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dthomas
01-02-2010, 07:57 PM
I was wondering how these guys who make it to the finals in these national tournaments are able to play singles and doubles for the entire week? I am 50years old and stay in shape by running at the track twice a week, but I can't imagine playing at a competitive level for an entire week against the best players in the country. If they are playing both singles and doubles, these guys must play two matches a day. How do they do it at without their bodies breaking down during the week? I'm amazed at what they are able to do!

Geezer Guy
01-02-2010, 08:05 PM
Well, for one thing they're playing against a bunch of old guys.:)

joe sch
01-02-2010, 10:10 PM
Roids and bionic joint replacements :)

tennytive
01-03-2010, 08:26 AM
Well, for one thing they're playing against a bunch of old guys.:)


HA. I resemble that remark.

dthomas
01-03-2010, 08:30 PM
I'm wondering how these guys do it for an entire week at the national level? I am a 4.5 player and 50 years old, and I workout twice a week at the track. After playing a tough three set singles match with some of the guys at the club, I am sore the next day. I am wondering how these good senior tournament players can do it for an entire week? When I workout out at the track, I am running 5 x 100 meter sprints and 5 x 200 meter sprints, along with 5 laps of jogging to warm-up, so I am in excellent shape. I normal play guys that are younger than me, and I normally tire them out. I don't play tournaments, but I do have an interest in playing in the future as I get closer to retirement and my kids are grown and gone, so I am just curious to know how they do it. Are there any good senior tournaments players out there???

Dave Mc
01-04-2010, 06:19 AM
I play those senior national category-I occasionally, and I can tell you that the top guys can play singles and doubles the entire tournament because they can "coast" through the first 3 or 4 rounds without much effort. The top guys are usually former ATP players, former Davis Cup players, and former top NCAA D-I players, and it's just a walk in the park for them against all the 4.5 and 5.0 level seniors that fill out the draw.

dthomas
01-04-2010, 12:06 PM
Thanks! They must really be good players to beat 4.5 and 5.0 players that easy.

joe sch
01-04-2010, 10:45 PM
I play those senior national category-I occasionally, and I can tell you that the top guys can play singles and doubles the entire tournament because they can "coast" through the first 3 or 4 rounds without much effort. The top guys are usually former ATP players, former Davis Cup players, and former top NCAA D-I players, and it's just a walk in the park for them against all the 4.5 and 5.0 level seniors that fill out the draw.

That is the truth.
It use to be more that way on the pro tours and I would say today, there is a much deeper field such that early round tournament matches are no longer warmups for the top players and upsets are much more common.

dthomas
01-05-2010, 12:06 PM
I live just a few miles away from a small town called Hanford, California, where a guy named Graydon Nichols lives, who is 83 years old. He started played the senior tournaments in northern California when he was in his 50's, and is still playing in them today. He wasn't the top player when he started playing, but he kept improving his ranking throughout the years. Just a few years ago at the age of 80, he became the number player in the world in the 80's for singles. His story is quite amazing, and it proves that if a person can stay healthy and fit anything is possible. Even at 83, he made it to the finals of the national 80's singles on grass this summer.

Kick_It
01-05-2010, 10:28 PM
I wouldn't know; I've only made it to day 3 ;-) I could probably tell you how _not_ to do it, but that wasn't what you asked.

Dave Mc is right - the players who go 5 or 6 days deep in these tourneys are true world class players like Rick Leach who won 40s clay courts a couple years ago.

Dave Mc
01-06-2010, 06:17 AM
He wasn't the top player when he started playing, but he kept improving his ranking throughout the years. Just a few years ago at the age of 80, he became the number player in the world in the 80's for singles.

LOL, That's going to be my new plan! In M45S, I've got a sectional ranking and US ranking, but I've come to realize that I'll never improve to the point where I could actually beat the guys ranked above me. So my new goal is to OUT LIVE the competition, and someday become #1 in US in M95S by default =-) .... excuse me... more prune juice, please? =-)

everett
01-06-2010, 06:19 AM
I am interested in playing a national 50 this year as well. I have the same concern. Three of the guys I play with have rarely played in nationals but entered last year and all got to either the semis or quarters of both doubles and singles. They all had long matches throughout all stages of the tourney. All three were torn up afterward. Leg problems, arm problems, etc. It took them quite some time to get over it. One guy suffered for months and is still not back to 100%.

However, I know another guy nearly 65(one of the best in the world), that plays all the tourneys, and has no problem. I have seen him play 3 or 4 matches in a day. He is a superhuman freak.

Maybe if you play a lot of tournaments, you get used to the conditioning and the wear that it takes and it makes it easier. I will probably pass on entering unless I get in better physical shape and play more.

dthomas
01-06-2010, 05:18 PM
Dave, please pass the prune juice my way too. My mother is 81 years old and is very healthy. She lives in Minnesota and still shovels her own snow like it's a walk in the park. I hope I can stay as healthy as she is when I'm in my 80's. She doesn't play tennis, but she does cross country ski. She is an amazing lady!

Spinz
01-07-2010, 05:06 AM
You can mark me in the column of people who played and were torn up afterward. I have been injured for months following a few cat I and II tournaments last year. I did have a good time playing them however.

Spinz
01-07-2010, 05:07 AM
LOL, That's going to be my new plan! In M45S, I've got a sectional ranking and US ranking, but I've come to realize that I'll never improve to the point where I could actually beat the guys ranked above me. So my new goal is to OUT LIVE the competition, and someday become #1 in US in M95S by default =-) .... excuse me... more prune juice, please? =-)

I think that too. Senior tennis players are the only group of the population who actually want to age up!

Spinz
01-07-2010, 05:08 AM
Well, maybe we dont want to age up. We just want more time to improve. That said, I think I'm going to lose to the same people well into the 90s if I'm lucky enough to make it there.

Spinz
01-07-2010, 05:09 AM
I live just a few miles away from a small town called Hanford, California, where a guy named Graydon Nichols lives, who is 83 years old. He started played the senior tournaments in northern California when he was in his 50's, and is still playing in them today. He wasn't the top player when he started playing, but he kept improving his ranking throughout the years. Just a few years ago at the age of 80, he became the number player in the world in the 80's for singles. His story is quite amazing, and it proves that if a person can stay healthy and fit anything is possible. Even at 83, he made it to the finals of the national 80's singles on grass this summer.

He is definitely an inspiration. That is a very nice family and the sport of tennis is lucky to have them involved.

mntlblok
01-07-2010, 06:22 PM
I play those senior national category-I occasionally, and I can tell you that the top guys can play singles and doubles the entire tournament because they can "coast" through the first 3 or 4 rounds without much effort. The top guys are usually former ATP players, former Davis Cup players, and former top NCAA D-I players, and it's just a walk in the park for them against all the 4.5 and 5.0 level seniors that fill out the draw.

At 56, I've about given up on entering the singles draws. Way too lazy to get into the kind of shape necessary to compete in the heat, especially since there's no chance of getting past a round or two in the bigger tournaments. I have tons of respect for the guys who put in the "hard yards" at this age and above.

If you look at the results in the draws, you find no shortage of "retirings" due to injury throughout the events. And, a lot of these tournaments are played on clay, so singles often ends up being more like a marathon race than a tennis match. Once you get to the 55's the number of 5.0 and above players drops off rather quickly.

I can come a lot closer to being in good enough shape to compete in the doubles, though the heat can *still* be a problem at times. It *is* a blast to get to hang out with some of these great players and to get to know them a bit. And, even if you get the tar beat out of you, you get a chance to see how you stack up against some of these "legends". :-)

Kevin

rasajadad
01-08-2010, 07:17 AM
At this age, it's all about the wheels AND the ability to play two-a-days. (I unfortunately posess neither!)

mntlblok
01-09-2010, 07:30 AM
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/tournamenthome/applicants.aspx?M=A&T=85975

Check out the 55's singles of this upcoming Florida tournament. Somebody else also pointed out that there is a "Jerry West" among the applicants.

Kevin

mntlblok
01-09-2010, 09:16 AM
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/tournamenthome/applicants.aspx?M=A&T=85975

Check out the 55's singles of this upcoming Florida tournament. Somebody else also pointed out that there is a "Jerry West" among the applicants.

Kevin

And someone else pointed out that there's a Lawrence Taylor entered.

But, now I'm having to wonder if Roscoe forgot how to spell his name. . .

Kevin

mntlblok
02-03-2010, 05:21 AM
And someone else pointed out that there's a Lawrence Taylor entered.

But, now I'm having to wonder if Roscoe forgot how to spell his name. . .

Kevin
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalblock/4327116837/in/photostream/
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/Draws/EventDraw.aspx?T=83769&E=1&D=M&S=F

Turns out that it *was* Roscoe, and he also played the following week in the Cat. II tournament in Naples. He was as gracious with everyone as could be and a good sport in his matches as well. It was great having him in the tournament.

Kevin

J_R_B
02-03-2010, 05:53 AM
Who is King Van Nostrand? If you look at his tournament record, he only lost one freakin game in the whole tournament and has only lost as many as 2 games in a set once in the last year. He was playing in 75's. Is he a former pro?

And from the results, there are a couple telling things about these senior tounies. First, there are a bunch of injury defaults in the later rounds (quarters, semis, etc...). Second, most times, when someone plays a 3 setter, he loses the next match (this is what happened to Roscoe). So, it looks like these guys are less about superhuman recovery and more likely to take advantage of easier matches to get through.

mntlblok
02-03-2010, 08:19 AM
Who is King Van Nostrand? If you look at his tournament record, he only lost one freakin game in the whole tournament and has only lost as many as 2 games in a set once in the last year. He was playing in 75's. Is he a former pro?

And from the results, there are a couple telling things about these senior tournies. First, there are a bunch of injury defaults in the later rounds (quarters, semis, etc...). Second, most times, when someone plays a 3 setter, he loses the next match (this is what happened to Roscoe). So, it looks like these guys are less about superhuman recovery and more likely to take advantage of easier matches to get through.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalblock/4322234126/in/set-72157623326551124/
King is a legend. I watched some of his play last week. Moves like a teenager and never misses. A lot of the matches that end up with lopsided scores are actually pretty darn good battles. It's just hard to win points against people like King or Jimmy Parker in the 65's. You can learn a lot watching these guys. It's just *so* hard to win a point against them.

As to what happened to Roscoe, he did have a tough three setter against a very good 55's player the previous day, but I don't see him beating Fred Robinson any time soon, no matter what he did the day before. Fred is number one in the country and 5 in the world currently. http://www.itftennis.com/seniors/players/player.asp?player=40009891 I watched some of his match with Roscoe. I also got a chance to taste Fred's lefty forehand coming at me at high speed in doubles. :mrgreen:

Kevin

mntlblok
04-13-2010, 01:39 PM
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalblock/4327116837/in/photostream/
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/Draws/EventDraw.aspx?T=83769&E=1&D=M&S=F

Turns out that it *was* Roscoe, and he also played the following week in the Cat. II tournament in Naples. He was as gracious with everyone as could be and a good sport in his matches as well. It was great having him in the tournament.

Kevin

I kept wondering what it was that got Roscoe out to play with us. Still not sure, but this might be a hint; from the Bocage tournament this week in Baton Rouge:
ROSCOE TANNER TO PLAY MENS 55 & BOOK SIGNING FRIDAY EVENING
Roscoe Tanner will play in the mens 55 division of this years tournament. He reached a career-high world singles ranking of No. 4 in 1979. He serve was clocked at 153 mph at Palm Springs in 1978 during a match against Raul Ramirez. Tanner defeated Guillermo Vilas in three straight sets in the 1977 Australian Open final to win his first and only grand slam title. Tanner lost a five-setter to Bjorn Borg in the 1979 Wimbledon final.
Roscoe will also be signing copies of his book Double Fault: My Rise And Fall, And My Road Back! on Friday evening April 16 during the tournament.

Kevin

darrinbaker00
04-13-2010, 11:10 PM
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalblock/4327116837/in/photostream/
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/Draws/EventDraw.aspx?T=83769&E=1&D=M&S=F

Turns out that it *was* Roscoe, and he also played the following week in the Cat. II tournament in Naples. He was as gracious with everyone as could be and a good sport in his matches as well. It was great having him in the tournament.

Kevin
Roscoe Tanner is a free man again? When did that happen?

atatu
04-14-2010, 08:23 AM
I'm heading to Bocage tonight (6 hour drive) I'll let you know how Roscoe looks...luckily I'm not in his draw...

EP1998
04-14-2010, 09:00 AM
I'm heading to Bocage tonight (6 hour drive) I'll let you know how Roscoe looks...luckily I'm not in his draw...

Good luck and let us know how the tournament goes! Now that you've had to buy all white maybe you should plan a trip to the grass.

mntlblok
04-14-2010, 09:33 AM
Good luck and let us know how the tournament goes! Now that you've had to buy all white maybe you should plan a trip to the grass.

They handed out shirts with no collars at both tournaments I've played in that required all whites/collared shirts. :)

Which draw *are* you in, atatu?

Kevin

EP1998
04-14-2010, 09:42 AM
They handed out shirts with no collars at both tournaments I've played in that required all whites/collared shirts. :)

Which draw *are* you in, atatu?

Kevin

That's funny!

This looks like a good event - some great potential matches on tap if the seeds hold.

mntlblok
04-14-2010, 10:13 AM
This looks like a good event - some great potential matches on tap if the seeds hold.

Which age groups are you most familiar with? Do you play some of the senior tournaments?

Kevin
Savannah

EP1998
04-14-2010, 11:59 AM
Which age groups are you most familiar with? Do you play some of the senior tournaments?

Kevin
Savannah

I have played some and hope to play more in the future. They are a lot of fun. I'm actually familar with a lot of the age groups! In this one I think the potential matchup in men's 40 will be interesting. I am familiar with Eion and he is big lefty while Oren is quite the wily competitor I have heard. The men's 55s with Roscoe in the draw will be interesting also. I am pulling for Phil L to win that one. The women's draws tend to be quite small in this event but I think in the 45s the final will be Myke Loomis and Kathy Vick.

GRANITECHIEF
04-14-2010, 12:37 PM
I recently played Eion and can confirm that he is a big lefty, with a nasty serve/volley and a great 2 hand backhand service return.
I didn't see the 40's draw on the link above.

atatu
04-14-2010, 12:43 PM
They handed out shirts with no collars at both tournaments I've played in that required all whites/collared shirts. :)

Which draw *are* you in, atatu?

Kevin

I'm in the 45's singles and 40's doubles...or should I say the 45's consolation draw and the 40 doubles. "Good" news is that in doubles our opponents pulled out, so we are in the quarterfinals...bad news is we play the #2 seeds.....

EP1998
04-14-2010, 12:47 PM
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/Draws/EventDraw.aspx?T=84578&E=3

This thread started with discussing another event and then switched to Bocage hence the confusion!

mntlblok
04-14-2010, 01:48 PM
I have played some and hope to play more in the future. They are a lot of fun. I'm actually familar with a lot of the age groups! In this one I think the potential matchup in men's 40 will be interesting. I am familiar with Eion and he is big lefty while Oren is quite the wily competitor I have heard. The men's 55s with Roscoe in the draw will be interesting also. I am pulling for Phil L to win that one. The women's draws tend to be quite small in this event but I think in the 45s the final will be Myke Loomis and Kathy Vick.

I've seen Oren play. Was shocked to see anyone seeded ahead of him.

Met Phil L a couple of years ago at the 55's clay courts. Some of the big names don't tend to be particularly approachable, but he was as nice as he could be. I had seen his amazing record and was expecting to see a monster of some sort, yet he's very "average" looking. My sense was that his concentration level may be "Tiger-like", though.

At least there *is* a women's draw. Too often, the women's draws don't "make". New use of the term for me that I've learned recently at tournaments. :)

I note that the 60's hard courts is also going on now out in California. I've become a fan of Brent Abel. Might get interesting with him and Brian Cheney and Larry Turville.
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/TournamentHome/Tournament.aspx?T=82103

Kevin

GRANITECHIEF
04-15-2010, 12:54 PM
I would be shocked to see any seeded ahead of Eoin. And i see that he didn't lose any games in his first match. Not surprising.

bad_call
04-15-2010, 02:30 PM
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/tournamenthome/applicants.aspx?M=A&T=85975

Check out the 55's singles of this upcoming Florida tournament. Somebody else also pointed out that there is a "Jerry West" among the applicants.

Kevin

i played a Jerry West in FL many years back. can't find him in the link you provided.

mntlblok
04-15-2010, 03:38 PM
i played a Jerry West in FL many years back. can't find him in the link you provided.

Hmmm. . . Try this one: http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/tournamenthome/players.aspx?T=83769

Kevin

bad_call
04-15-2010, 04:05 PM
Hmmm. . . Try this one: http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/tournamenthome/players.aspx?T=83769

Kevin

thanks...looks to be the same gent. he was ranked up there in FL in his age group way back when. great that he's still playing. not sure if i'll make it to that group at the current level of aches and pains.

do u know him?

darrinbaker00
04-15-2010, 10:46 PM
I'm in the 45's singles and 40's doubles...or should I say the 45's consolation draw and the 40 doubles. "Good" news is that in doubles our opponents pulled out, so we are in the quarterfinals...bad news is we play the #2 seeds.....
Congratulations on making the quarters in singles as well.

GRANITECHIEF
04-16-2010, 11:32 AM
Oren looks like he had a bit of a battle.

atatu
04-16-2010, 03:12 PM
Congratulations on making the quarters in singles as well.

Thanks, I got smoked today by Paul Wagner who is a teaching pro in Dallas. We were at 2-2 and I lost 10 straight games ! He was too good and once I fell behind I started going for too much. Oren had a battle with a guy from Chile named Alfredo Rivera, great match. I saw a little bit of Tanner's match today, his serve doesn't seem that fast to me, but his old school groundstokes were pinpoint accurate. The incongruous thing to me is that he was wearing "skechers" tennis shoes....I'll post some pics later..

darrinbaker00
04-16-2010, 05:36 PM
Thanks, I got smoked today by Paul Wagner who is a teaching pro in Dallas. We were at 2-2 and I lost 10 straight games ! He was too good and once I fell behind I started going for too much. Oren had a battle with a guy from Chile named Alfredo Rivera, great match. I saw a little bit of Tanner's match today, his serve doesn't seem that fast to me, but his old school groundstokes were pinpoint accurate. The incongruous thing to me is that he was wearing "skechers" tennis shoes....I'll post some pics later..
1. Ten games in a row? OUCH!!

2. Maybe Skechers is the only shoe company that will take a check from ol' Roscoe. ;)

EP1998
04-17-2010, 12:27 PM
Thanks, I got smoked today by Paul Wagner who is a teaching pro in Dallas. We were at 2-2 and I lost 10 straight games ! He was too good and once I fell behind I started going for too much. Oren had a battle with a guy from Chile named Alfredo Rivera, great match. I saw a little bit of Tanner's match today, his serve doesn't seem that fast to me, but his old school groundstokes were pinpoint accurate. The incongruous thing to me is that he was wearing "skechers" tennis shoes....I'll post some pics later..

good job that you won your first round and sounds like you started well in your second against a tough player. How do you like the tournament?

EP1998
04-17-2010, 12:34 PM
Collins is cruising through the draw. Motevassal might be wearing himself out playing two age groups plus tough match already. Should be interesting though in the final. Score not up yet for Phil v. Roscoe.

EP1998
04-17-2010, 12:41 PM
I've seen Oren play. Was shocked to see anyone seeded ahead of him.

Met Phil L a couple of years ago at the 55's clay courts. Some of the big names don't tend to be particularly approachable, but he was as nice as he could be. I had seen his amazing record and was expecting to see a monster of some sort, yet he's very "average" looking. My sense was that his concentration level may be "Tiger-like", though.

At least there *is* a women's draw. Too often, the women's draws don't "make". New use of the term for me that I've learned recently at tournaments. :)

I note that the 60's hard courts is also going on now out in California. I've become a fan of Brent Abel. Might get interesting with him and Brian Cheney and Larry Turville.
http://tennislink.usta.com/tournaments/TournamentHome/Tournament.aspx?T=82103

Kevin


Brent is a super nice guy. I noticed he lost today though. That age group looks tough. Larry Turville whips everyone I think! It will be interesting to see how he goes with Brian Cheney if that ends up being the final. The score for Phil and Roscoe isn't up yet but I am definitely curious about that one.

mntlblok
04-17-2010, 01:47 PM
Brent is a super nice guy. I noticed he lost today though. That age group looks tough. Larry Turville whips everyone I think! It will be interesting to see how he goes with Brian Cheney if that ends up being the final. The score for Phil and Roscoe isn't up yet but I am definitely curious about that one.

Brent's blog pointed out that Newman and Turville lost in three in the doubles. That almost *never* happens. I'll blame the hard courts.

My money's on Phil in his match with Roscoe. Reynard is a *horse* in the finals, though. . .

Kevin

Enlightened Coelacanth
04-17-2010, 04:56 PM
Brent is a super nice guy. I noticed he lost today though. That age group looks tough. Larry Turville whips everyone I think! It will be interesting to see how he goes with Brian Cheney if that ends up being the final. The score for Phil and Roscoe isn't up yet but I am definitely curious about that one.Brent is a very knowledgeable proponent of the all court game (an "anachronistic" concept :), automatically tipping you off as to his age, if you didn't know better) and his advice for the aggressive net player is sound and wise.

EP1998
04-18-2010, 01:01 PM
Brent is a very knowledgeable proponent of the all court game (an "anachronistic" concept :), automatically tipping you off as to his age, if you didn't know better) and his advice for the aggressive net player is sound and wise.

Yes he is very smart and a good communicator too. I think there are a lot of advantages to learning an all court game because it forces players to think and plan to some extent versus mindless ball bashing. I enjoy watching high level seniors tennis for this very reason. Some of matches are amazing with cat and mouse tennis and points that use the whole court.

Enlightened Coelacanth
04-18-2010, 02:12 PM
Yes he is very smart and a good communicator too. I think there are a lot of advantages to learning an all court game because it forces players to think and plan to some extent versus mindless ball bashing. I enjoy watching high level seniors tennis for this very reason. Some of matches are amazing with cat and mouse tennis and points that use the whole court.As it turns out, after reading one of his blogs, he was a disciple of legendary coach Tom Stow (who I had the pleasure of meeting a couple of times before his death) as I was getting into tennis, relatively late in life.

And some of the people that trained as disciples of Stow (Steve Stefanki, Doug King, etc.) I developed pretty good relationships with here in this little tennis oasis, Napa Valley.
And some of the crazy training methods he (Able) describes Stow using on the young players shows up in the Stefanki method (which I still think are crazy, and used to greatly irk me:) ).

But his advocacy of continental grips (over extreme eastern topspin grips) and the use of slice and short shots to draw opponents to net, or take the net yourself (the absolute best place to be on a tennis court geometrically) still seems like golden advice to me for all but the very highest levels of those in the tennis food chain (and, like Stow follower Larry Stefanki has shown with Andy Roddick, even at the greatest heights his methods can work well with someone willing to try).

Brent is not in my neck of the Nor Cal woods, but I may try to drop in this summer in Moraga (where I believe he resides) to try and tap into some of that sweet knowledge he puts to good use in the nationals.

atatu
04-18-2010, 02:35 PM
good job that you won your first round and sounds like you started well in your second against a tough player. How do you like the tournament?

I had a great time ! The club was very nice and the crawfish boil on Saturday night was a lot of fun. I watched several great matches and there was a challenger going on at the same time in Baton Rouge so we even saw some pro tennis. Roscoe got worn down by Phil L., that guy was tough. Tanner still has the low toss, by the way...

atatu
04-18-2010, 02:36 PM
http://i44.tinypic.com/rbcpat.jpg

EP1998
04-18-2010, 02:43 PM
I was going to mention Tom Stow but his name escaped me when I was writing the post! He must have been quite the legend.

If I were in Norcal I'd definitely arrange some on court time with Bret. I completely agree that style of tennis can be very effective, especially on the California hard courts. It is a good option for players who get nervous easily also. There is no time to think and you have to keep moving. In a long groundstroke rally, the mind can start entering the picture and complicating everything. If the player gets nervous, the feet stop moving and its difficult to get going again. With the net rush, there is no time for this. The frustrating thing about net rushing though is how much practice time it takes. I feel like I need at least an hour on volleys alone, never mind the approach shots!

You're lucky to live in Napa by the way.

EP1998
04-18-2010, 02:46 PM
I had a great time ! The club was very nice and the crawfish boil on Saturday night was a lot of fun. I watched several great matches and there was a challenger going on at the same time in Baton Rouge so we even saw some pro tennis. Roscoe got worn down by Phil L., that guy was tough. Tanner still has the low toss, by the way...

Awesome, I might plan on this for next year.

Roscoe's shoes are interesting!!!!!

Enlightened Coelacanth
04-18-2010, 03:20 PM
I was going to mention Tom Stow but his name escaped me when I was writing the post! He must have been quite the legend.I wish I appreciated him more while he was here running the tennis program at Silverado CC. But you know what wishes are good for :( .
He was sort of like the American Harry Hopman.

If I were in Norcal I'd definitely arrange some on court time with Bret. I completely agree that style of tennis can be very effective, especially on the California hard courts. It is a good option for players who get nervous easily also. There is no time to think and you have to keep moving. In a long groundstroke rally, the mind can start entering the picture and complicating everything. If the player gets nervous, the feet stop moving and its difficult to get going again. With the net rush, there is no time for this. The frustrating thing about net rushing though is how much practice time it takes. I feel like I need at least an hour on volleys alone, never mind the approach shots!If it weren't for volleys, I wouldn't play tennis at all! :). And when you are committed to a strategy of taking the net away from the opponent, it eliminates all confusing strategy decisions. It's great.

As I say, I came to tennis later in life and learned to volley at the end of my learning process (in Sacramento, from a pro who has won some national singles titles, so I got lucky).
Volleying is a very minimalist stroke. Most people screw it up by making it more complicated than it is. You only need to know three simple things.

A) The grip is essential. It must be continental because there is no time to switch around when people are blasting shots at you from short range. All volleys are hit straight through the ball, with moderate underspin. DO NOT exaggerate the "chopping down" motion of the volley. This is how Roddick used to volley and all you do is kill all the pace of your ball and make it pop up for the other guy to murder.

B) NO BACKSWING! I can't stress this too much. You will not be able to volley properly if you take the racquet back even a little. Everything is out in front of you (hands, ball, etc.) so keep it simple.
You get your hands up and in front of you and all you have to do is turn your hand over (backhand volley) or wrist "up" (or exposed) to hit a forehand volley. That's it.

C)You actually volley with your feet, like a boxer delivering a punch. You see the path of the ball, set your racquet in front of it, then pivot on your forehand or backhand foot, and simply step into the ball. That's it! It's that simple.

You're lucky to live in Napa by the way.Sometimes I wonder if I am. It's wonderful if you are a grape though (sorry to get carried away with the impromptu tutorial).

mntlblok
04-18-2010, 03:37 PM
thanks...looks to be the same gent. he was ranked up there in FL in his age group way back when. great that he's still playing. not sure if i'll make it to that group at the current level of aches and pains.

do u know him?

Nope. Was just noticing all the familiar names.

Kevin

tennis tom
04-19-2010, 08:55 AM
If you want more by Tom Stow, you can get "THE TOM STOW TENNIS TEACHING SYSTEM AND STROKE DEVELOPER".
It's a 50 page booklet available from Brent Abel.

jean pierre
04-19-2010, 10:35 AM
Players over 50, like McEnroe, Vilas, Borg, Bahrami : what level ?

EP1998
04-19-2010, 04:01 PM
Nope. Was just noticing all the familiar names.

Kevin

You were right about Reynard. They had a heck of a match from looking at the scoreline!

EP1998
04-19-2010, 04:01 PM
Great post about the volley techniques!

EP1998
04-19-2010, 04:02 PM
If you want more by Tom Stow, you can get "THE TOM STOW TENNIS TEACHING SYSTEM AND STROKE DEVELOPER".
It's a 50 page booklet available from Brent Abel.

Sounds great, thanks!