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xr3fgb
12-06-2009, 10:24 AM
Q: are ping-ing noises the function of the string's or the racquet's structural condition?

lawlitssoo1n
12-06-2009, 10:29 AM
sound from strings. try putting a shock absorber and it will sounds more like a "thud"
i used to play w/o a shock and like the "PING" but for some reason i can't play w/o a shock and that ping noise is annoying. shock or no shock it doesn't really make a difference, it's just a matter of preference

Adam_mtl
12-06-2009, 10:40 AM
Depends on the string too. Some will "ping" more than others. In general though, I've found that when a fresh string job does ping, it will tend to fade away after a few hours and become more of a "thud" as the string "settles in".

[d]ragon
12-06-2009, 10:44 AM
Are there strings/string factors/racquet factors that determine if a racquet will ping or not? I typically can't play with a pinging racquet either but sometimes I will hit with a racquet that doesn't ping much at all despite no dampener.

Some won't believe me but from what I feel, not just hear: some dampeners just dampen the sound while some actually absorb some of the shock. I have tried playing with both and definitely feel the difference. It depends on the dampener. When some, it only tunes out the sound but not the vibration while others do both. Perhaps those who believe and probably feel there is no difference other than the sound, they have racquets that don't transmit much vibration with or without a dampener. Just my thoughts.

As I said, some racquets I hit with don't ping or vibrate much and I would like to know the factors causing this. I like the look of no dampener but just can't play without one with most sticks I've hit with.

Irvin
12-06-2009, 11:00 AM
I think most of the ping comes from the racket. You did not see all those vibration dampeners with the old wooden rackets. Although some strings do ping more than others.

Irvin

Dags
12-06-2009, 11:44 AM
ragon;4176703']Are there strings/string factors/racquet factors that determine if a racquet will ping or not? I typically can't play with a pinging racquet either but sometimes I will hit with a racquet that doesn't ping much at all despite no dampener.

Some won't believe me but from what I feel, not just hear: some dampeners just dampen the sound while some actually absorb some of the shock. I have tried playing with both and definitely feel the difference. It depends on the dampener. When some, it only tunes out the sound but not the vibration while others do both. Perhaps those who believe and probably feel there is no difference other than the sound, they have racquets that don't transmit much vibration with or without a dampener. Just my thoughts.

As I said, some racquets I hit with don't ping or vibrate much and I would like to know the factors causing this. I like the look of no dampener but just can't play without one with most sticks I've hit with.
There are a lot of posts on this board stating that a dampener alters the sound and nothing else. I find this untrue: for me there is an obvious change in the feedback or 'feel' from the racquet when I hit the ball. This differs depending on the dampener, and also placement: for example, if I tie a rubber band directly under the bottom cross I will get quite a muted, boardy feel, whereas if I slide it down so it's touching the frame it feels far more lively.

However, the one thing I don't believe is that a dampener does is prevent harmful vibrations transmitting from the racquet to your arm. If you watch a slow-motion video of a stroke, you'll see just how much the racquet moves on impact with the ball. Is a little piece of rubber going to magically soak up that energy? I'm no physicist, but I find it hard to believe that it could have any more than minimal effect. I'm sure there are people who perceive that it does, but I would attribute this to the differing sound and feel as already mentioned.

For what causes the ping, I've found it to be a combination of frame, string and acoustics. My biggest surprise was that I've found the ping is far worse outside - I had assumed that the resonance would make it louder indoors. I'm sure this is proof if proof were needed that I really am no physicist. :)

chaddles
12-06-2009, 12:38 PM
There are a couple of books out there that explain dampners (among other things) extremely well. All their evidence has concluded that all vibration dampners do is deaden the sound of the strings and that is it. I agree that it appears to effect the vibrations, but it is really just the sound that gets muted and affects the players perception.

xr3fgb
12-06-2009, 12:53 PM
I think most of the ping comes from the racket. You did not see all those vibration dampeners with the old wooden rackets. Although some strings do ping more than others.

Irvin

That's kind of what I was thinking. While it isn't my main stick, I have a Babolat Pure Storm Team MP that "feels" like the pinging is coming from the racquet. I bought it used so I don't know if it is something structural from overuse (or abuse)?

SuperDuy
12-06-2009, 01:31 PM
I don't use a dampener. Ping noise is only right after its strung for an hour then it stops. What I like about it , right when my opponents serving I band my hand against the stringbed. lol.

[d]ragon
12-06-2009, 02:50 PM
However, the one thing I don't believe is that a dampener does is prevent harmful vibrations transmitting from the racquet to your arm. If you watch a slow-motion video of a stroke, you'll see just how much the racquet moves on impact with the ball. Is a little piece of rubber going to magically soak up that energy? I'm no physicist, but I find it hard to believe that it could have any more than minimal effect. I'm sure there are people who perceive that it does, but I would attribute this to the differing sound and feel as already mentioned.


I don't know about harmful vibrations but I believe there are smaller vibrations that some dampeners do absorb. When you see videos of the racquet moving around in slow motion, the movement you see is mostly the bending of the racquet. I believe the the vibrations one feels sans a dampener is from the strings themselves moving down the frame much like when one hits keys on the piano, the string vibrations are transmitted into the air as sound but also through the piano. I could be wrong of course

There are a couple of books out there that explain dampners (among other things) extremely well. All their evidence has concluded that all vibration dampners do is deaden the sound of the strings and that is it. I agree that it appears to effect the vibrations, but it is really just the sound that gets muted and affects the players perception.

I have not read these books and analyzed what kind of evidence they provide but what I feel when playing is much more important than what anyone else says so I think I'll go by that :)

I don't use a dampener. Ping noise is only right after its strung for an hour then it stops. What I like about it , right when my opponents serving I band my hand against the stringbed. lol.

Well my strings are quite old and they ping alot. Perhaps though it is because they are old. I've never hit with a racquet without a dampener longer than 30 seconds so maybe next time I string them up, I'll use no dampener and see how that works

skyzoo
12-06-2009, 04:21 PM
Tommy haas racquet has quite a ping to it

xr3fgb
12-06-2009, 04:23 PM
sound from strings. try putting a shock absorber and it will sounds more like a "thud"
i used to play w/o a shock and like the "PING" but for some reason i can't play w/o a shock and that ping noise is annoying. shock or no shock it doesn't really make a difference, it's just a matter of preference

I use vibration dampeners religiously. The racquet in question with the dampener still pings (albeit mutedly). :confused:

ace0001a
12-06-2009, 09:31 PM
I don't use a dampener. Ping noise is only right after its strung for an hour then it stops. What I like about it , right when my opponents serving I band my hand against the stringbed. lol.

That's the first time I've heard that. Maybe it's the kind of string you use or you simply get used to it and stop noticing that it's there. I've been buying used racquets with some old string on them and they all still make a ping sound when I hit the ball. After I put on some rubber band dampeners, the sound changes to the familiar pop or thud that I prefer. Not sure how much dampeners actually reduce harmful vibrations, but for me I simply prefer the feel and sound from hitting the ball with some sort of vibration dampener installed.

Shangri La
12-07-2009, 12:59 PM
I use vibration dampeners religiously. The racquet in question with the dampener still pings (albeit mutedly). :confused:

The other day I hit with a Prince TT scream freshly strung with some luxilon. Rarely have I hit with any racquet that pings like this with a dampener. I couldnt play with it for more than 2 min. Dont know if racquets in that spec range all ping that much.

OHBH
12-07-2009, 05:41 PM
The dampeners stop the strings from vibrating (vibrations=sound). They don't absorb the shock that comes from the racquet. I think the lessening of the vibrations in the strings prolong string life (albeit not a lot).

86golf
12-07-2009, 06:22 PM
Q: are ping-ing noises the function of the string's or the racquet's structural condition?

String your racquet with a full bed of kevlar and your pinging will go away. So will your elbow, but that's another thread.

Irvin
12-08-2009, 03:12 AM
Tommy haas racquet has quite a ping to it

Tommy plays with natural gut (or at least he did) and gut does tend to have more of a ping to it.

Irvin

Irvin
12-08-2009, 03:23 AM
Funny but I just thought about this. The older wooden racket had little ping to them and the vibration dampeners did not become big until the newer bigger non-wood frames hit the market. Then everyone (almost) started using dampeners.

I for one like the ping and can't stand to use dampeners. I not only do not like the sound of the thud I do not like the feel and I think I lose some power. Maybe it is true that the dampener only takes the sound away but if one thinks it has some other effect on their game then I believe it does.

Like Yogi said, "Baseball is 90% mental, the other half is physical." Maybe tennis is the same. And now I know how players give more than 100%.

Irvin