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ubermeyer
01-06-2010, 07:39 PM
Okay so my tennis tryouts are coming up soon, with a very competitive team...

What are coaches REALLY looking for during tryouts?

ManuGinobili
01-06-2010, 07:55 PM
Complete domination

dlesser13
01-06-2010, 08:00 PM
how you compete is a big thing at the high school level. You can have flashy strokes, but if you are a true competitor and are willing to grind matches out/find ways to win/overcome ie competing, then coaches will look highly on you. But good strokes are always a nice thing too :p as well as point construction and attitude/emotions. I think that covers most of high school tennis. By the way, what school in texas do you play for? I am pretty familiar with the legitmate teams in the state.

athiker
01-07-2010, 06:59 AM
Is this High School? Are you a freshman? I think it makes a difference. If you are a freshman and trying out for the first time the coach will probably be looking for different things than if you are a junior or senior. If it is college then it will also be different. The younger you are the more some of the following might make a difference as the coach is looking more for athletic fitness and raw potential talent that he can coach.

Since tryouts are coming up soon you are probably not going to radically change your strokes at this point but there are some things that are completely under your control.

1) Be a fitness fanatic...you can show up in top shape. Even a month or less is enough time to improve your fitiness. Work on both endurance and quickness. Leg strength and upper body. No matter what style of tennis you play showing up in shape says a lot to coach.

2) Diet...not for weight but for health. Even if you are in H.S. eating good healthy "real" food with a good mix proteins, fats and carbs will be beneficial. It will certainly put you ahead of most H.S. kids diets. A lot of people don't see the light on this until much later in life. It will make your workouts more beneficial and give you more balanced energy levels.

3) Attitude. You are going to hit some bad shots, everyone does. If you are a freshman playing some older kids you may even lose more than you win. You can act like a frustrated idiot thinking you will give the impression you usually play better...a doubtful strategy...or focus on the moment and play your best right now. Tennis is like baseball, there is no clock...so just focus on making the next best shot you can. You can give the impression you will melt down under match play, or the impression you stay focused and determined and give you best effort regardless of circumstances.

4) Coachability...similar to attitude. If you are a star you don't have to worry about this one as much. If you are not, you want to make it clear to the coaches that you will be easy to have on the team, are looking to get better and willing to change to get better. I'm an old guy now in my 40's but still remember on year in H.S. basketball. This one kid improved dramatically one summer and came out for tryouts one year. It was like he wasn't the same kid, he was so much better, but his attitude was so much worse. He was cocky and a jerk...didn't make the team. I have no doubt at all in my mind that it was purely b/c the coach just didn't want to deal with him.

5) Use your brain as well as your body. Learn all you can about the sport...technique and strategy...and then actually use it in matches. Having natural talent is great, and maybe you have it in spades idk, but there are plenty of overachievers out there in all sports as well. There are a ton of low cost resources out there on the internet now as well as readily available books/DVDs to buy or borrow from the library.

Good luck and try to stay loose!...don't forget to breathe...does amazing things for relaxation in potentially tense situations.

charliefedererer
01-07-2010, 11:45 AM
Is this High School? Are you a freshman? I think it makes a difference. If you are a freshman and trying out for the first time the coach will probably be looking for different things than if you are a junior or senior. If it is college then it will also be different. The younger you are the more some of the following might make a difference as the coach is looking more for athletic fitness and raw potential talent that he can coach.

Since tryouts are coming up soon you are probably not going to radically change your strokes at this point but there are some things that are completely under your control.

1) Be a fitness fanatic...you can show up in top shape. Even a month or less is enough time to improve your fitiness. Work on both endurance and quickness. Leg strength and upper body. No matter what style of tennis you play showing up in shape says a lot to coach.

2) Diet...not for weight but for health. Even if you are in H.S. eating good healthy "real" food with a good mix proteins, fats and carbs will be beneficial. It will certainly put you ahead of most H.S. kids diets. A lot of people don't see the light on this until much later in life. It will make your workouts more beneficial and give you more balanced energy levels.

3) Attitude. You are going to hit some bad shots, everyone does. If you are a freshman playing some older kids you may even lose more than you win. You can act like a frustrated idiot thinking you will give the impression you usually play better...a doubtful strategy...or focus on the moment and play your best right now. Tennis is like baseball, there is no clock...so just focus on making the next best shot you can. You can give the impression you will melt down under match play, or the impression you stay focused and determined and give you best effort regardless of circumstances.

4) Coachability...similar to attitude. If you are a star you don't have to worry about this one as much. If you are not, you want to make it clear to the coaches that you will be easy to have on the team, are looking to get better and willing to change to get better. I'm an old guy now in my 40's but still remember on year in H.S. basketball. This one kid improved dramatically one summer and came out for tryouts one year. It was like he wasn't the same kid, he was so much better, but his attitude was so much worse. He was cocky and a jerk...didn't make the team. I have no doubt at all in my mind that it was purely b/c the coach just didn't want to deal with him.

5) Use your brain as well as your body. Learn all you can about the sport...technique and strategy...and then actually use it in matches. Having natural talent is great, and maybe you have it in spades idk, but there are plenty of overachievers out there in all sports as well. There are a ton of low cost resources out there on the internet now as well as readily available books/DVDs to buy or borrow from the library.

Good luck and try to stay loose!...don't forget to breathe...does amazing things for relaxation in potentially tense situations.

Great reply to a worthwhile question. Coaches are not only looking for current ability but looking for coachable potential.

charliefedererer
01-07-2010, 11:48 AM
Okay so my tennis tryouts are coming up soon, with a very competitive team...

What are coaches REALLY looking for during tryouts?

If you can get in some extra time to practice before tryouts, your efforts won't miraculously give you a great game, but may boost your consistancy enough to nab one of the positions on the team.

That includes time practicing serves and even hitting against a backboard if you can't find a hitting partner that day.

W Cats
01-07-2010, 12:15 PM
As a H.S. coach this is what I keep my antennae out for.

Headache
Ability
Headache
Coachability
Headache
Attitude
Headache
Competative desire
Headache
Sportsmanship
Headache
Hunger to improve
Headache
Intelligence
Headache
Fitness
Headache

Did I mention Headache? Those are the ones I tend to weed out first. To be fair, how much of a headache I'll tolerate depends on my ability to tolerate said headache and their possible contribution to the team.

If you happen to have parents that can cause headaches, you know the one's I mean, keep them off the courts.

charliefedererer
01-07-2010, 12:18 PM
As a H.S. coach this is what I keep my antennae out for.

Headache
Ability
Headache
Coachability
Headache
Attitude
Headache
Competative desire
Headache
Sportsmanship
Headache
Hunger to improve
Headache
Intelligence
Headache
Fitness
Headache

Did I mention Headache? Those are the ones I tend to weed out first. To be fair, how much of a headache I'll tolerate depends on my ability to tolerate said headache and their possible contribution to the team.

If you happen to have parents that can cause headaches, you know the one's I mean, keep them off the courts.

Thank you for your honesty. It sounds like you have real experience first in having headaches, and now in how best to avoid them.

W Cats
01-07-2010, 12:30 PM
Thank you for your honesty. It sounds like you have real experience first in having headaches, and now in how best to avoid them.

You're welcome.

I really, really enjoy coaching and being with the kids I coach. My philosophy is to minimize the things that interfere with that enjoyment as much as possible. It helps me to be my best for the kids on the court. Just my experience.:):)

CallOfBooty
01-07-2010, 03:57 PM
Not true in every case, but coaches usually like a person who shows that they can volley. Coaches enjoy seeing a player who can hit an approach shot (that is not a winner) and finish a point at the net with either a volley or overhead. Coaches usually like to see net play even in singles, and it definitely can't hurt to improve your volleying :)

ubermeyer
01-07-2010, 04:36 PM
how you compete is a big thing at the high school level. You can have flashy strokes, but if you are a true competitor and are willing to grind matches out/find ways to win/overcome ie competing, then coaches will look highly on you. But good strokes are always a nice thing too :p as well as point construction and attitude/emotions. I think that covers most of high school tennis. By the way, what school in texas do you play for? I am pretty familiar with the legitmate teams in the state.

Thanks for the reply. However, I really don't want to divulge my school/exact location/name etc. because I have already divulged my age and ethnicity, and if I reveal any more, there might be too much publicly available online information about me than is safe (not that I think anything bad about YOU, just generally i wouldn't like to reveal that)

ubermeyer
01-07-2010, 04:40 PM
Is this High School? Are you a freshman? I think it makes a difference. If you are a freshman and trying out for the first time the coach will probably be looking for different things than if you are a junior or senior. If it is college then it will also be different. The younger you are the more some of the following might make a difference as the coach is looking more for athletic fitness and raw potential talent that he can coach.

Since tryouts are coming up soon you are probably not going to radically change your strokes at this point but there are some things that are completely under your control.

1) Be a fitness fanatic...you can show up in top shape. Even a month or less is enough time to improve your fitiness. Work on both endurance and quickness. Leg strength and upper body. No matter what style of tennis you play showing up in shape says a lot to coach.

2) Diet...not for weight but for health. Even if you are in H.S. eating good healthy "real" food with a good mix proteins, fats and carbs will be beneficial. It will certainly put you ahead of most H.S. kids diets. A lot of people don't see the light on this until much later in life. It will make your workouts more beneficial and give you more balanced energy levels.

3) Attitude. You are going to hit some bad shots, everyone does. If you are a freshman playing some older kids you may even lose more than you win. You can act like a frustrated idiot thinking you will give the impression you usually play better...a doubtful strategy...or focus on the moment and play your best right now. Tennis is like baseball, there is no clock...so just focus on making the next best shot you can. You can give the impression you will melt down under match play, or the impression you stay focused and determined and give you best effort regardless of circumstances.

4) Coachability...similar to attitude. If you are a star you don't have to worry about this one as much. If you are not, you want to make it clear to the coaches that you will be easy to have on the team, are looking to get better and willing to change to get better. I'm an old guy now in my 40's but still remember on year in H.S. basketball. This one kid improved dramatically one summer and came out for tryouts one year. It was like he wasn't the same kid, he was so much better, but his attitude was so much worse. He was cocky and a jerk...didn't make the team. I have no doubt at all in my mind that it was purely b/c the coach just didn't want to deal with him.

5) Use your brain as well as your body. Learn all you can about the sport...technique and strategy...and then actually use it in matches. Having natural talent is great, and maybe you have it in spades idk, but there are plenty of overachievers out there in all sports as well. There are a ton of low cost resources out there on the internet now as well as readily available books/DVDs to buy or borrow from the library.

Good luck and try to stay loose!...don't forget to breathe...does amazing things for relaxation in potentially tense situations.

Great reply. I'm a sophomore but this is my biggest chance to make the JV team, as the coach doesn't really like Juniors on JV (and doesn't allow seniors on JV), and I really don't think I can make Varsity (although if I work really hard nonstop... there may be a miniscule chance in senior year, but it's doubtful.)

Thanks everyone for the replies... If you answer this next too it would be great

Would entering a tournament be helpful? (I haven't played one before though many people, including my coach, have recommended it)

Zachol82
01-07-2010, 04:43 PM
Complete domination

Totally agree with that! But if you can't pull it off...

A HS coach also looks for:
Consistency
Service
Determination
Attitude

Mainly consistency. High school students, although some are incredibly skillful, tend to be inconsistent. Sure, you may have one or two just plain out awesome players, but aside from them, you have to beat the others by being more consistent. If your coach sees that you can keep a rally going for 5 or more shots...and they're not all lobs...then chances are you're in.

And YES, enter a tournament! Any serious tennis matches will be the best and fastest way for you to learn, win or lose.

ManuGinobili
01-07-2010, 07:45 PM
Is this High School? Are you a freshman? I think it makes a difference. If you are a freshman and trying out for the first time the coach will probably be looking for different things than if you are a junior or senior. If it is college then it will also be different. The younger you are the more some of the following might make a difference as the coach is looking more for athletic fitness and raw potential talent that he can coach.

Since tryouts are coming up soon you are probably not going to radically change your strokes at this point but there are some things that are completely under your control.

...


Brilliant! Adults do have wise thoughts lolll

For JV, your athletic ability and spirits value to the team is rather more important than your actual skill - sad? No, because it's a great base to improve your skill dramatically.

Be a fun person to be around (helpful, listen well) and make yourself stand out in that way.

dlesser13
01-07-2010, 08:30 PM
Def suggest tournaments as they are very similar if not more demanding then playing for your school. They are great mental game boosters and great match experience. Playing casually with your friends or hitting partners is one thing, but when you are playing for your school or yourself in tournaments, then there is more on the line, the more you can perform under pressure, the better a player you will be. Not trying to be a creeper or anything, but do you have a region or size of your school(5a/4a)? I understand the whole confidentiality thing.

Blake0
01-07-2010, 09:48 PM
Make sure you show your coach that you have potential. By that, you should be coachable, ready to learn, have a good attitude, willing to work hard, etc.

That's important things you need to have at any school.

Now if you try out for a really good team..you'll need to be a pretty good player to get in the team. Most important things really are that you should be able to play singles and doubles, and you have to show that you can play well under a little pressure.

Solat
01-07-2010, 11:28 PM
be first one there and last one to leave, make sure the coach knows you personally, ie introduce yourself, tell him/her your background and that your serious about earning a spot in the team.

MethodTennis
01-09-2010, 05:23 AM
I wasn't picked for my school team of 4 as I lost a half court tie break to 7 in the rain 7-6. Not good. ohh and I'm not on the rugby team so had i would i probably wouldn't of got asked to play as rugby players are gods at all sports at my school.

Attitude is a big thing and obviously the ability to win. If they them-selfs don't play tennis then they are probably looking for strokes that look like federers

BullDogTennis
01-09-2010, 12:27 PM
win matches, show your in good shape, show your coachable, and if your getting beat don't show a big fat head and have a mental breakdown.

Zachol82
01-09-2010, 05:49 PM
Attitude, mental toughness and all that are good...but game-wise I would suggest working on your consistency, it'll take you pretty far.

KenC
01-09-2010, 11:56 PM
I think CharlieFederer nailed it, and I'll add that good coaches also look for the same things that future bosses look for:
-Are you successful in just about everything you do?
-How do you react when things aren't going your way?
-How's your determination, as in do you quit in frustration or feed on it to elevate your performance?
-How do you take criticism and advice?
-How do you work in a team, as in does your ego stipulate that you get all the glory?
-Can you respect authority?

The same things that coaches look for are the same things that will take you very far in life.