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verbouge
12-07-2009, 08:19 AM
You all have had this type of thread posted most likely many times before. Please feel free to refer me to pertinent archives so as not to have to rehash the same old stuff over and over.

I've been playing tennis for many, many years and have always thought of stringing as something I would rather pay for than do myself. I'm beginning to want to try it myself, though, for a number of reasons. I've been doing reading online, but am soliciting the opinions of experienced stringers regarding a good choice for a first stringing machine.

I would rather buy one and only one, if possible, believing that doing it right the first time beats spending yet more money down the road for what you really want. The machine does have to be new; just reliable, accurate, and relatively easy to use.

Any help?

Dave

lawlitssoo1n
12-07-2009, 09:39 AM
1st of all what is your budget, and how often do you get your strings re-strung?

wao
12-07-2009, 09:40 AM
You all have had this type of thread posted most likely many times before. Please feel free to refer me to pertinent archives so as not to have to rehash the same old stuff over and over.

I've been playing tennis for many, many years and have always thought of stringing as something I would rather pay for than do myself. I'm beginning to want to try it myself, though, for a number of reasons. I've been doing reading online, but am soliciting the opinions of experienced stringers regarding a good choice for a first stringing machine.

I would rather buy one and only one, if possible, believing that doing it right the first time beats spending yet more money down the road for what you really want. The machine does have to be new; just reliable, accurate, and relatively easy to use.

Any help?

DaveThere are quite a few to choose from depending on how much you where looking to spend. I have a NEOS 1000 which is around $1000.00 and paid it off in what I would normally spend in a year plus stringing for a couple of buddies.

verbouge
12-07-2009, 09:51 PM
1st of all what is your budget, and how often do you get your strings re-strung?
Budget depends on what I decide upon, and string jobs depend on how much I play. I'll pay up to $1000, and I get my strings done anywhere from 1 to 4 times a month. I love hybrid blends, and am currently using Lux Alu Power 16ga mains with Wilson Sensation 16ga nylon crosses.

There was a typo in my first posting that y'all most likely caught. The machine does NOT have to be new; just quality.

ogruskie
12-08-2009, 12:21 AM
I wouldn't shell out $1000 on your first machine. What if you buy it and realize stringing isn't for you?

I suggest buying a lower end drop weight machine, such as a Silent Partner Swing. It gets the job done, and costs less than $300 (forgot what I actually paid). It might be time consuming, but if you decided you like stringing then buying something nicer.

COPEY
12-08-2009, 02:10 AM
You wouldn't happen to have a buddy that strings for himself/herself, would ya? Even if it constituted a little drive it would be worth it just to check it out, find out if you like stringing. Or maybe even the person/place where you string could give you a stringing lesson or three. I know the guy that used to string for me charges $35 a lesson. Course, I never took a lesson lol. I had no doubts about wanting to string. From a practical standpoint, if you're having your racquets done up to 4-times per month, that's more than justification for buying one; you'd pay for it in no time in savings.

I too have been playing tennis for several decades, and now that I know how easy it is I really regret not doing it years ago. You see a lot of guys say they can knock out a job in 30 min or less, which is fine. Me - I'm never in a rush, and I spend 45 min to an hour, making slow pulls (I have a crank), watching a little tv, while in my little "stringing room" where I can close myself off from the family lol.

Anyway, if you have doubts, hopefully you can figure out a way to give it a whirl before taking the plunge. ;) Oh, and if you haven't watched any of Yulitle's instructional videos (which is how I learned), check 'em out (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=4027622&postcount=13). They're extremely helpful/informative.

Lakers4Life
12-08-2009, 04:11 AM
Budget depends on what I decide upon, and string jobs depend on how much I play. I'll pay up to $1000, and I get my strings done anywhere from 1 to 4 times a month. I love hybrid blends, and am currently using Lux Alu Power 16ga mains with Wilson Sensation 16ga nylon crosses.

There was a typo in my first posting that y'all most likely caught. The machine does NOT have to be new; just quality.

Depending on were you are located, there are a lot of good used machines in Craigslist. Like a Gamma 6004 for $800 in North Carolina. There is even a Eagnas Flex 940 for $150 in FL. Look around before dropping a grand on a new machine.

verbouge
12-08-2009, 05:03 AM
Thanks for the input so far. I just kind of threw $1000 out there having read a bit and believing that I could get a whole lot of bang for buck with that amount.

A local guy who has been stringing my rackets is the one encouraging me to do it myself, and he's willing to teach me on his machine. You all most likely speak great wisdom to go and do it a few times before actually shelling out. I'm not ready to buy one just yet, anyway, so there's time. Just checking it out and getting input from the peeps who know.

Imagine if I tried to do this on a car lot....

Maesewer'z guide to machines is amazing. Have learned a ton there, and will continue to read from more sources. I may solicit YULitle's personal opinion before actually buying, too.

Thanks again.

Rabbit
12-08-2009, 06:10 AM
Good news is if you buy a Neos, you can get most all of your money back out of it.

I would offer this up, spend as much as you can afford. I've owned, over thirty years, 3 machines.

Tremont - this was even worse than a dropweight! It was the "other" cheap alternative to a Klipper back 30 years ago and I bought one. It worked, but barely. Results were not consistent and tension was not close. 45 minutes/string job
Gamma Drop Weight - nicely made, ratcheting tension head, relatively easy to use...BUT...came with floating clamps which basically knocked 8 - 10 pounds off your final string job. How do I know this? Read #3. 45 minutes/string job
Prince Neos, I had always wanted one and about ten years ago, had saved enough money that I just bought it, about a year before TW started carrying them. When I strung on my Gamma, I strung my frames at 65 pounds. When I moved to the Prince, I had to back tension down to 58 to have the same reference tension. I've now had my Neos over ten years, it is still spot on tension-wise according to my calibrator, and works like a champ. Neos machines are built like tanks and are reliable, fast, and easy to use. 20/minutes a string job
The only other piece of equipment I'm considering purchase of is a Wise tension head, but I question the need.

I'd heartily recommend the Prince and think long term you'd be more satisfied.

lawlitssoo1n
12-08-2009, 08:58 AM
Budget depends on what I decide upon, and string jobs depend on how much I play. I'll pay up to $1000, and I get my strings done anywhere from 1 to 4 times a month. I love hybrid blends, and am currently using Lux Alu Power 16ga mains with Wilson Sensation 16ga nylon crosses.

There was a typo in my first posting that y'all most likely caught. The machine does NOT have to be new; just quality.

eagnas has a lot of cheap machines that work very well, however their customer service is horrible(asian worker doens't speak english very well)

i own an eagnas combo 910 and had it for about 6 months and probably strung about 90+ frames(usually for myself and family, and occasionally friends)