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gino
01-03-2010, 09:40 PM
Hey everyone,
I was wondering if any of you can help me in my college search, my top two schools of interest are Loyola Marymount and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

Both are division I programs and I was wondering if anyone could help me in getting a spot on the team at either of these schools.

I'm a 16 year old junior.. here is a little about me from my last thread:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOEw8mcW7Y4

I am a junior this year at De La Salle High School and I have improved my tennis dramatically in the past few years. I am 5 feet 7 inches, I play with a semi western forehand, one handed backhand, solid fitness, and big serve. I am an all court player with solid volleys off both sides and doubles experience. I have been playing tennis since age 11.

I am ranked 153 in northern california and 2014 nationally in boy's 18 singles. I realize that my rankings are low but I have just moved up to 18's.

WARPWOODIE
01-04-2010, 10:33 AM
Not being really familiar with the process...but I was looking at the TRN recruiting stars for both schools. Loyola is picking up a one (1) star for next year, therefore, you should have a chance as you continue to play more tournaments in the next two years and raising your TRN rating. Good luck!

ClarkC
01-04-2010, 05:06 PM
Not being really familiar with the process...but I was looking at the TRN recruiting stars for both schools. Loyola is picking up a one (1) star for next year, therefore, you should have a chance as you continue to play more tournaments in the next two years and raising your TRN rating. Good luck!

People need to understand something about the TRN lists. Any kid with a page on TRN can gain admittance to a school and then list that school as his commitment. This says nothing about whether he will be on the team, whether he is ever going to get any playing time or scholarship money, whether he will even be allowed to try out as a walk-on, or whether the coach has even heard of him.

Look at the 2007 list of commitments to Virginia. Four players: Three of the top recruits in the country, and a one star who never enrolled at the school as far as I know.

If you want to gauge your chances at a school, look at their matches, particularly their close matches or losing matches, when they probably fielded their best lineup. Or look at the final stat summary for the whole season. Then compare your self to the players who actually played.

Tennishacker
01-06-2010, 12:11 PM
Hey Gino,
I hate to break it to you but your ranking is way to low for those two schools.
Stop dreaming and focus on a D3 school. With your ranking, it would be a close call getting on to a D3 tennis team.
My trn ranking is in the high 200's, Im just hoping to play or walk onto a D3 team.
Loyola has a ton of foreign players, probably played pro tennis, and cal poly has guys like andre dome on the team.

Good luck Gino

gino
01-07-2010, 12:15 AM
Hey Gino,
I hate to break it to you but your ranking is way to low for those two schools.
Stop dreaming and focus on a D3 school. With your ranking, it would be a close call getting on to a D3 tennis team.
My trn ranking is in the high 200's, Im just hoping to play or walk onto a D3 team.
Loyola has a ton of foreign players, probably played pro tennis, and cal poly has guys like andre dome on the team.

Good luck Gino

Thanks.

But check your facts before you shoot me down buddy. Loyola has a senior with a lower ranking than me and the same tennisrecruiting.net star rating committed for next season. That PROVES it's possible.

Gino

DNShade
01-07-2010, 12:28 AM
Gino,

I went to Loyola and grew up in SLO and know the coach at Poly a bit. I'll see what I can find out for you the next time I see or talk to either of the coaches or anyone else from the departments.

gino
01-07-2010, 09:58 AM
Gino,

I went to Loyola and grew up in SLO and know the coach at Poly a bit. I'll see what I can find out for you the next time I see or talk to either of the coaches or anyone else from the departments.

really? that would be awesome DNShade! Thanks so much, keep me posted
:)

Nick K10
01-07-2010, 02:20 PM
Hey im Gino's doubles partner Nick and the kid really wants to play college tennis and trys harder then anyone i know to make this possible. Could more people please offer him some good advice.:) He really deserves it

gino
01-07-2010, 02:50 PM
Hey im Gino's doubles partner Nick and the kid really wants to play college tennis and trys harder then anyone i know to make this possible. Could more people please offer him some good advice.:) He really deserves it

thanks bro! i want a spot on one of these teams more than anywhere else.
thanks for all the advice guys.

gino

ClarkC
01-07-2010, 05:12 PM
Thanks.

But check your facts before you shoot me down buddy. Loyola has a senior with a lower ranking than me and the same tennisrecruiting.net star rating committed for next season. That PROVES it's possible.

Gino

Does this senior play?

Did you bother to read my post earlier in this thread and investigate the situation?

It looks to me like their previous 1-star recruit is about their #6 guy, part-time.

papatenis
01-07-2010, 07:42 PM
Hello Gino,

From reading your posts, you seem be a nice kid.
I know that college counselors advise that you apply to at least 10 colleges. You should have your reaches, safety schools, and schools which you should have no problems getting into.
You should do the same with schools that you want to play tennis at. Don't limit yourself to just two schools.

Best of luck!

Bash and Crash
01-07-2010, 09:44 PM
Gino, just get cranking in your tourneys and get that ranking up where the coaches like to see it and beat some of the top guys in your local high school matches, Shaun and Chris at Monte Vista, Allen at Cal high among others. Don't compare your stats, just post your solid numbers and make it happen.

gino
01-09-2010, 01:50 PM
[QUOTE=Bash and Crash;4256845]Gino, just get cranking in your tourneys and get that ranking up where the coaches like to see it and beat some of the top guys in your local high school matches, Shaun and Chris at Monte Vista, Allen at Cal high among others. Don't compare your stats, just post your solid numbers and make it happen.[/QUOTE

thanks for the reply, ill get on it.
chris and allen are friends of mine, chris played on our team freshman year and now he and shaun are just demolishing NorCal. Thanks for the advice and ill keep you all updated :)

gino
01-09-2010, 01:52 PM
Does this senior play?

Did you bother to read my post earlier in this thread and investigate the situation?

It looks to me like their previous 1-star recruit is about their #6 guy, part-time.

havent been able to find anything yet. ill keep you posted.

BigT
01-18-2010, 07:57 PM
Call the guys at TW about CPSLO. They are right there and probably have some hookups.

TW Staff
01-20-2010, 03:14 PM
Hey gino! Nice video! Your ranking seems lower than the CP men's average ranking, but you're still young and I'll tell you most improvement happens after high school. Coaches look at attitude and potential. People rely too much on rankings; most don't realize the degree of players in each division. If you set your goals low then that's as much potential and attitude as you're going to give it. If you set them high you'd be surprised at the level you can be at!

CP doesn't have much money for scholarships, so if that's what you're looking for it'd be hard to get unless the coach knows you'll be playing top 4. Have you emailed the coach with a link to your video? Keeping it personal is the best way to show your degree of interest! I hope the best and let me know if there's any other questions I can help with!

Also, on a side note, Poly is ranked 10th for the West's Best universities for both public and private institutions. http://calpolynews.calpoly.edu/news_releases/2008/August/US_News_09.html

- Kana, TW -

gino
01-20-2010, 04:45 PM
Hey gino! Nice video! Your ranking seems lower than the CP men's average ranking, but you're still young and I'll tell you most improvement happens after high school. Coaches look at attitude and potential. People rely too much on rankings; most don't realize the degree of players in each division. If you set your goals low then that's as much potential and attitude as you're going to give it. If you set them high you'd be surprised at the level you can be at!

CP doesn't have much money for scholarships, so if that's what you're looking for it'd be hard to get unless the coach knows you'll be playing top 4. Have you emailed the coach with a link to your video? Keeping it personal is the best way to show your degree of interest! I hope the best and let me know if there's any other questions I can help with!

Also, on a side note, Poly is ranked 10th for the West's Best universities for both public and private institutions. http://calpolynews.calpoly.edu/news_releases/2008/August/US_News_09.html

- Kana, TW -

Thanks for the response Kana!
I am really determined to play CP or LMU. I am working extremely hard and I feel like I am consistently improving.

Did you play college tennis? If so, what was your ranking?

I have been training for some up coming tournaments and I hope to be in the top 100 of my section by the end of this month.

Thanks,
Gino

west coast 2 hander
01-21-2010, 02:57 PM
I'm just curious as to why you are fixated on these two schools only? As a former D1 head coach I would suggest that you contact the coaches at both schools right away and send them a video asap to get their honest feedback. Would you want to attend these schools if you didn't make the team?

TW Staff
01-22-2010, 02:42 PM
I guess the ranking system is a bit different now. TRN wasn't available so the USTA/Section listings were more valuable. I barely played any tourneys my senior year cuz of injuries; I ended 67 on the 18s SoCal list which I thought was significantly low for the team, but trained hard the month before. Poly was my first choice because of academics. Luckily enough I had coaching from the Poly coach before tryouts and with hard work I ended up becoming a walk-on. During that time, the men's team had a tournament against their team to players wanting to walk-on. Not sure if they still do that, but I could find out. Some teams have too many players as is not even having tryouts. Definitely communicate with the coach.

Anyways, most universities also has a club team, Poly being one of them. http://www.tennisoncampus.com/site3.aspx Might be fun to check that out too!

- Kana, TW -

gino
01-22-2010, 08:36 PM
I'm just curious as to why you are fixated on these two schools only? As a former D1 head coach I would suggest that you contact the coaches at both schools right away and send them a video asap to get their honest feedback. Would you want to attend these schools if you didn't make the team?

I am not fixated on these two schools. They are my two favorite schools and I would definitely attend if I didn't make the team. I already sent an email to Coach Sceney and the CP men's coach. I recieved a reply from Coach Sceney and I am going to try and keep in touch with him throughout this next year.

gino
01-22-2010, 08:39 PM
I guess the ranking system is a bit different now. TRN wasn't available so the USTA/Section listings were more valuable. I barely played any tourneys my senior year cuz of injuries; I ended 67 on the 18s SoCal list which I thought was significantly low for the team, but trained hard the month before. Poly was my first choice because of academics. Luckily enough I had coaching from the Poly coach before tryouts and with hard work I ended up becoming a walk-on. During that time, the men's team had a tournament against their team to players wanting to walk-on. Not sure if they still do that, but I could find out. Some teams have too many players as is not even having tryouts. Definitely communicate with the coach.

Anyways, most universities also has a club team, Poly being one of them. http://www.tennisoncampus.com/site3.aspx Might be fun to check that out too!

- Kana, TW -



Thanks Kana,
My private coach was also a walk-on at CP his freshman year. He was ranked #8 in NorCal boys 18's from what I understand, which is a totally different scenario than my current situation. Anyways, I know I have tons of improvement to do but I'm going to stay positive and work hard. Thanks for all the info and I will be sure to stay in contact with all the coaches.

Thanks again,
If you have any other advice let me know.

Gino

okdude1992
01-22-2010, 09:51 PM
gino i was looking at poly as well before i realized how tough it is to make their team. A TRN ranking of top 2000 or whatever doesn't even near cut it. you should look at d3 schools unless you plan on somehow improving incredibly rapidly in the next 9 months. no offense bro.

goldfish81
01-24-2010, 02:35 PM
I am not fixated on these two schools. They are my two favorite schools and I would definitely attend if I didn't make the team. I already sent an email to Coach Sceney and the CP men's coach. I recieved a reply from Coach Sceney and I am going to try and keep in touch with him throughout this next year.

i would do that. if you want to go there show some real interest and the coach will show the same in you

pac10s.com

darthpwner
01-24-2010, 07:29 PM
Here's a vid of LMU. See how you compare. Good luck gino. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9UAM1KyI5w

papatenis
01-25-2010, 08:06 AM
Hey Gino, you really have a good chance. Just looked at LUM web site, they featured a story of their newest recruit, he is a one star.

Keep practicing!

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
01-25-2010, 06:02 PM
Actually, Gino ol' sock... Keep saving your money, a LMU Lion uniform runs about 50(k) per year.
Tuition this year is @ $37(k) alone.

I don't think there any more money available for a minor sport at LMU than anywhere else- But hey, if you have $50 grand and don't really care about any post graduate schooling (because, really, what do you think happens to your grades when you play a sport?) than go for it.

As usual on all Men's tennis teams, German or Spanish as a second language will come in handy, since team mates will turn out to be your only freinds you will make while punching the NCAA clock- 25 hours a week is what a team can demand.

Come on- Logic tells you you will be missing a lot of the "college experiences" going this route, just to earn a athletic "ride" worth about the Student union fee and your parking permit.

Why not enjoy yourself and just play and be active at the club level? Head out for freindly pizza and beer after (not coaching tirades about your spot)- Think this stuff thru a little, an academically competitive place like LMU would kind of expect that level of thinking from it's incoming freshmen after all....

gino
01-25-2010, 07:42 PM
Actually, Gino ol' sock... Keep saving your money, a LMU Lion uniform runs about 50(k) per year.
Tuition this year is @ $37(k) alone.

I don't think there any more money available for a minor sport at LMU than anywhere else- But hey, if you have $50 grand and don't really care about any post graduate schooling (because, really, what do you think happens to your grades when you play a sport?) than go for it.

As usual on all Men's tennis teams, German or Spanish as a second language will come in handy, since team mates will turn out to be your only freinds you will make while punching the NCAA clock- 25 hours a week is what a team can demand.

Come on- Logic tells you you will be missing a lot of the "college experiences" going this route, just to earn a athletic "ride" worth about the Student union fee and your parking permit.

Why not enjoy yourself and just play and be active at the club level? Head out for freindly pizza and beer after (not coaching tirades about your spot)- Think this stuff thru a little, an academically competitive place like LMU would kind of expect that level of thinking from it's incoming freshmen after all....

Great point and I agree with you to a certain extent.
But I truly am passionate about tennis, this is my dream.
I've thought it through over and over in my head and I am truly set on playing at the college level. I am not too worried about the tuition because I plan to apply for tons of academic scholarships which will hopefully offset the price.

I really do appreciate all your responses, keep them coming.

Thanks,
Gino

gino
01-25-2010, 07:43 PM
Here's a vid of LMU. See how you compare. Good luck gino. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9UAM1KyI5w

Great video, thanks so much.

G

gino
01-25-2010, 07:43 PM
Hey Gino, you really have a good chance. Just looked at LUM web site, they featured a story of their newest recruit, he is a one star.

Keep practicing!

Story looked good! Thanks for the heads up.

G

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
01-31-2010, 03:15 PM
Gino, listen well... These schools have soooo many "walk ons" and the coaches always have to pay the "foreigners first" to have any chance of not stinking their way out of work- There is no money to give.

If you have THAT much happening in the scholastic areas, I will speak to you like a "Dutch Uncle" Keep up your studies- If you like science, try applied nuclear phyics and a tennis program like Case Western.

gino
02-02-2010, 10:05 AM
Haha well I suppose that's quite a reasonable response.
I will take that advice to heart, I am so interested in playing at LMU because of their specatular pre-law program as well as possibly attending their law school. So tennis or no tennis, I think I'll be happy at either school.

bobsimon
02-02-2010, 11:53 AM
Gino I'd just like to echo the concerns of the others here. Unless you plan on making money playing tennis it's just not worth the sacrifice. I was in a similar position when I was looking at colleges; for me it came down to this:
I could have played tennis at a lower (academically) D1 school, but I knew 4-years later I'd be done w/ tennis and be left with a degree from a lesser school that would probably hinder me as I moved into the professional world. Instead I chose to attend a top-tier school and have never looked back. I still enjoy tennis, much as I would at this point had I played college tennis, but I also enjoy the job I'm in now as a result of my education.

TW Staff
02-02-2010, 03:46 PM
Hey Gino! There is the thought of others to why "waste" or "sacrifice" your time in college when you can focus on achieving a degree from a more prestigious University. Nevertheless, both schools are great in academics! If you apply yourself academically it'll get you where you want to go for grad school; along with having an extra curricular activity showing them that you can balance such a tedious schedule.

The thing I feel you on is the passion of the game! The pain you feel when you can't play, the excitement you feel when your level is growing, and the love of competition! I don't regret many things, but the one thing I regret the most is quitting the team. The experience of having this family who shares the same passion and an understanding of what sacrifices it takes is amazing! People say it'll hinder your academics, but look at all the players who are successful in both athletics and academics at the more "prestigious" schools. I haven't met anyone who has regretted playing on a team, but I've met a lot who wished they did.

It is an extremely huge sacrifice, but only you can push yourself to succeed in both areas of academics and athletics. Any decision is what you think is best for yourself. Even though stopping early set me up to work at TW earlier, if I did it again, I wouldn't have stopped, would still have gotten my degree, and still believe I would've made it into the position I am at today. =)

- Kana, TW -

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
02-03-2010, 03:18 PM
Hey Gino- Cut off an earlier thought.... Listen, it's your life, but unless your like "Whizzer" White (USC football great- Supreme Court Justice) you really can't serve two masters- post graduate grades AND tennis.

Loyola Marymount is $55 (k) and unless you have some sort of money tree growing out back, let's get real- They no more have that kind of tennis money than academic money to give.... Let's start really thinking outside the box OK?

We are in some tough times and it will only get tougher (careers at Tennis Warehouse aside)- Do yourself a favor, instead of racking up $40(k) $50 (k) school debts studying Fine Arts (FARTS) how about coming out with a job already set up and a career starting in the $150(k) range?

You do the work in applied nuclear physics like I suggested, let the Navy ROTC pay for it, then bob around the pacific and the world on the Reagan for a few years- You get out and you are ready to run one of the plants that even President BO has been pushing just about that time.
Bingo.bango,bongo you are looking at some serious cash to bank along with the stash you had been saving from your Navy officer's pay (though most guys do spend some on whatever car of their young dreams).
Stay in the reserves and that takes care of a lot of other costs-budget items as well.

Time to do the homework, smell the coffee, and understand where you really want to be 10 years from now.

raygo
02-03-2010, 06:59 PM
Some good points, Manfred. :)

I was a walk-on at LMU. Had no intention of playing varsity, just happened to be hitting on the school courts and was approached by the coach afterward, and invited to practice with the team. The other guys were recruited from all over (we had guys from Spain, Croatia, and Sri Lanka) and all were on athletic scholarships. I wasn't offered any money, but I was already attending on a Navy scholarship so it wasn't an issue. In any case, I wound up playing #6 and got my share of uniforms and gear, and travelled to all the away games. Since I never expected or hoped to play a varsity sport, I thought the whole experience was gravy.

Practices were pretty long...about 3hrs on the court every afternoon and then another 1-2 hours in the gym or doing cardio (lines, wind sprints, etc). There are some stairs by the courts in the gym building that were absolutely murder. When the coach was particularly mad, we ran lines across all six courts. During breaks in the school year, expect to do two-a-days.

So as you can see, it's pretty time intensive, especially depending on how many credit hours you plan on taking each semester. You may wind up with an inconvenient class schedule (read: getting up earlier) to support going to practice. 8am classes may not seem so bad, but getting up becomes harder and harder as the late nights and all-nighters accumulate.

In my case, I worked a couple of work-study jobs for spending money. My socializing was limited to incidental contact before/during/after class, and after practice...aside from the occasional/obligatory student body organization, I was never interested in typical college stuff (I was only at LMU for a year before transferring to a certain military institution). The opportunities to have fun and party will always be there, but depending on how many things you're juggling, something else may have to give.

None of the guys on the team had any delusions of going pro, though some really cared about their NCAA ranking. Not sure about the basketball players (the big sport on campus), but teachers didn't give a lick if you were a tennis player. We took our studies as seriously as the next person...to me, tennis was a side gig.

If you get the opportunity to play, take it, and enjoy the experience! There is plenty more to learn and experience in college than just sports.

(Not sure what the talent level is at LMU these days, but we were getting slaughtered by the big names like Pepperdine, anyway. I think that may have had affected my experience somewhat...)

gino
02-03-2010, 08:25 PM
Some good points, Manfred. :)

I was a walk-on at LMU. Had no intention of playing varsity, just happened to be hitting on the school courts and was approached by the coach afterward, and invited to practice with the team. The other guys were recruited from all over (we had guys from Spain, Croatia, and Sri Lanka) and all were on athletic scholarships. I wasn't offered any money, but I was already attending on a Navy scholarship so it wasn't an issue. In any case, I wound up playing #6 and got my share of uniforms and gear, and travelled to all the away games. Since I never expected or hoped to play a varsity sport, I thought the whole experience was gravy.

Practices were pretty long...about 3hrs on the court every afternoon and then another 1-2 hours in the gym or doing cardio (lines, wind sprints, etc). There are some stairs by the courts in the gym building that were absolutely murder. When the coach was particularly mad, we ran lines across all six courts. During breaks in the school year, expect to do two-a-days.

So as you can see, it's pretty time intensive, especially depending on how many credit hours you plan on taking each semester. You may wind up with an inconvenient class schedule (read: getting up earlier) to support going to practice. 8am classes may not seem so bad, but getting up becomes harder and harder as the late nights and all-nighters accumulate.

In my case, I worked a couple of work-study jobs for spending money. My socializing was limited to incidental contact before/during/after class, and after practice...aside from the occasional/obligatory student body organization, I was never interested in typical college stuff (I was only at LMU for a year before transferring to a certain military institution). The opportunities to have fun and party will always be there, but depending on how many things you're juggling, something else may have to give.

None of the guys on the team had any delusions of going pro, though some really cared about their NCAA ranking. Not sure about the basketball players (the big sport on campus), but teachers didn't give a lick if you were a tennis player. We took our studies as seriously as the next person...to me, tennis was a side gig.

If you get the opportunity to play, take it, and enjoy the experience! There is plenty more to learn and experience in college than just sports.

(Not sure what the talent level is at LMU these days, but we were getting slaughtered by the big names like Pepperdine, anyway. I think that may have had affected my experience somewhat...)





Thanks so much for all the info, if you don't mind me asking what was your tennis background? Did you communicate with the coach at all before attending and what did you think of the experience? Maybe you could watch my video at the beginning of the thread and at least compare me to what LMU's level during your stay was like. I know it might vary from the current team but I would truly appreciate it.

I really love LMU as a whole and I would love to play there. Thanks so much for all the detail on your experience :)

Let me know what you think,
Gino

pricey_aus
02-03-2010, 08:42 PM
Hey Gino,

I haven't verbally committed just yet but I am in pretty deep talks with LMU, as the head coach is from my state in australia. I think I am going in January. I don't know if i should be saying that im in talks with them, but ahh well.

yeah, i look to be going in jan of 2011.

gino
02-03-2010, 08:45 PM
Hey Gino,

I haven't verbally committed just yet but I am in pretty deep talks with LMU, as the head coach is from my state in australia. I think I am going in January. I don't know if i should be saying that im in talks with them, but ahh well.

yeah, i look to be going in jan of 2011.

Awesome, maybe we can stay in touch throughout your recruiting process!
if you wouldn't mind giving some advice and pointers.
my email is ginoinzerillo@comcast.net
thanks!!!

Gino

gino
02-03-2010, 08:47 PM
Hey Gino- Cut off an earlier thought.... Listen, it's your life, but unless your like "Whizzer" White (USC football great- Supreme Court Justice) you really can't serve two masters- post graduate grades AND tennis.

Loyola Marymount is $55 (k) and unless you have some sort of money tree growing out back, let's get real- They no more have that kind of tennis money than academic money to give.... Let's start really thinking outside the box OK?

We are in some tough times and it will only get tougher (careers at Tennis Warehouse aside)- Do yourself a favor, instead of racking up $40(k) $50 (k) school debts studying Fine Arts (FARTS) how about coming out with a job already set up and a career starting in the $150(k) range?

You do the work in applied nuclear physics like I suggested, let the Navy ROTC pay for it, then bob around the pacific and the world on the Reagan for a few years- You get out and you are ready to run one of the plants that even President BO has been pushing just about that time.
Bingo.bango,bongo you are looking at some serious cash to bank along with the stash you had been saving from your Navy officer's pay (though most guys do spend some on whatever car of their young dreams).
Stay in the reserves and that takes care of a lot of other costs-budget items as well.

Time to do the homework, smell the coffee, and understand where you really want to be 10 years from now.



Thanks Manfred,
I promise you I will take all of your advice into consideration. Yet with all due respect I feel like I have to play tennis in college, it's what I want. Who knows, maybe there is a more practical route for me that will benefit my future in the long run. Till then, like you said, it's time to hit the books!

Thanks,
Gino

pricey_aus
02-03-2010, 08:47 PM
No worries. When are you looking at starting?

gino
02-03-2010, 08:54 PM
Hey Gino! There is the thought of others to why "waste" or "sacrifice" your time in college when you can focus on achieving a degree from a more prestigious University. Nevertheless, both schools are great in academics! If you apply yourself academically it'll get you where you want to go for grad school; along with having an extra curricular activity showing them that you can balance such a tedious schedule.

The thing I feel you on is the passion of the game! The pain you feel when you can't play, the excitement you feel when your level is growing, and the love of competition! I don't regret many things, but the one thing I regret the most is quitting the team. The experience of having this family who shares the same passion and an understanding of what sacrifices it takes is amazing! People say it'll hinder your academics, but look at all the players who are successful in both athletics and academics at the more "prestigious" schools. I haven't met anyone who has regretted playing on a team, but I've met a lot who wished they did.

It is an extremely huge sacrifice, but only you can push yourself to succeed in both areas of academics and athletics. Any decision is what you think is best for yourself. Even though stopping early set me up to work at TW earlier, if I did it again, I wouldn't have stopped, would still have gotten my degree, and still believe I would've made it into the position I am at today. =)

- Kana, TW -


Thanks so much for all the advice Kana =) Playing d-1 college tennis has always been a realistic and passionate goal of mine. I am a competitior and being a d-1 athlete is about as competitive as tennis will get without touring on the pre circuit. I am willing to make any sacrifice and I don't think pursuing my goals will hurt my studies. I totally understand what you're saying, thank you for all the advice!!!

Gino :)

gino
02-03-2010, 08:56 PM
No worries. When are you looking at starting?

I am graduating high school in june of 2011, so the fall of 2012.
Are you currently located in Australia?

raygo
02-03-2010, 11:19 PM
Thanks so much for all the info, if you don't mind me asking what was your tennis background? Did you communicate with the coach at all before attending and what did you think of the experience? Maybe you could watch my video at the beginning of the thread and at least compare me to what LMU's level during your stay was like. I know it might vary from the current team but I would truly appreciate it.

I really love LMU as a whole and I would love to play there. Thanks so much for all the detail on your experience :)

Let me know what you think,
Gino

You're very welcome, Gino! Will review your video when I get home from work, but I can answer your other questions.

I played varsity in HS, but that by itself won't get you anywhere. Since you have tournament experience, I would encourage you to approach the school directly and arrange a hit with the team to show them your stuff (and to check out the squad). My situation was a "right place at the right time" deal, and I didn't play enough tournaments to get any sort of ranking, so I'm probably not that helpful after all.

No, I didn't have any contact with the coach before I met him. I thought he was some weird guy that was watching me and my friends hit. I was initially just supposed to be a hitting partner. There weren't even tryouts that season because they already had a full squad, but after about two months, I was slotted into the roster. The point is if they like you enough, they'll find a way to bring you on, one way or another.

It will be easier if you can secure another way to finance your tuition without needing an athletic scholarship--like getting grants or an academic scholarship. Not saying you couldn't get an athletic scholarship, but competing for that limited pool of money is probably harder than actually getting on the team itself. If the athletic dept doesn't need to spend money to bring you in, they're more likely to take you onboard as a player, and then you can show your stuff and start making waves as a D1 competitor. Once you're on the team, match play determines the pecking order...doesn't matter who's on scholarship and who isn't, so just get your foot in the door!

As far as player level, we had three (later four) foreign recruits who were very good. Big surprise, they won the majority of our matches for us. The rest were So Cal locals who were solid 5.0-5.5 but weren't serious tournament players and couldn't compete for full scholarships like the foreign guys were getting. We had more players than playing spots because a lot of us didn't need money from the sports program, which was a win-win situation for everyone.

Our coach was good from a tennis perspective but had lots of issues with his personal life (he was actually fired and the assistant coach had to take over--yet another unique experience). But the quality of the instruction was still better than anything I had in HS and the higher level of play will naturally lead to improvement as long as you stay the course.

I'll take a look at your videos and see how you compare to the old team (did you know the world was black and white in 1996?:shock:). From what I've read, you already have the ability and desire. If you are able, go the extra step and offer to come to them instead of just sending a video, which helps them remember you and gives you a chance to check out the squad (and the school).

LMU is a great school for many reasons (especially if you value the Jesuit education system).

Good luck!

raygo
02-04-2010, 01:55 AM
Just saw your YT video, nice strokes. I think you'll be fine hitting with D1 level players. I couldn't really see the pace of the balls you were receiving, so I hope you're comfortable dealing with pace because a lot of players can consistently smack the crap out of the ball. And it wouldn't hurt to tailor the videos you send out or post to the college who will be viewing it. If you're set on going to a particular school , it's a good practice mention that school by name in the video. You want to be treated like an individual and not some faceless, random applicant, so you should extend the same courtesy to your college(s) of choice--even if you're applying to multiple colleges, it shows you respect each particular school.

Okay, enough preaching from me. Good luck with your application! Keep us posted!

gino
02-05-2010, 03:50 PM
Just saw your YT video, nice strokes. I think you'll be fine hitting with D1 level players. I couldn't really see the pace of the balls you were receiving, so I hope you're comfortable dealing with pace because a lot of players can consistently smack the crap out of the ball. And it wouldn't hurt to tailor the videos you send out or post to the college who will be viewing it. If you're set on going to a particular school , it's a good practice mention that school by name in the video. You want to be treated like an individual and not some faceless, random applicant, so you should extend the same courtesy to your college(s) of choice--even if you're applying to multiple colleges, it shows you respect each particular school.

Okay, enough preaching from me. Good luck with your application! Keep us posted!

Thanks so much for all the advice raygo. This does help a lot, I really appreciate you taking the time to give all that information :) Did you play a lot of junior tournaments? Your situation sounds pretty special, but awesome. I really hope to play at LMU and I love the school. Thanks for taking the time to watch my video also, I was playing with some pretty highly ranked junior players from NorCal so I was hitting against a pretty tough ball.

I am going to re-do a video soon. In better quality with a lot of view from behind so who ever is watching can see a little better. I'll be sure to change the name at the beginning, thanks for the tip.

I just feel like the coaches at all these top programs might not look at my game as seriously because of my ranking. I'm working really hard on improving it and I will be sure to keep everyone updated.

If anyone has some more advice let me know :)

Thanks Raygo and all,
Gino

raygo
02-07-2010, 04:38 PM
You're very welcome, Gino. I wouldn't worry so much about your ranking, and if you don't focus on it in your videos/interviews, I doubt it will matter. Not everyone who tries out for college tennis competed actively in junior tennis, anyway. While a high ranking will almost guarantee offers, the inverse isn't automatically true. :) Coaches have an eye for talent and will want to see you play in person. I wasn't active at all in junior tournaments, just the HS team.

For what it's worth, it might help to work on your doubles game, as it's a staple of college matches. Think Davis Cup, but with the same players for singles and doubles.

Good luck!