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Klaus
12-29-2009, 10:50 AM
I played a club tournament recently with a bona fide "pusher." I lost the first set 3-6, but realized what I had to do, and trounced my opponent 6-2 in the second set, and was doing the same in the third set at 5-2, up with 30-0 in what would have been the final game. As I was about to serve, (for 40-0) he grabbed his leg and fell to the Court in a dramatic flourish, sitting like cheerleaders from the old days used to sit with both legs curled around them to the right. I ran over to see if he was ok, and he said his leg was injured. I suggested an ice pack, and then asked if he was retiring. He cried "yes," and some of his friends carried him off the court.

He was later seen the next day, playing and moving as if nothing had happened.

WTF? has this ever happened to you? Please explain this phenomena.

JRstriker12
12-29-2009, 10:57 AM
It's called "tanking." LOL! Take pride in your victory, you mashed a pusher so hard he had to duck out to save face (in his mind).

You have to understand the mind of a true pusher - pushers play to "not lose" thus thier strategy is to keep the ball going back until the opponent self destructs.

Once you showed that you could beat his strategy, the only way the pusher figure they could "not lose" is to tank and fake an injury then retire. That way he can claim that he "wasn't really beaten" and he figure it ruins to win for you.

Don't let it ruin your win. There's some strange people on the tennis court. You just beat one of them.

nethawkwenatchee
12-29-2009, 11:23 AM
Very good synopsis "JRstriker12"
You really spoke the truth!

Fearsome Forehand
12-29-2009, 11:24 AM
Retiting sounds like a form of plastic surgery. ;o) I think the OP meant retiring.

Either he had a leg cramp, or simply couldn't stand to lose normally so he went into drama mode. Regardless, a W is a W.

JoelDali
12-29-2009, 11:51 AM
Ha, I know this guy.

:)

Kidding.

I hate pushers!

JavierLW
12-29-2009, 11:53 AM
I played a club tournament recently with a bona fide "pusher." I lost the first set 3-6, but realized what I had to do, and trounced my opponent 6-2 in the second set, and was doing the same in the third set at 5-2, up with 30-0 in what would have been the final game. As I was about to serve, (for 40-0) he grabbed his leg and fell to the Court in a dramatic flourish, sitting like cheerleaders from the old days used to sit with both legs curled around them to the right. I ran over to see if he was ok, and he said his leg was injured. I suggested an ice pack, and then asked if he was retiring. He cried "yes," and some of his friends carried him off the court.

He was later seen the next day, playing and moving as if nothing had happened.

WTF? has this ever happened to you? Please explain this phenomena.

Yes, it means he is a big loser. Congratulations for beating him into submission!

Although usually it's the people playing the pushers who tend to want to pull that.....

Basically sometimes people feel that if they pull out of a match at the last minute in their mind they havent really been beaten. Typically it's the same sort of people who really CANT STAND losing and will sit and mope around after you do beat them.

Ive had this happen to me plenty of times. People suddenly having somewhere to go. People who will "concede" a match if it's tied at a set a piece, and especially if it's even more toward my favor. People who in a timed match will take bathroom breaks knowing full well we wont finish then...

It's actually a very rude thing to do and most of us will actually be insulted when someone pulls this because they are robbing us of being able to finish out the match, but I guess if they go thru the whole trouble of having a fake injury that at least makes you feel better about it. (until you see them playing soon afterwards)

Sometimes pushers who otherwise win a ton of matches against weaker lower level players are like that when they finally lose as well. I had one on my team this year in an actual league match, agree to a DRAW with his opponent after two sets, because after all in his mind if he played that 3rd set he runs the risk of losing and he didnt like his chances...... I was ****ed!!!)

OrangePower
12-29-2009, 11:55 AM
Yeah, my guess would be a cramp. Can hurt like hell, but then goes away pretty quickly afterwards so it's not suspicious that he would be playing again the next day.

Although if I was in that situation, and given the score at the time, I would have played out the match even if all I did was stand there as my opponent aced me twice to end it.

JRstriker12
12-29-2009, 11:59 AM
Yes, it means he is a big loser. Congratulations for beating him into submission!

Although usually it's the people playing the pushers who tend to want to pull that.....

Basically sometimes people feel that if they pull out of a match at the last minute in their mind they havent really been beaten. Typically it's the same sort of people who really CANT STAND losing and will sit and mope around after you do beat them.

(sometimes pushers who otherwise win a ton of matches against weaker lower level players are like that when they finally lose, I had one on my team this year in an actual league match, agree to a DRAW with his opponent after two sets, because after all in his mind if he played that 3rd set he runs the risk of losing and he didnt like his chances...... I was ****ed!!!)


Just wondering - how can you agree to a draw in a tennis match? I really didn't think there was such as thing, especially in most USTA matches.

IMHO - If they guy says, let's call it a draw and retires, he's pulling out of the match and basically loses. Even if the match timed out with a 2 sets a piece and a tied game score, don't they usually play a 1-pt tie breaker or something?

Just wondering.....

JavierLW
12-29-2009, 12:11 PM
Just wondering - how can you agree to a draw in a tennis match? I really didn't think there was such as thing, especially in most USTA matches.

IMHO - If they guy says, let's call it a draw and retires, he's pulling out of the match and basically loses. Even if the match timed out with a 2 sets a piece and a tied game score, don't they usually play a 1-pt tie breaker or something?

Just wondering.....

Exactly, there is no such thing as a draw.

I think realistically if two guys agree to a draw, that's as good as a double default, there is nothing else that's even closer to a draw.

I was really mad, because it's a team event, so it's very inconsiderate to "agree to a draw" when your team is counting on a win. As a team, we'd be far better off if this guy plays and "risks" losing rather then just concede to a draw or whatever.

What ended up happening though is I of course said "WHAT??!! There is no such thing as a draw!!!".

Then I talked to the other captain and explained that they had to finish and they had two options:

1) They either move to some other courts with lights. (the two sets took 2.5 hours because both players were pretty much lobbing the ball back and forth on every point)

2) They need to finish the rest of the match on another day.

The other guy didnt want to go somewhere and keep playing. Apparently it was 830pm and it was his bedtime or something.

He even agreed to concede the match (lose the match), but my first instinct was that "no way, you should finish the match!".

Almost anyone else on my team would of been insulted and they would of felt ripped off if they won by default but of course the pusherguy on my team later said I was stupid for not letting the guy just concede.

Realistically unless you are injured it's a full default if you quit a tennis match. I also figured because my player had first agreed to this silly draw, it wouldnt be fair for us to take the cheap win anyway, and the other captain could have something legitimate to complain about.

(also it's a matter of precedent and a matter of keeping some value in our league, if you have players quitting left and right, that's not cool!)

The earliest he could play was 8 days later on a Sunday morning, so he had to drive all the way across town to our courts again. And he was up 4-1 in the third set but lost 7-5 in a 1.5 long set.

I felt bad for the guy actually, but oh well.... (he even hurt his shoulder in the push-fest, and had to serve out the last couple games underhanded....or he just made himself an excuse, who knows???)

JRstriker12
12-29-2009, 12:16 PM
Exactly, there is no such thing as a draw.

I think realistically if two guys agree to a draw, that's as good as a double default, there is nothing else that's even closer to a draw.

I was really mad, because it's a team event, so it's very inconsiderate to "agree to a draw" when your team is counting on a win. As a team, we'd be far better off if this guy plays and "risks" losing rather then just concede to a draw or whatever.

What ended up happening though is I of course said "WHAT??!! There is no such thing as a draw!!!".

Then I talked to the other captain and explained that they had to finish and they had two options:

1) They either move to some other courts with lights. (the two sets took 2.5 hours because both players were pretty much lobbing the ball back and forth on every point)

2) They need to finish the rest of the match on another day.

The other guy didnt want to go somewhere and keep playing. Apparently it was 830pm and it was his bedtime or something.

He even agreed to concede the match (lose the match), but my first instinct was that "no way, you should finish the match!".

Almost anyone else on my team would of been insulted and they would of felt ripped off if they won by default but of course the pusherguy on my team later said I was stupid for not letting the guy just concede.

Realistically unless you are injured it's a full default if you quit a tennis match. I also figured because my player had first agreed to this silly draw, it wouldnt be fair for us to take the cheap win anyway, and the other captain could have something legitimate to complain about.

(also it's a matter of precedent and a matter of keeping some value in our league, if you have players quitting left and right, that's not cool!)

The earliest he could play was 8 days later on a Sunday morning, so he had to drive all the way across town to our courts again. And he was up 4-1 in the third set but lost 7-5 in a 1.5 long set.

I felt bad for the guy actually, but oh well.... (he even hurt his shoulder in the push-fest, and had to serve out the last couple games underhanded....or he just made himself an excuse, who knows???)

Wow! Just... wow!!!

At least they actually finished out the match. I think you chose the right path. Good call!

Steady Eddy
12-29-2009, 07:19 PM
Yeah, my guess would be a cramp. Can hurt like hell, but then goes away pretty quickly afterwards so it's not suspicious that he would be playing again the next day.

Although if I was in that situation, and given the score at the time, I would have played out the match even if all I did was stand there as my opponent aced me twice to end it.You really think so? I think he realized that he was going to lose, so he faked an injury to save face. He knew it'd look too suspicious to pull that on match point. So he did it on the point just before that. What a poor sport, because, as you say, even if it was an injury, given the score, he should have played it out on not tainted the win.

OrangePower
12-30-2009, 10:46 AM
You really think so? I think he realized that he was going to lose, so he faked an injury to save face. He knew it'd look too suspicious to pull that on match point. So he did it on the point just before that. What a poor sport, because, as you say, even if it was an injury, given the score, he should have played it out on not tainted the win.

My guess is that he really did have a cramp just based on the OP's description of the reaction immediately following and having to be carried off the court. Seems consistent with a cramp. Of course could just be a good piece of acting also... but faking an injury could have been done with much less drama. But yeah he should have played it out anyway so still a poor sport.

Klaus
12-30-2009, 11:55 AM
All I have to do is come here for information. Thanks for the feedback!

I suspected this loser was "tanking" and faking his injury, so now I know this happens to others.

This is also the player that screamed 'SHOW ME THE GREEN!" when he questioned a line call, (and then hooked three of my deep shots), and denied me a bathroom break between sets 2 and 3.

I nominate him for Bad Sportsman of 2009.

I looked up his USTA record just for fun--he's lost almost every match, doubles and singles for the last three years!

Thanks again folks!

JavierLW
12-30-2009, 02:18 PM
and denied me a bathroom break between sets 2 and 3.



How can he deny you a bathroom break?

Is this league play?, if you play a full 3rd set you get a 10 minute break anyway.

(besides that bathroom breaks are perfectly legal)

If they protest that really just becomes their problem and Id let them worry about it....

Sakkijarvi
12-30-2009, 05:11 PM
Without the guy's medical history, or more information, this is too lame for words. Just a bashfest.

Casey10s
12-30-2009, 07:32 PM
I played this guy in a club league several times. Usually he would say he was tired or hurt and at 4-4 all in the set, he would play a few good games to win the set. The last time I played him I figured I would go all out and not leave him get in those 4-4 situations. I was up 6-1, 5-0 and at the changeover, he said he was done and left. I took the win because I beat him both ways, by the score and by not leaving him play his mind games.

Just take it that way, you beat him in the score and you beat him at his game.

Both of these guys appear to be sore losers.

Steady Eddy
12-30-2009, 09:35 PM
Without the guy's medical history, or more information, this is too lame for words. Just a bashfest.Yeah, we don't know. It's possible that he really all-of-a-sudden couldn't play at the 2nd to last point of the match. And also we don't know why Gatorade dropped their Tiger Woods drink line. I mean they said the decision had been made before his scandal broke out. :rolleyes: Sometimes ya gotta connect the dots, especially when they're so close together.

The Vitamin L
12-30-2009, 10:12 PM
Congrats on the win. Maybe he just loves tennis so much he decided to play through his pain the following day? :D

split-step
12-30-2009, 10:22 PM
Not going to lie, I've done it before. :oops:
I was 15 at the time.
I was up 5-0 and my racquet string broke.
I had a different racquet with really old string in it and I used it but my timing was WAY off.
He came back to 5-6 and I 'injured' my thigh stretching for a wide serve.

A decade later I don't care enough about tennis to do something that silly.

Klaus
12-31-2009, 11:16 AM
I have celebrated, with a big steak and a giant libation! it's a W no matter if he "retired" or just stood there and took the loss like a good sportsman would have. Apparently, I heard, it's hard for him to fathom that I've only played for 1.5 years, and he's been playing forever.

Meanwhile, this loser has signed up to be on the same mixed doubles 7.0 team I am on. I get to beat him over and over in practice!

I am sure there will be more drama from him; I will keep you posted. It will be good for some laughs at least.

SoCal has some strange tennis people.

Steady Eddy
01-02-2010, 08:15 AM
I have celebrated, with a big steak and a giant libation! it's a W no matter if he "retired" or just stood there and took the loss like a good sportsman would have. Apparently, I heard, it's hard for him to fathom that I've only played for 1.5 years, and he's been playing forever.
Really? I remember how one summer, a friend and I decided to play tennis every night after work so that by the end of the summer we'd be pretty good. At the end, I signed up for an inter-club event and was just awful. But when I do the math I can see that I still didn't even have 100 hours of practice under my belt. 13 weeks = 91 days. If I played an hour each day that wouldn't be 100 hours, and some days we played for 2 or 3 hours but other days we didn't play at all, so it's reasonable that I hadn't even put in 100 hours on the court. So even in a single 2 hour match I'd do quite a bit of learning!

Given this, how'd you learn to beat an experienced player in just a year and a half? Had you played alot of some other racquet sport, like badminton?

Klaus
01-02-2010, 09:16 PM
For the last 1.5 years, I have taken a lesson or two a week, played in two clinics per week, participated in 2 men's doubles leagues, played about 60 singles matches (losing 4), attended Tennis Camp at University of San Diego, joined a club and pick-up matches at my local public courts. In other words, I worked hard to learn as much as I could in the shortest amount of time. After bout 6 months, I played in the Mixed Doubles tournament at my club, and my partner and I won (3.0). The final match was against this particular loser I beat in singles, and that is partly why he does not care for me. I am a skier since I was 10, played racquetball in 1981-1982 (no lessons, just fooled around), and was a competitive figure skater for five years at an adult level in my early 30s) in the 90s. That's the whole story.

Steady Eddy
01-02-2010, 09:33 PM
For the last 1.5 years, I have taken a lesson or two a week, played in two clinics per week, participated in 2 men's doubles leagues, played about 60 singles matches (losing 4), attended Tennis Camp at University of San Diego, joined a club and pick-up matches at my local public courts. In other words, I worked hard to learn as much as I could in the shortest amount of time. After bout 6 months, I played in the Mixed Doubles tournament at my club, and my partner and I won (3.0). The final match was against this particular loser I beat in singles, and that is partly why he does not care for me. I am a skier since I was 10, played racquetball in 1981-1982 (no lessons, just fooled around), and was a competitive figure skater for five years at an adult level in my early 30s) in the 90s. That's the whole story.Fair enough. Glad to hear that you worked so hard, because if you just took it up and could beat experienced players...then I'd have to hate you. :) Thanks for the reply.

bad_call
01-03-2010, 05:53 AM
Fair enough. Glad to hear that you worked so hard, because if you just took it up and could beat experienced players...then I'd have to hate you. :) Thanks for the reply.

funny post...:lol:

OrangePower
01-03-2010, 02:44 PM
Fair enough. Glad to hear that you worked so hard, because if you just took it up and could beat experienced players...then I'd have to hate you. :) Thanks for the reply.

Haha... off topic, but I know someone who recently got bumped up to 4.5... exactly 3 years after picking up a racquet for the first time. First year, self rated 3.0, bumped to 3.5 at the end of the year. Bumped up to 4.0 at end of year 2, and now 4.5 at end of year 3. And he had never played any racquet sport before either.

Of course it helps that he's a gifted athlete (played DI basketball), and is still young (early 30's). Still, tough not to hate people like that :-)

West Coast Ace
01-03-2010, 03:41 PM
Great story - thanks for sharing. I'm shocked this guy even has friends to help him off the court.