadal's backhand looks really nice and i kinda learned off of Nadal. my backhand is actually noticeably heavier then my forehand =P. Does it help that im sort of ambidextrous. Like i do everything athletic with my left side but everything else (writing, cutting with knife etc. ) with my right?


I'm like that, too, and I have no answer for you. Frankly, I started out with a bh that I couldn't hit to save my life. I still remember a guy told me that whenever they wanted to get points they'd just go to my bh side. Well, after almost 2 years I believe I can go head to head against any stroke with my 2hbh. (BH is only difficult if it's involved running.)

BB is right about giving the fundamentals. 1, 2, 3 are something you should have picked up already when you learned the FH . So, it's just the stroke technicals. Well, guess what, it's ...nothing different from FH (at least to me). I have understood very well the contact point, angle face, swing path. So it's just a matter of producing it in the most comfortable and powerful manner. Try to see it that way.

Hope that helps any struggling 2bhanders out there. ;)

Pink_Shirt
12-10-2009, 09:37 PM
Djokovic has a really easy looking backhand technique, not too hard to follow. In a video he posted around the USO he said when he was a kid that he used a 1h backhand but was too little to really do anything with it, so players would just pick on this weakness. Now look at him, his backhand is probably his best shot.

Bungalo Bill
12-11-2009, 08:48 AM
I'm like that, too, and I have no answer for you. Frankly, I started out with a bh that I couldn't hit to save my life. I still remember a guy told me that whenever they wanted to get points they'd just go to my bh side. Well, after almost 2 years I believe I can go head to head against any stroke with my 2hbh. (BH is only difficult if it's involved running.)

BB is right about giving the fundamentals. 1, 2, 3 are something you should have picked up already when you learned the FH . So, it's just the stroke technicals. Well, guess what, it's ...nothing different from FH (at least to me). I have understood very well the contact point, angle face, swing path. So it's just a matter of producing it in the most comfortable and powerful manner. Try to see it that way.

Hope that helps any struggling 2bhanders out there. ;)

Yup, if players focus on the fundamentals, they keep their development in tennis simple, effective, and efficient for their growth.

Coaches need to do the same. Fundamentals are the key to improving a player without bogging them down in too many details, unnessary directions, and providing misguided tennis instruction.

Teaching fundamentals allows a player to learn to be their own coach in a match, have the ability to make corrections, adjust their game, and develop their way to play tennis within a sustainable goals setting and practice environment.

Coaches should have their main goal in coaching themselves out of a job. The better the player gets, the less they need you as a coach.

TheFuture101
12-12-2009, 05:33 PM
Hey. I know my advice isn't as offical as bb or other coachs and pro but I strongly suggest a one hand back. If you plan to play at a high level the two hand will hold you down. It forces you to have good footwork, you can power through flat strokes or topspin, your one hand slice will be more solid, you can react quicker to a fast ball, have much more reach than tight 2 hand and volleying is much easier if you are use to one hand. If you don't believe me take a look the majority of tennis legends who had one. btw you don't look like a baby like del porto with his twohand and he is 6'5...

Bungalo Bill
12-13-2009, 09:05 AM
Hey. I know my advice isn't as offical as bb or other coachs and pro but I strongly suggest a one hand back. If you plan to play at a high level the two hand will hold you down. It forces you to have good footwork, you can power through flat strokes or topspin, your one hand slice will be more solid, you can react quicker to a fast ball, have much more reach than tight 2 hand and volleying is much easier if you are use to one hand. If you don't believe me take a look the majority of tennis legends who had one. btw you don't look like a baby like del porto with his twohand and he is 6'5...

Future,

You left yourself open for debate with your advice above. Let me provide some infor on the twohanded backhand. Also, both backhands have their strengths and weaknesses.

1. The twohanded backhand is played at top levels. Many many pro players use the twohanded backhand. Twohanded backhand players have also won top tournaments and have competed at a high-level of play.

2. The twohanded backhand does not hold anyone down. It simply is a different way to hit a backhand. In fact, the twohanded backhand adds strength to the backhand and allows a player to disguise their shots, have flexibility as to when to make contact with the ball, and is an excellent stroke for the return of serve.

3. The twohanded backhand als forces a player to have good footwork. There is not a stroke that doesn't. Footwork for the twohanded is critical because with twohands on the racquet while moving, it is easier to lose one's balance. It is in the setup and weight transfer that the onehander probably demands more because it is a front foot hitting stroke but IMO that is it. Otherwise, both strokes demand good footwork.

4. The twohanded backhand is more flexible in the stances used as well. An open stance twohander is more acceptable for club players than for a onehanded backhand.

5. The twohanded backhand can hit flat and with topspin. Players with twohanded backhands should also learn to let go of the tophand and slice through the ball just as a onehander needs to learn. The slice backhand should be developed for both types of players. Also, a twohander can have a solid slice. It just takes practice.

6. Reacting quicker to a fast ball is one of a twohanders strengths. With the flexibility in taking the ball later and the strength of the twohands, twohanders have a definete advantage in this area.

7. The twohanded backhand is not inihibited by reach especially if they have a slice backhand. Although a onehanded backhand could reach out more, it is not recommended to do that. however, a twohander can swing oout more if they need too and it is not tight as you indicated.

8. Volleying should happen with one arm anyway. Just like the slice, a twohanded player can volley very well. I am one of them. ;)

TheFuture101
12-13-2009, 10:16 AM
Can you tell me why del porto uses two hand instead of one? Sorry about arrogant post but history has shown the legends have had one hands. Learning the backhand just depends where you want to go with tennis I guess.

soyizgood
12-13-2009, 10:40 AM
Can you tell me why del porto uses two hand instead of one? Sorry about arrogant post but history has shown the legends have had one hands. Learning the backhand just depends where you want to go with tennis I guess.

History also shows most legends had continental or eastern forehands, but you don't see those grips around much now...:confused:

Bungalo Bill
12-13-2009, 05:44 PM
Can you tell me why del porto uses two hand instead of one? Sorry about arrogant post but history has shown the legends have had one hands. Learning the backhand just depends where you want to go with tennis I guess.

Your post wasn't arrogant. You are a onehanded backhand player that believes in how you hit the ball. Twohanded backhand players can be the same way. What I tried to do was simply round out your passion for the onehanded backhand.

It is a great stroke but it isn't for everyone. Many players struggle with the onehanded backhand. Some don't.

Yes, the legends had onehanded backhands. However, there are legends that have the twohanded backhand as well. Perhaps during the old days not as much as the twohander wasn't as popular. However, there are plenty of excellent players that hit the twohanded backhand.

Cindysphinx
12-14-2009, 04:00 AM
The Future,

Nine of the current top ten ATP players use 2HBH.

Mahboob Khan
12-14-2009, 05:17 AM
Mahboob,

Good to hear from you. Where have you been?

At Rants and Raves!

Lately, I have been spending some time there to present true face of Islam to our Jewish and Christian brothers. You may like to read:

The Jews of Torah and Muslims of Al-Qur'an are brothers!

Just a warning. That's not for people with weaker hearts! LOL.

I wish you and your family Season's Holidays and Merry Christmas!

Bungalo Bill
12-14-2009, 07:26 AM
At Rants and Raves!

Lately, I have been spending some time there to present true face of Islam to our Jewish and Christian brothers. You may like to read:

The Jews of Torah and Muslims of Al-Qur'an are brothers!

Just a warning. That's not for people with weaker hearts! LOL.

I wish you and your family Season's Holidays and Merry Christmas!

Yes, I am sure it is not a lite conversation. I rarely leave this board but I might just wonder over.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you and your family as well.