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Don't Let It Bounce
12-17-2009, 03:51 PM
Do any of the Masters of Esoteric Trivia out there know if Prince's old (I think; I can't find mention of it on current racquets on their web site) CGS was effectively a pallet?

That is, did the racquets come out of a single mold with identical handles, with bigger grip sizes created by thicker cushion grip rubber thingies? Or, were the rubber undergrips of uniform thickness with a different mold for each grip size, like most racquets?

(My ulterior motive in asking: if the former, I hope to alter grip size on valued racquets by hunting down el cheapo cushion-grip racquets with the desired grip size.)

Virginia
12-17-2009, 07:18 PM
Many racquets' grip sizes can be modified, by either building up the handles or shaving them down. I'm not sure about Princes though, but I know some Wilson racquets (like the Profile) can't be shaved down.

Don't Let It Bounce
12-17-2009, 08:32 PM
Yep, there are a few ways to build grips up, and those are available to me. (I've never shaved one down, but I've never needed to and probably never will, knock on graphite.) I'm just wondering if substitution of CGS rubber undergrips is a viable option.

The particulars needn't matter, but: I have 2 big hands and 3 Vortex SB's, grip sizes 3, 4, and 5. I've already built up the #3 and #4 and matched all for wt and balance, but swingweight and grip feel vary–especially on the #3. I wonder if two other Prince rqts with #5 cushion grip systems would solve the puzzle more cleanly.

I know I could slice a couple of my Vortex SB's' grips off and compare them, but before I get all drastic I thought I'd see if anyone else already knows.

Don't Let It Bounce
03-26-2010, 02:56 PM
OK, I finally did this, and encountered some differences between generations of Prince Cushion Grip Systems that someone on TT may someday want to know about.

• The CGS does operate sort of like a pallet. It goes on a hairpin, so the #5 rubber piece is in fact thicker than the #2 rubber piece, and my #5 Vortex SB was therefore heavier than my #3 Vortex SB. (Balance, interestingly, was identical.)

• Wanting two #5 Vortex SB's, I found a #5 CTS Synergy 26 in a secondhand shop and bought it to attempt a transplant. The earlier CTS racquets' cushion grip was slightly different from the later Vortex cushion grip: its buttcap was separate from the rubber piece, while the Vortex's buttcap was integrated into the rubber piece in a sandwiching of layers (rubber = bread, hard plastic of buttcap = cheese).

• I was unable to remove buttcap & grip from the Vortex without separating them; i.e., cutting up the sandwich. If I'd known how they were integrated before getting started, I may have been able to keep the structure intact, but I'm not sure.

• Remove the rubber piece by slicing down the seam. The adhesive isn't too bad, but be especially careful not to tear the grip at the top and bottom. For the buttcap, cutting/removing the staples, placing a screwdriver edge at the top of the buttcap, and gently tapping the screwdriver with a hammer worked fine.

• Switch and reattach buttcaps. Avoid the mistake of sliding the buttcap all the way onto the hairpin handle and gluing, unless you want a shorter racquet than you started with. I did glue the slightly mangled Vortex buttcap onto the Synergy (why waste a racquet, right?), and it is functional if not pretty.

• Switch and attach the rubber pieces. The Synergy hairpin seemed to have a slightly greater circumference than the Vortex (~1 mm), but it wasn't enough to make any difference in how securely the rubber pieces adhered to their new frames or in either racquet's final grip size.

• I used JB Weld epoxy for buttcaps and rubber pieces, to insure that archaeologists of the future are stuck with my modifications. Something less serious would probably be fine for the rubber pieces. Be careful handling the racquet's throat while you're messing with that stuff, though. It's hell to get off.

coachrick
03-26-2010, 03:29 PM
Let me just say that the 'cushion grip system' you speak of ranks as one of the 5 WORST POSSIBLE ANSWERS TO A QUESTION NOBODY ASKED ever, since the beginning of time, without a doubt, no kidding!!!

When that line of rackets was hot('91ish-'93ish), I worked at a club with a VERY active Prince following. The butt caps on those rackets broke at the slightest touch and couldn't be repaired without major surgery or returning the gadowful LIghtning, Graduate, other piece of junk named racket to Prince--making for some VERY unhappy clients. I'm glad you were successful in your quest for a different grip size and I apologize for sugar-coating my response :) .

Don't Let It Bounce
03-26-2010, 05:21 PM
Let me just say that the 'cushion grip system' you speak of ranks as one of the 5 WORST POSSIBLE ANSWERS TO A QUESTION NOBODY ASKED ever, since the beginning of time, without a doubt, no kidding!!!

When that line of rackets was hot('91ish-'93ish), I worked at a club with a VERY active Prince following. The butt caps on those rackets broke at the slightest touch and couldn't be repaired without major surgery or returning the gadowful LIghtning, Graduate, other piece of junk named racket to Prince--making for some VERY unhappy clients. I'm glad you were successful in your quest for a different grip size and I apologize for sugar-coating my response :) .Heh. I bet these were the sandwich types, with rubber pallet and buttcap integrated, like in the Vortex (which did come out in that time period). The older two-piece one (which this Vortex now has) seemed more rugged, but I haven't seen enough of them to know for sure.

Colpo
03-27-2010, 03:20 AM
Way overcushioned. That said, the CGS was of a fixed size. The underframe grip mold varied in size. Hope this helps.