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Freestyle
12-08-2009, 03:32 PM
Hi all,

I just turned fifteen a few months ago, and have begun tennis. I am pretty fit, but rather on the skinny side- five foot ten but only 117 lbs. My body fat is extremely low, but so is my muscle mass. I was hoping to bring that up a notch, maybe to around 125 lbs to 130 lbs, as well as improve my overall fitness. So I was reading some threads around here, using the search function, and I compiled a tentative routine to ask about.

I do have some amount of time to dedicate to this- not three hours a day, but some.

I thought I would start with a basic schedule of how my day goes.

6:00 A.M. - Wake up time
7:00 A.M. - Leave for school
1:50 P.M. - Physical Education; we go to the weight room two-three times a week, so I thought I'd mention it.
2:30 P.M. - School Ends. On Wed, Thurs, and Fri, I have after-school activities until around 4:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M. - usually done with homework by this time, unless I have exams, but then again, I wouldn't worry about a work out on exam days anyway.

Okay, so now is where my free time comes in. I can usually fit in at least an hour, sometimes an hour and a half, to work out at this time, except on Fridays, when I have tennis lessons from 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.

I make sure to be asleep by 10:00 P.M. as well because I can't function well without eight hours of sleep.

So, considering that I'm juggling school and extracurricular activities along with athletics, I think I've set aside a decent amount of time to make some progress, although please comment if you think I need more time.

I'm going to end this post here to leave a break for the eyes. Routine to follow on next post.

Freestyle
12-08-2009, 03:32 PM
(Reserved for routine, Thanks)

Freestyle
12-08-2009, 03:39 PM
Just realized I can't edit yet, so I'll continue here xD.

Okay, so I was thinking about how to spend my time. If I exercise five days a week, I was thinking of devoting three to pure cardio and two to weights (because of weight room in school). On cardio days, I was thinking of doing a routine like this:

10 mins warm up (dynamic stretches, light jog)
15 mins Treadmill
10 sets of 100 Jump ropes (so 1000 total, for footwork purposes as well as cardio)
15 mins exercise bike
5-10 mins cool down
15 mins flexibility exercises

And on weight days, I was not completely sure. I do have a home gym, along with a fitness club membership (in case I need machines I don't have at home). Perhaps something like this:

Chest presses
Quadricep/Other muscle in leg exercise (forget what they're called)
bicep curls
tricep exercise
Abs crunch (it's an exercise on my machine, NOT sit ups)

And I'm not sure what else.

There was also this site that I saw on these forums:

http://www.asmi.org/SportsMed/media/thrower10.swf

I'm wondering of the merit of that.

Please help me, thanks.

teppeiahn1
12-08-2009, 04:34 PM
you can try out the p90x.
I downloaded for free. and its prety intence.
I would work on flexibility and if you are trying to put your game to the next lvl, plyometrics and olympic lifts are a must. Try to do alot of compounds lifts as well instead of bicep curls lol

Freestyle
12-08-2009, 06:03 PM
I'm not at liberty to utilize... "questionable" ... methods to acquire things.

As for olympic lifts, that seems to me like a sure way to bulk up fast. I'm not looking for a massive increase, however.

charliefedererer
12-08-2009, 06:18 PM
Just realized I can't edit yet, so I'll continue here xD.



There was also this site that I saw on these forums:

http://www.asmi.org/SportsMed/media/thrower10.swf

I'm wondering of the merit of that.

Please help me, thanks.

The throwers exercises should always be at the core of your upper extremity exercising. Their purpose is not so much to make you that much more stronger in your hittining motion (although they will do that to a certain extent) but to build up the muscles that resist your hitting motion. You see, after you hit the ball, your arm is dragged foward by the momentum of the racquet, but eventually that motion has to be stopped by the resisting muscles. Since developing these "braking muscles" is often an afterthought in exercise routines, they tend to be negected and remain relatively weak, especially as you get progressively stronger. Then instead of these muscles doing the braking, the forces are transmitted to the relatively inelastic tendons and ligaments of the shoulder, elbow and wrist. And hence the epidemic of shoulder, elbow and wrist problems in tennis players. (Just check back through threads here on the health and fitnes site for proof.) An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, if you are going to hitting thousands of groundstrokes and serves, you are going to be putting a lot of stress on your arm. (Agassi's dad made him hit at least a million shots a year after age five.)

Freestyle
12-08-2009, 06:27 PM
The throwers exercises should always be at the core of your upper extremity exercising. Their purpose is not so much to make you that much more stronger in your hittining motion (although they will do that to a certain extent) but to build up the muscles that resist your hitting motion. You see, after you hit the ball, your arm is dragged foward by the momentum of the racquet, but eventually that motion has to be stopped by the resisting muscles. Since developing these "braking muscles" is often an afterthought in exercise routines, they tend to be negected and remain relatively weak, especially as you get progressively stronger. Then instead of these muscles doing the braking, the forces are transmitted to the relatively inelastic tendons and ligaments of the shoulder, elbow and wrist. And hence the epidemic of shoulder, elbow and wrist problems in tennis players. (Just check back through threads here on the health and fitnes site for proof.) An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, if you are going to hitting thousands of groundstrokes and serves, you are going to be putting a lot of stress on your arm. (Agassi's dad made him hit at least a million shots a year after age five.)

Oh my. Excellent explanation, thanks.

So where would you fit that on my schedule?

Should I be doing that every day?

charliefedererer
12-08-2009, 06:31 PM
Just realized I can't edit yet, so I'll continue here xD.

Okay, so I was thinking about how to spend my time. If I exercise five days a week, I was thinking of devoting three to pure cardio and two to weights (because of weight room in school). On cardio days, I was thinking of doing a routine like this:

10 mins warm up (dynamic stretches, light jog)
15 mins Treadmill
10 sets of 100 Jump ropes (so 1000 total, for footwork purposes as well as cardio)
15 mins exercise bike
5-10 mins cool down
15 mins flexibility exercises

And on weight days, I was not completely sure. I do have a home gym, along with a fitness club membership (in case I need machines I don't have at home). Perhaps something like this:

Chest presses
Quadricep/Other muscle in leg exercise (forget what they're called)
bicep curls
tricep exercise
Abs crunch (it's an exercise on my machine, NOT sit ups)

Please help me, thanks.

Everyone modifies their regimen as they get more fit. And tennis players also have to modify their program depending how much tennis they are playing, so winter in colder areas of the Nothern Hemisphere is an excellent time to really work on their fitness, given the relative expense of indoor courts. Is that the case with you?

As you are starting out, a well rounded program with perhaps ten reps may be a good way to get started on the weights. Then it's going to be fewer reps at weights closer to your maximum lift that will build strength. Here is a link that may give you some other ideas:
http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=249177&itype=7418
http://www.usta.com/USTA/Global/PlayerDevelopment/Sport_Science/all/114695_Strength__Conditioning_Circuit_Training_for _Tennis.aspx

Make sure you do plenty of lunges.
While some rope jumping is great, just be mindful the most common serious lower extremity injury in tennis players involves the knees. So if you jump, do so on a padded surface with good shock absorbing shoes. And think about stair running as an alternative, as it's not the push up that is hard on the knees, it's the shock on the way down. On the steps, you are cutting out eight inches of step down, and yet can work on power and speed.
And many of the agility drills are putting more work on the leg muscles and motions necessary for the quick starts, stops and sudden movements that make up this game: http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=249179&itype=7418

charliefedererer
12-08-2009, 06:54 PM
Oh my. Excellent explanation, thanks.

So where would you fit that on my schedule?

Should I be doing that every day?

I am working out tonight doing heavier lifting, but will include these exercises at the end of my regimen as they hardly require maximum strength. I almost view them as a form of "dynamic warmdown".
Alternatively you could do them as often as daily if you are not playing a lot of tennis and lifting heavier as well. (As you lift heavier weights, you should give your body day of rest in between lifting to let the muscles rest and grow.)

Freestyle
12-09-2009, 02:46 PM
Thanks, I really appreciate your help.

I've been jump roping for a few years now, and I always do it on a well padded surface. Stair running is something I'll look into as well.

I live in central New Jersey. Right now, it's definitely pretty cold out, and we're having a spell of rain. I play tennis once every week for 1.5 hours, 7:30 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. on Fridays, and depending on when my team has matches, league tennis on Saturdays.

Freestyle
12-10-2009, 01:23 PM
http://www.exrx.net/Lists/PowerExercises.html

Does this site properly show the Olympic lifts?

I might try the progressions if yes.

coyfish
12-10-2009, 02:26 PM
Wow 5"10 at 117 lbs. That is crazy skinny. Im going to assume your an ectomorph. That means you are genetically skinny and have a fast moving metabolism. I am also the same way. Its hard to gain weight / muscle but easy to burn fat / lose weight.

Anyway at your age and size you don't need to be doing bicept curls or ANY isolation for that matter. You need raw overall strength. Think of your body as a pyramid. You need to focus on the building blocks / foundation before you worry about anything else.

That being said everything depends on your goals. But frankly at your size it doesn't even matter. You just need strength / size.

When you hit the gym, especially if your a beginner, I would do full body workouts. Or workouts that hit many big muscle gruops. I would do this 2-3X a week obviosly with rest days between.


Im a very experienced lifter and I could go on for pages and pages but to save you and I the grief ill post a bunch of exersizes you should be sticking to.

Bench press
SQuats
Pull ups (if you can) if not then do lateral pull downs

Push ups
Lunges
Quad extensions
Shoulder press
Deadlifts
Shrugs
Leg press
Dips

Body weight exersizes are your friend.


Thats a good arsenal of exersizes to start with. You don't need to be doing bi's / tri's. Or traps or single side isolation. Everything should be big ranges of motion incorporating lots of muscle groups. Thats the best way to gain raw strength / mass.

Thats what you can do in the weightroom. But if your anything like me than thats only 20% of the battle. The real gains happen in the kitchen. You won't gain size unless you eat. Simple as that. And just to give you some bearing as to how much some people need to eat . . .

Im 22 but when I was bulking at age 18 I ate almost 8 thousand calories a day just to gain weight. EXtremely difficult.

Freestyle
12-10-2009, 02:39 PM
Thanks for the reply.

8000 calories a DAY? That's definitely huge.

My pediatrician also tells me that I am an ectomorph. I'm not anorexic or anything like that.

Just one question: doesn't eating a large number of calories result in fat gain? Not a gain in muscle mass? Or is it necessary to gain that weight and then "convert" it to muscle mass, if you understand what I mean?

coyfish
12-10-2009, 05:24 PM
Thanks for the reply.

8000 calories a DAY? That's definitely huge.

My pediatrician also tells me that I am an ectomorph. I'm not anorexic or anything like that.

Just one question: doesn't eating a large number of calories result in fat gain? Not a gain in muscle mass? Or is it necessary to gain that weight and then "convert" it to muscle mass, if you understand what I mean?

Yes I understand completely what you mean. That same thought is on the minds of basically any begginer who wants to bulk up and gain size. People are terrified of gaining fat.

Franly with your metabolism / age you could probably get away with eating whatever you want. I don't advocate that but whatever. When I was bulking I had to eat fast food 1X per day. I simply couldn't eat 8K calories of clean food a day. It was impossible. So my post workout meals were like triple wendy burgers and the likes. And I have never not been able to see my abs. Before my bulk when I was a skinny soccer player I was prob around 7.5% BF. After the bulk (gained like 40 lbs. just over a year it took) I was only about 11% BF. Still clear as day 6 pack.

Now that thats out of the way. You will gain a little strength at your same size but it won't last long. In order to continue building size / strength you need to take in calories. You will build muscle as you eat. Thats what working out does. It breaks down your muscles so they rebuild stronger. With the added nutrients they will get bigger. So you don't need to gain weight which then "turns" to muscle. You gain weight as you build muscle.

To minimize the fat gain you wan't to eat as clean as possible obviosly. The scale is your friend. Set goals each week and weight yourself at a consistant time (morning). For instance each week try and gain 1-2lbs. The slower you do it the better your end results will be. The amount of calories you need is unique to you. I had to take in a ton. Maybe you will be luckier and not have to eat as much. Thats something you need to find out.

You can also do whats called "dirty bulking" which means just eat a bunch of crap to gain weight / muscle. You will obviosly gain more fat but you can burn that off after you finish. I was always active (sports) in high school but I ate pretty bad. Lots of doughnuts, sodas, candies, and fast food. Was always very skinny though. So I could probably get away with dirty bulking with minimal fat gain.

People love to critisize dirty bulking but for us ectomorphs eating enough to gain weight is very difficult.

GL and let me know if you have any more questions

TheFuture101
12-13-2009, 02:35 PM
http://www.teenbodybuilding.com/brent2.htm

Ps: Try it

Itagaki
12-13-2009, 11:24 PM
http://www.teenbodybuilding.com/brent2.htm

Ps: Try it

might be a good routine for building endurance, but i think this is more or less a waste for tennis

time would be better spent on a strength training regiment