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MarrratSafin
12-13-2009, 01:24 PM
Hi, does anyone have a checklist for eastern forehand, or any tips for better consistency with the eastern grip? Much appreciated.:) Consistency has been a problem for me lately.:(

Blake0
12-13-2009, 01:42 PM
How do you hit your eastern forehand...over the shoulder, WW? Double bend, straight arm? Where are you most commonly missing, in the net, long, or wide?

Heres some common mistakes.
1.) Shoulder turn. Make sure you turn your shoulder and hips and get set up properly.
2.) Footwork. Are you having to lean to get the ball? Are you off balanced or having to hit balls in odd positions?
3.) Timing. You might be hitting the ball late or too early.
4.) Make sure your nondominant arm is doing its job in the stroke.
5.) Topspin. Make sure you're getting under the ball and hitting through it and not pulling away from the stroke too soon.
6.) Make sure you maintain the hitting arm structure you finish your backswing with all the way till a little after contact before you wrap your arm around your neck/shoulder.
7.) Make sure the wrist is laid back at contact, releasing it too soon causes balls to spray uncontrollably.

Can't think off much else but hope this helps.

CallOfBooty
12-13-2009, 01:47 PM
All things equal with a semi-western/other forehands, the only thing that is really different is the contact point. The more extreme your grip is, the further out your contact point will be. Since you are using an eastern grip, your contact point should be a little later and a little bit more to the side compared to a semi-western grip. The only thing you can do to make an eastern forehand more consistent compared to other grips is to change your contact point. Experiment with swinging later than usual. Keep adjusting your contact point closer to your body in little increments so you won't feel overwhelmed by a big change at one time.

This can also be applied to grip change. It's never too late to change grips. Personally, I switched from semi-western to extreme eastern this past month and I feel better with a later contact point. Sometimes a grip change is the way to go as opposed to adjusting your contact point. I would suggest you try both.

Aside from grips and contact points, the eastern forehand is usually hit flat compared to the other grips. I would suggest you try to hit more underneath the ball and then go up and through it so you can at least get some more topspin on your forehand.

MarrratSafin
12-13-2009, 02:22 PM
How do you hit your eastern forehand...over the shoulder, WW? Double bend, straight arm? Where are you most commonly missing, in the net, long, or wide?

Heres some common mistakes.
1.) Shoulder turn. Make sure you turn your shoulder and hips and get set up properly.
2.) Footwork. Are you having to lean to get the ball? Are you off balanced or having to hit balls in odd positions?
3.) Timing. You might be hitting the ball late or too early.
4.) Make sure your nondominant arm is doing its job in the stroke.
5.) Topspin. Make sure you're getting under the ball and hitting through it and not pulling away from the stroke too soon.
6.) Make sure you maintain the hitting arm structure you finish your backswing with all the way till a little after contact before you wrap your arm around your neck/shoulder.
7.) Make sure the wrist is laid back at contact, releasing it too soon causes balls to spray uncontrollably.

Can't think off much else but hope this helps.

Thanks!:) I finish over the shoulder, with a non-straight arm. Missing long mostly. I do no.5 well enough in fact get under the ball a lot but I believe no.6 is the main problem, I find it hard to maintain the hitting arm structure naturally so if I'm focusing on something else I'll usually lose the structure, and the racquet face may open up slightly or I end up using too much wrist. Footwork is definitely not up to desired standard as well, but others seem fine.

MarrratSafin
12-13-2009, 02:30 PM
All things equal with a semi-western/other forehands, the only thing that is really different is the contact point. The more extreme your grip is, the further out your contact point will be. Since you are using an eastern grip, your contact point should be a little later and a little bit more to the side compared to a semi-western grip. The only thing you can do to make an eastern forehand more consistent compared to other grips is to change your contact point. Experiment with swinging later than usual. Keep adjusting your contact point closer to your body in little increments so you won't feel overwhelmed by a big change at one time.

This can also be applied to grip change. It's never too late to change grips. Personally, I switched from semi-western to extreme eastern this past month and I feel better with a later contact point. Sometimes a grip change is the way to go as opposed to adjusting your contact point. I would suggest you try both.

Aside from grips and contact points, the eastern forehand is usually hit flat compared to the other grips. I would suggest you try to hit more underneath the ball and then go up and through it so you can at least get some more topspin on your forehand.

Thanks.:) I'm already getting under the ball a lot so I get quite a lot of topspin actually. I've tried continental or SW before but they just don't feel natural to me, eastern still feels the best by a lot. So I'll check with my contact point next time. Sometimes it's indeed off due to my footwork.:oops:

Geezer Guy
12-13-2009, 03:05 PM
I hit with an Eastern as well. Be sure you're leaning into your shot (moving forward). I sometimes hit balls long on deep balls that I hit off my back foot. If you're falling backwards you'll hit the ball late with an open face - thus hitting long.

papa
12-13-2009, 04:33 PM
Try to keep your non-racquet hand on the same side until the ball bounces and get that arm straight and as perpendicular to the side fence as possible. You have plenty of time to do this and it gets your shoulders perpendicular to the net. If you do this you'll notice a immediate improvement in your forehand stroke.

Blake0
12-13-2009, 09:46 PM
Thanks!:) I finish over the shoulder, with a non-straight arm. Missing long mostly. I do no.5 well enough in fact get under the ball a lot but I believe no.6 is the main problem, I find it hard to maintain the hitting arm structure naturally so if I'm focusing on something else I'll usually lose the structure, and the racquet face may open up slightly or I end up using too much wrist. Footwork is definitely not up to desired standard as well, but others seem fine.

So you lose your hitting arm structure. Try to think of your arm as one whole unit, swing it as 1 piece and lock the elbow in place. It's something you'll have to get back too.

LuckyR
12-15-2009, 04:01 PM
Well as you have figured out, the bad news is that with your Eastern you are not generating anywhere near as much topspin as your modern FH buddies. Therefore you are vulnerable to hitting long. Those guys tend to think in one dimension, left or right. If you rush the net they can pass you by threading the needle between your lateral reach and the sideline. They don't need to worry about hitting long since their topspin pulls (practically) all of their shots in.

However, you have to think in two dimensions: left or right plus short or deep. The good news is that if you can dial in your depth, your flatter shots will arrive to their side of the court faster and bounce less which can make for a much more difficult to return shot for modern strokes.

LeeD
12-15-2009, 05:13 PM
Getting the shoulders fully turned is the #ONE most important factor. If you have time, naturally a closed stance is called for. Since you hit the ball faster with less effort, you should NOT swing full out every time, or much less often than anyone with SW or W forehand grips.
Sure, you hit with less topspin, so have to be conservative on swingspeed. But then again, you can hit more winners with less expenditure of energy than SW or W forehands......:shock::shock:
Keep posture straight, shoulders closed, racketback early, and feet closed when you have time.
Go CC most of the time.

papa
12-15-2009, 06:17 PM
If you have time, naturally a closed stance is called for.

I would agree with this part but the rest is on the money. Used to be a closed stance was appropriate but times have certainly changed and open stances are being used on both sides more these days on both sides Recovery time is quicker, see the court better and less likely to get wrong footed by the return.

Its not that a closed stance is out, its just not IMO the preferred stance anymore.

LeeD
12-15-2009, 06:25 PM
Again, I"m often wrong, but I thought this thread was for EASTERN GRIP forehands only. For W and SW grips, openstances are great.
For EFH, you can hit with openstance fully turned shoulders, but you will have more accuracy with a closed stance, for passing shots and winners.
The whole concept of openstance hitting is for retrieving, getting, fetching, and hitting MORE balls. When you want to end the point, you would choose to align your feet.

Roy125
12-15-2009, 06:42 PM
4.) Make sure your nondominant arm is doing its job in the stroke.


What does your non dominant arm supposed to do during the forehand?

Blake0
12-15-2009, 07:17 PM
What does your non dominant arm supposed to do during the forehand?

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=298735&highlight=forehand

Post #5 by Bungalo bill should explain it.

marosmith
12-15-2009, 08:01 PM
I hit with an Eastern as well. Be sure you're leaning into your shot (moving forward). I sometimes hit balls long on deep balls that I hit off my back foot. If you're falling backwards you'll hit the ball late with an open face - thus hitting long.

This is the key if you are hitting long, along with unit turn (they should go together).

LeeD
12-16-2009, 09:24 AM
Good posture is very important in every day life and living.
At a bar, the hottie is the one with good posture, awake and alive, ready for reception. :shock::shock: