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papa
12-11-2009, 09:36 AM
Although there are a variety of serve styles, I often pick up an element on the stroke that has always made me curious and I don't think it gets discussed much/any. In talking with players, some aren't even aware they do it.

When the server is about to serve they bend their wrist (racquet hand) downward just prior to the toss. The obvious answer, at least to me and I apparently do it myself without even thinking about it, is to emphasis the snap.

Any thoughts on this? Anybody else do this?

pgreg
12-11-2009, 09:51 AM
It creates a bit of a whiplash effect (emphasized snap).....many players do it on their forehand as well.

user92626
12-11-2009, 09:54 AM
Don't you mean wrist bending forward as in you're doing a dog shadow show? :)

I do that midly (not as much as Lubicic or even Fed), and I don't think it's for snapping. It's to get the racket head not falling too far back as you get to the shooting-an-arrow position.

precision2b
12-11-2009, 09:54 AM
Although there are a variety of serve styles, I often pick up an element on the stroke that has always made me curious and I don't think it gets discussed much/any. In talking with players, some aren't even aware they do it.

When the server is about to serve they bend their wrist (racquet hand) downward just prior to the toss. The obvious answer, at least to me and I apparently do it myself without even thinking about it, is to emphasis the snap.

Any thoughts on this? Anybody else do this?

I do and please don't tell me it is wrong... That would blow my game up!!! I do think it helps with the snap...IMO

papa
12-11-2009, 10:29 AM
I do and please don't tell me it is wrong... That would blow my game up!!! I do think it helps with the snap...IMO

No, I'm not saying or even implying that its wrong - just not something we seem to discuss much.

papa
12-11-2009, 10:38 AM
[QUOTE=user92626;4189015]Don't you mean wrist bending forward as in you're doing a dog shadow show? :)

Yeah, not much into dog shadow shows but I think your right, having the fingers bend inward somewhat toward the wrist.

I've watched many top players doing this but its certainly not something that is taught, to my knowledge anyway, and seems like kinda weird that we've picked up. At first, I thought it just a strange little habit but the more I noticed it and then realized I did it myself I was rather amazed.

mucat
12-11-2009, 10:40 AM
When the server is about to serve they bend their wrist (racquet hand) downward just prior to the toss. The obvious answer, at least to me and I apparently do it myself without even thinking about it, is to emphasis the snap.


I don't think it affect anything. The ball hasn't left your hand yet. In theory, you can pick your nose right before the toss and it will not make a different. Of course, you might have nose bleed if it is a long match...

I don't even know if I do this or not...now thanks to you, I will consciously thinking about this every serve and it will screw up whatever little serve I have left. :)

W Cats
12-11-2009, 10:57 AM
I wonder if it has anything to do with consciously or subconciously trying to create a loose arm?

larry10s
12-11-2009, 11:08 AM
Although there are a variety of serve styles, I often pick up an element on the stroke that has always made me curious and I don't think it gets discussed much/any. In talking with players, some aren't even aware they do it.

When the server is about to serve they bend their wrist (racquet hand) downward just prior to the toss. The obvious answer, at least to me and I apparently do it myself without even thinking about it, is to emphasis the snap.

Any thoughts on this? Anybody else do this?

papa good observation. coaching mastery comments on the wrist flexion. ithinkit has to do with keeping the racqet face and palm closed on the take back. but i need to look that up

mtommer
12-11-2009, 12:16 PM
Because the serving motion is similar to the throwing motion, this movement of the wrist most likely just comes naturally to the player. It doesn't really help anything in the serve per se, though it undoubtedly helps the individual with THEIR serve if only because it "feels" comfortable. This naturally is more relaxing which in turn helps any serve by anyone.

papa
12-12-2009, 04:58 AM
papa good observation. coaching mastery comments on the wrist flexion. ithinkit has to do with keeping the racqet face and palm closed on the take back. but i need to look that up

Someone sent me that book several years ago but at the moment I have no idea where it is - probably lent it out. If you find something, I'd be interested in what was said.

papa
12-12-2009, 05:05 AM
Because the serving motion is similar to the throwing motion, this movement of the wrist most likely just comes naturally to the player. It doesn't really help anything in the serve per se, though it undoubtedly helps the individual with THEIR serve if only because it "feels" comfortable. This naturally is more relaxing which in turn helps any serve by anyone.

Your probably right but when I go to throw a ball, I don't flex my wrist like that - then again, until recently, I wasn't aware I was doing it on my serve until someone said "your not teaching us the same motion your using". Somewhat taken back, I guess I wasn't.

And I like your idea about "feeling comfortable" and "relaxing" --- is this something we should be showing everyone or is it in the quirky little habit category like bouncing the ball, pulling at your sleeve, whacking your shoes with the racquet, etc?

mtommer
12-12-2009, 09:16 AM
Your probably right but when I go to throw a ball, I don't flex my wrist like that - then again, until recently, I wasn't aware I was doing it on my serve until someone said "your not teaching us the same motion your using". Somewhat taken back, I guess I wasn't.

Sorry, I should have expounded a little more on that concept. You may not throw like that, but how you do throw is your "natural" way of throwing. You just....throw the ball. So in essence, you're doing the same thing with your serve, you're just "serving".

When pitchers are coached on pitching form, usually the coaching is to straighten out a few flaws of inefficiency BUT the pitchers natural motion is still "kept". Often when pitchers begin to have control problems it's because they're to busy thinking instead of just throwing or some enthusiastic coach took their teaching to far and did change the pitcher's form so that what came naturally to the pitcher before is messed up. So much of athletic performance comes from acting/reacting without thinking.


And I like your idea about "feeling comfortable" and "relaxing" --- is this something we should be showing everyone or is it in the quirky little habit category like bouncing the ball, pulling at your sleeve, whacking your shoes with the racquet, etc?

I wouldn't suggest teaching it. Just relay to the students that what you're teaching them is merely the fundamentals. As they progress they are going to develop their own unique serve technique. Emphasize that the important part right now in their development is to, well, develop I guess. The hard thing is that because some people are more visual oriented they may try copying you anyway. Which is fine really as that may become "their" way too. Just make sure they know that what you do isn't essential to having a good serve.