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jmhs
01-01-2010, 08:05 AM
I have read that Pancho Gonzales and Dennis Ralston, among others, said that they played their best when they were angry. I don't even want to mention McEnroe because he was so complex.

I think the idea is that some personality types play better when riled...there's a difference between that kind of edginess and being controlled by anger to the point of playing stupidly and impatiently.

My question is how anger aligns with the Inner Game approach, which is what we are told to strive toward. Maybe I should reread the book, but I can't believe Gallwey would see much positive about playing angry.

Blake0
01-01-2010, 09:01 AM
Some people tend to play more serious when they get mad. Others tend to go "all out" and try to kill every ball. It's really about having the right mind set when you get angry. Control your anger, don't let it control you.

Ripper014
01-01-2010, 09:20 AM
In my youth I found I played better mad... the reason was because my focus got a lot better I also would start to play much more aggressive. But I think the main reason was my focus on the ball.

Larrysümmers
01-01-2010, 08:06 PM
In my youth I found I played better mad... the reason was because my focus got a lot better I also would start to play much more aggressive. But I think the main reason was my focus on the ball.

same here, I seem to see the ball better and I focused on my form better.

jmhs
01-02-2010, 12:02 PM
Tennis isn't war (well..), but I just heard on the History Channel that the Marines and Spartans never enter/entered combat angry. In fact, the Spartans, ruthless though they were, played soothing music to their troops before battle. The idea was to maximize determination. The Marines want their enemies to be angry, which usually leads to bad decisions on the battlefield as it does in tennis.

I agree with the idea that a little anger can sharpen your focus...getting you "into it." The difference is when anger turns negatively emotional.

Larrysümmers
01-02-2010, 02:42 PM
Tennis isn't war (well..), but I just heard on the History Channel that the Marines and Spartans never enter/entered combat angry. In fact, the Spartans, ruthless though they were, played soothing music to their troops before battle. The idea was to maximize determination. The Marines want their enemies to be angry, which usually leads to bad decisions on the battlefield as it does in tennis.

I agree with the idea that a little anger can sharpen your focus...getting you "into it." The difference is when anger turns negatively emotional.

somebody watched the seven deadly sins part 6 i think about anger:twisted:

ManuGinobili
01-04-2010, 01:10 AM
Generally a player's at his/her best when he leaves out the noise (thinking too much, mentally telling his wrist to turn to add more spin...) and focuses purely on execution (with little or no thinking)

Being angry helps clear out the noises leading to more focus on execution, but to be honest I have experienced that it is only momentarily and not sustainable, even counterproductive in some instances. After a few plays your mind would start to lose that focus due to being under great strain (remember angry=stress), and you'd starting sailing balls long again.
The true positive of being angry is it makes you more aggressive, removes barriers and your fear of overhitting (which results in weaker shots), and pushes you to go for more (which can be good or bad loll)

The best approach for me, was actively telling the mind to stay calm and filter out the noise (read The Inner Game Of Tennis way too long ago to be able to claim this method came from the book).
This is extremely goofy, but I read a Japanese swordfighting manga where a master told a student to visualize "the surface of a lake in the autumn"... and it actually worked when I thought of that image in gameplay.

charliefedererer
01-07-2010, 12:02 PM
I don't know about Dennis Ralston, but for Johnny Mac, growing up the son of a New York attorney being combative was his natural state. Ditto for Pancho who couldn't get out of the 7 year contract he signed with Donald Dell to be paid only $10,000/year even though he was the best tennis player in the world, and was called disparingly called "Pancho" because of his Hispanic roots.

But for most of us, being angry will hurt our game, as we use the adrenaline rush to bash the ball too often into the net or long or wide.
Intense focus with controlled agression is the state to strive for.
An ability to forget the last point and "live in the present" focusing on the ball should be our goal.
If your opponent is a reasonable guy, give him the respect to give him your best game. You'll both enjoy a better match.

Zachol82
01-07-2010, 12:16 PM
I have read that Pancho Gonzales and Dennis Ralston, among others, said that they played their best when they were angry. I don't even want to mention McEnroe because he was so complex.

I think the idea is that some personality types play better when riled...there's a difference between that kind of edginess and being controlled by anger to the point of playing stupidly and impatiently.

My question is how anger aligns with the Inner Game approach, which is what we are told to strive toward. Maybe I should reread the book, but I can't believe Gallwey would see much positive about playing angry.

Well, being angry does tend to boost your adrenaline level, therefore you'll feel more powerful and your muscles wont feel fatigue as much.

The only problem is that when a person gets angry, one or more of these things will happen:

1. The tendency to muscle the ball.
2. Muscles will tense/stiffen up, losing its flexibility therefore losing control as well as increasing the chances of getting injured.
3. Losing the ability to think clearly.
4. Did I mention injury?
5. Your opponent sees this as an opportunity, therefore they may become more confident with their shots.
6. You look like an idiot on the court.
7. In many cases, you will swing harder, but your shots will still be slow. This is due to stiffened muscles which results in losing flexibility, as aforementioned. As we all know, flexibility also contributes greatly to strength.
8. If you're a player that hits topspin and relies on racket-head-speed, well that's down the drain now too. Racket-head-speed relies on flexibility for acceleration.
9. You're digging your own grave, since making errors will only anger yourself further, therefore leading to even more anger.
10. You will die of lung cancer.

Slazenger07
01-19-2010, 01:40 PM
playing angry NEVER works for me. When Im playing my best I am sort of spacing out almost, not really focused too much on what Im doing, I am just relaxed and do what I need to do to play great.

halalula1234
01-19-2010, 07:01 PM
playing angry works best for me.. playing relaxed makes me hit crazy errors and out shots.

Zachol82
01-19-2010, 09:08 PM
u wouldnt like me when im mad

No one likes you anyhow <3

GuyClinch
01-20-2010, 06:21 AM
Yeah man those stars prequels stunk.. Its like J.D. Salinger writing another book.. Your thinking - I guess that guy wasn't a genius after all..

Sumo
01-20-2010, 07:03 AM
Well, being angry does tend to boost your adrenaline level, therefore you'll feel more powerful and your muscles wont feel fatigue as much.

The only problem is that when a person gets angry, one or more of these things will happen:

1. The tendency to muscle the ball.
2. Muscles will tense/stiffen up, losing its flexibility therefore losing control as well as increasing the chances of getting injured.
3. Losing the ability to think clearly.
4. Did I mention injury?
5. Your opponent sees this as an opportunity, therefore they may become more confident with their shots.
6. You look like an idiot on the court.
7. In many cases, you will swing harder, but your shots will still be slow. This is due to stiffened muscles which results in losing flexibility, as aforementioned. As we all know, flexibility also contributes greatly to strength.
8. If you're a player that hits topspin and relies on racket-head-speed, well that's down the drain now too. Racket-head-speed relies on flexibility for acceleration.
9. You're digging your own grave, since making errors will only anger yourself further, therefore leading to even more anger.
10. You will die of lung cancer.

You are not describing playing angry, you are describing a complete meltdown.

I play much much better when in a slightly ****ed mode. Mostly because it focuses me on one thing.

DavaiMarat
01-20-2010, 07:12 AM
I have read that Pancho Gonzales and Dennis Ralston, among others, said that they played their best when they were angry. I don't even want to mention McEnroe because he was so complex.

I think the idea is that some personality types play better when riled...there's a difference between that kind of edginess and being controlled by anger to the point of playing stupidly and impatiently.

My question is how anger aligns with the Inner Game approach, which is what we are told to strive toward. Maybe I should reread the book, but I can't believe Gallwey would see much positive about playing angry.

I don't know about being mad but I focus the best when put under duress. Playing with a sense of urgency makes me focus well, not quite tense but not just loosey goosey either. I pretend I'm down 1-3 the entire set or that I'm losing the entire set even if I'm up 4-0. You'll win the set and not even know it happened. On the flip side it's not enjoyable, you won't sit and marvel at your lead or winners. You'll feel like your under pressure like there's always a hole to climb out of.

The biggest problem with me (and I'm sure others as well) is when I get a lead I start getting creative, bravado makes me want to hit bigger, end points faster. Sometimes it works other times I start to misfire. Playing like you're always in the hole negates this. You'll be exhausted mentally though when your done.

DavaiMarat
01-20-2010, 07:13 AM
u wouldnt like me when im mad

Are you related to FedAce?

LuckyR
01-21-2010, 08:24 AM
It is not a suprise that there are players, here and there who play better angry. It is very uncommon, though. Therefore I don't recommend it.

SuperDuy
01-22-2010, 01:41 PM
I play better when I am angry people always say **** about me on the courts and I get pretty mad and I just nail ace after ace,I concentrate more.

imalil2gangsta4u
01-24-2010, 02:16 PM
Ive always played better when im angry. My footwork is horrible when im relaxed.

Steady Eddy
01-24-2010, 06:08 PM
It's best for me if I don't play angry, or play the score, my opponent, or anything like that. I play best if I just play the ball. Just watch the ball, return it, and not care if the rally goes 20 strokes.

dana
01-24-2010, 06:32 PM
I don't play well at all when I'm angry. I get tight, my arms get tense, I don't think well, and I just don't hit the ball well at all. I used to get angry a lot, mostly at the way I was playing, which then caused a downward spiral. After years of working on it, I'm finally getting myself under control so I rarely get angry any more. And I'm having better results too. What a coincidence!