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i love t3nn1s
01-11-2010, 12:08 PM
I have been reading about HIIT and i read that with HIIT, you can burn more calories and fat than just plain running without stopping in half the time.

Is this true? If it is, i really want to give it a shot because i have been running everyday for 60 min or more without stopping and i have come to a point where it is getting very boring, and i am looking to try some other cardio to mix things up a bit.

Can anyone that knows alot about this give me some more info?

charliefedererer
01-11-2010, 12:58 PM
HIIT is definitely the way to go if you are a tennis player and have already built up a good base from your running.
Tennis is a start and stop sport, so while long distance running is good for cardiovascular health and stamina, it is not tennis specific training. Because of the changes in direction and balance, it is not just sprinting on a bike or walking. The best tennis training will use some long distance running for exercise, more HIIT than long distance running, squats for leg stength, lunges for strength and flexibility and agility drills for developing the start/stop/change of direction neuromuscular coordination. You might even do some plyometrics for more explosive power, but just be careful not to cause an injury.
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/intervaltraining.html
http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_269.pdf

charliefedererer
01-11-2010, 01:04 PM
This is a quote by Ano from a recent talk tennis thread:

"Yes.

Interval training develop aerobic capacity faster than aerobic training.

The fastest way to increase VO2 max, the standard measure of aerobic fitness, is through interval training, not long duration distances.

Journal of Physiology, “Short term sprint interval versus traditional endurance training: Similar initial adaptations in human skeletal muscle and exercise performance.” Sept 2006, Vol 575 Issue 3.

Study specifics- comparison of 20 minutes of interval training (30 sec sprint/ 4 minute rest) with 90-120 minutes in the “heart rate zone.”

Results- same improvement in oxygen utilization. One hour per week vs. 4.5-hours per week.


J Physiol. 2006 Sep 15;575(Pt 3):901-11. Epub 2006 Jul 6.


Short-term sprint interval versus traditional endurance training: similar initial adaptations in human skeletal muscle and exercise performance.

Gibala MJ, Little JP, van Essen M, Wilkin GP, Burgomaster KA, Safdar A, Raha S, Tarnopolsky MA.

Department of Kinesiology IWC AB122, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada. gibalam@mcmaster.ca

Brief, intense exercise training may induce metabolic and performance adaptations comparable to traditional endurance training. However, no study has directly compared these diverse training strategies in a standardized manner.

We therefore examined changes in exercise capacity and molecular and cellular adaptations in skeletal muscle after low volume sprint-interval training (SIT) and high volume endurance training (ET). Sixteen active men (21 +/- 1 years, ) were assigned to a SIT or ET group (n = 8 each) and performed six training sessions over 14 days.

Each session consisted of either four to six repeats of 30 s 'all out' cycling at approximately 250% with 4 min recovery (SIT) or 90-120 min continuous cycling at approximately 65% (ET).

Training time commitment over 2 weeks was approximately 2.5 h for SIT and approximately 10.5 h for ET, and total training volume was approximately 90% lower for SIT versus ET ( approximately 630 versus approximately 6500 kJ).

Training decreased the time required to complete 50 and 750 kJ cycling time trials, with no difference between groups (main effects, P </= 0.05).

Biopsy samples obtained before and after training revealed similar increases in muscle oxidative capacity, as reflected by the maximal activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and COX subunits II and IV protein content (main effects, P </= 0.05), but COX II and IV mRNAs were unchanged.

Training-induced increases in muscle buffering capacity and glycogen content were also similar between groups (main effects, P </= 0.05). Given the large difference in training volume, these data demonstrate that SIT is a time-efficient strategy to induce rapid adaptations in skeletal muscle and exercise performance that are comparable to ET in young active men.

PMID: 16825308 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

For you science geek, below is the link to the complete study:

http://jp.physoc.org/cgi/content/full/575/3/901


If you were a top fitness trainer, and your clients were looking to improve their aerobic capacity as fast as possible, which method would you choose?"

If you are interested in more data on HIIT from Ano, it would be worthwhile reading all his posts from the following thread:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=292736&page=2

r2473
01-11-2010, 01:25 PM
I think you are asking if HIIT is more effective for fat loss than steady state running.

Personally, I have found that effective dieting techniques vary from person to person. Some do very well cutting calories significantly. For some, such extreme cutting results in a much slower metabolism and worse results than moderate cutting.

Some get by better (or fare no worse) doing no cardio. Just lifting weights (to minimize / prevent muscle loss while dieting). Some do best with steady state. Some do best with HIIT. Some with other things.

I think you need to experiment to see what works best for you.

That said, I have had very good results with:

1) Moderate calorie reduction (20% below maintenance)

2) Weight training 3 days / week

3) HIIT

With calorie reduction, I tend to zig-zag around. Some days at maintenance. Some days up to 35% below maintenance. But the net result is about a 20% reduction for the week.

With HIIT, in the first few weeks / month, I do HIIT 3 days per week for about 15 minutes. As I continue with my diet, I gradually add more days of HIIT and increase the duration (as my body adapts).

Find what works best for you and be patient. 2 lbs. / week fat loss is HUGE!!

i love t3nn1s
01-11-2010, 06:02 PM
okay so today i tried out the HIIT workout on a treadmill, and i must say, it had me surprised because after i was done, i felt as tired as when i do my daily 60 min run with 6 incline, and 5.7 speed on the treadmill.

The HIIT workout i did, was as follows:

I first started with a 5 min. warmup walk to get the blood flowing.
Then i started the workout by running at the level 10 speed on the treadmill with level 2 incline, for 30 seconds, then a light easy walk for 2 min.

I did this rotation 7 times, and the total time took about 35 min. including a 5 min cooldown walk at the end.


To my surprise, i felt as tired, if not even more than doing my daily 60 min run with 5.7 speed, and 6 incline.
I also was sweating the same amount, and my legs are sore.

Overall, i enjoy this better than the same old boring running at the same speed for 60 min.

Now i have a few questions. When i do the 60 min run with no stop, the treadmill says i burn over 800 calories usually. (and yes i know this is not accurate) But after i finished this HIIT workout, it only says i burn 330 calories. Is it supposed to be like this? Did i mess up on my HIIT workout?
Or am i just being paranoid.

i love t3nn1s
01-11-2010, 07:16 PM
anyone??????

cesarmo03
01-11-2010, 07:47 PM
love u are going to burn a lot of more calories trough the day, your body will feel that u use more energy from your body and your metabolism is going to accelerate the next 48 hours. I read that on www.menshealth.com

Im trying to find that info.

cesarmo03
01-11-2010, 07:52 PM
i hope this page can answer all of your questions.

Enjoy http://www.iwantsixpackabs.com/my_video_tips/interval_training.html

i love t3nn1s
01-11-2010, 09:43 PM
hey thanks for that site. Got all my questions answered.

r2473
01-12-2010, 10:13 AM
i hope this page can answer all of your questions.

Enjoy http://www.iwantsixpackabs.com/my_video_tips/interval_training.html

It's funny that his interval training routine is an EXACT ripoff of something Cosgrove put out (though I guess I can't say for sure who was first).

Anyway, that is the exact interval routine I am following now.

li0scc0
01-12-2010, 10:20 AM
First, let's think about tennis. You can play recreational doubles tennis for 3 hours and not feel tired. Or you can play an hour straight of rally games with 12 balls (so you don't have to waste time getting balls) and be smashed.

So here is the thing. How can we properly do HIIT? Do NOT do 10 minutes with a few intervals. If you really want to work the heart and burn fat, do a typical 30 minute or more cardio workout, but include intervals.

And here is the thing. Most any trainer will tell you that this is what they have been having their trainees do for, oh, ever? Its just that we have a cute new name for it...HIIT.

spacediver
01-12-2010, 12:14 PM
for a more nuanced view on the use of HIIT in combination with tempo and steady state cardio, I'd recommend browsing through lyle's mcdonald's stuff on www.bodyrecomposition.com

Matt H.
01-12-2010, 12:41 PM
take a look at the body of an olympic distance/marathon runner.


take a look at the body of a sprinter.


you'll notice a difference.

Tennis_Monk
01-12-2010, 07:43 PM
take a look at the body of an olympic distance/marathon runner.


take a look at the body of a sprinter.


you'll notice a difference.

could you elaborate?

I generally find HIIT to be less satisfying than a steady paced work out. I do both but my preference is towards steady paced. Generally i crank up my tread mill to 7.5-8.0 and then run for 2.5-3 miles non stop right from get go. One or two days a week i do HIIT where i do 1 min at 10 and 2 mins at 7.5 continuosly. I also have a Interval training program on my tread mill which is more generous (it goes to 10 for 1 min and 6 for 3 mins and 4 for 2 mins before repeating the routine).

How tired i am depends on the day i have been having. There are days when i feel it is a bear to run even a mile but will end up slugging out the 2.5-3.0 miles mark and then there are days when i can run 3.0 miles and feel i can do it all over again. I tried to reason it but couldnt find a pattern so far.

Gmedlo
01-13-2010, 01:14 PM
All this talk of people doing HIIT with 1 minute intervals is cracking me up. That is interval training, but certainly not high intensity interval training. HIIT involves maximum effort intervals. Even world-class athletes are not capable of sprinting for 1 minute straight, and they certainly cannot do the same multiple times after a minute or two of rest.

The most common form of HIIT is the classic sprinting the straightaways, jogging/walking the curve on a track. This means 10-14s maximal bouts and 30-40s of rest.

To answer the OP, yes, HIIT will be more effective. But it is also much, much, much more challenging than steady-state cardio, and it can't really be done on the same day as any weightlifting.

kslick
01-13-2010, 02:15 PM
All this talk of people doing HIIT with 1 minute intervals is cracking me up. That is interval training, but certainly not high intensity interval training. HIIT involves maximum effort intervals. Even world-class athletes are not capable of sprinting for 1 minute straight, and they certainly cannot do the same multiple times after a minute or two of rest.

The most common form of HIIT is the classic sprinting the straightaways, jogging/walking the curve on a track. This means 10-14s maximal bouts and 30-40s of rest.

To answer the OP, yes, HIIT will be more effective. But it is also much, much, much more challenging than steady-state cardio, and it can't really be done on the same day as any weightlifting.

Completely agree. Max effort for 1 minute, no way. I try to keep my HIIT intervals no more than 30 secs.

i love t3nn1s
01-13-2010, 02:30 PM
thankx for the replies everyone!

I have just one more question.

Like i have posted before, i have been running for about 60min everyday on the treadmill for several months, and i have lost weight.

Now i am trying to burn extra fat off my body, and decided to give HIIT a try, because running for 60 min everyday gets real old, and boring, so thats why i decided to give HIIT a try.

Now my question is, will i gain weight back doing HIIT instead of the usual 60 min running? Or, will the HIIT help me in my quest to burn off extra fat from body.

(btw, my diet has not changed. Same as what helped me lose weight while running 60 min. everyday.)

thanx!

kslick
01-13-2010, 02:44 PM
My advice is mix it up. Keep the body guessing. Do your 60 mins on certain days and do HIIT the other days.

tennis24
01-13-2010, 02:50 PM
yes.. but do endurance training as well

lidoazndiabloboi
01-13-2010, 06:31 PM
You should try the "Insanity" workout. Its made by the people of P90X. Try it out. If you survive it, then you should be good to go.

i love t3nn1s
01-13-2010, 06:40 PM
anyone else have a answer for my last question i asked?

BTW, please answer the question i asked and not make it go off topic, like the post above me. Which, clearly was not what i was asking.

cesarmo03
01-13-2010, 07:41 PM
hey love like kslick said "mix it up" no just only your workout also your diet try to change some food, it must be awful eating the same stuff like everyday (im talking with experience i hate but really hate to drink protein shakes so many times they taste like...)

if you do your interval training some days and your normal running you will boost your metabolism remember your body will adjust to a workout within 2 months so u have to change it.

You are working out to be fit, healthy and happy, so enjoy doing every stuff u want and try to mix it up.

35ft6
01-14-2010, 10:04 AM
I've done HIIT only when I was short on time, and I had it at a 1 to 3 ratio, so 1 minute of sprinting then 3 minutes of jogging. I'm going to reprogram my treadmill to 1 to 2. I'll do this for a few weeks.

I'm in the same boat, getting tired of running an hour a day. Luckily, I replace running with tennis several times a week, but still...

Tennis_Monk
01-14-2010, 07:00 PM
All this talk of people doing HIIT with 1 minute intervals is cracking me up. That is interval training, but certainly not high intensity interval training. HIIT involves maximum effort intervals. Even world-class athletes are not capable of sprinting for 1 minute straight, and they certainly cannot do the same multiple times after a minute or two of rest.

The most common form of HIIT is the classic sprinting the straightaways, jogging/walking the curve on a track. This means 10-14s maximal bouts and 30-40s of rest.

To answer the OP, yes, HIIT will be more effective. But it is also much, much, much more challenging than steady-state cardio, and it can't really be done on the same day as any weightlifting.

Glad that you find this entertaining...

Zachol82
01-14-2010, 11:44 PM
I have been reading about HIIT and i read that with HIIT, you can burn more calories and fat than just plain running without stopping in half the time.

Is this true? If it is, i really want to give it a shot because i have been running everyday for 60 min or more without stopping and i have come to a point where it is getting very boring, and i am looking to try some other cardio to mix things up a bit.

Can anyone that knows alot about this give me some more info?

Just want to make one thing clear about HIIT: YES YOU WILL LOSE WEIGHT AND INCREASE YOUR ENDURANCE IN A VERY SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME. If you do it correctly, it is very, very, very challenging, both physically and mentally. I do this every 2-3 months for one month with two friends and I am not exaggerating when I say it really works.

Now that that's out of the way. Should you do HIIT often? No.

You should lose anywhere from 3-5lbs per week for the first 2-3 weeks of HIIT. This means that you are losing an alarming amount of muscle mass as well, since it's pretty much impossible to lose 1lb of pure fat per week. HIIT is high-intensity, as the name suggests, and is not exactly the healthiest exercise for your heart.

If you are going to try it, keep these things in mind for your own good:
1. Eat healthy. And by healthy I don't mean eat less. You NEED the energy to keep doing this exercise correctly and effectively. Many people who wants to lose weight tend to exercise a lot while cutting back a lot of food as well, thinking it'd help them. It wont, it will only harm you.

2. Only do HIIT twice a week, 3 times if you really want to push it and you are healthy. If you do the routine correctly, you're not going to have the energy to do it more than 3 times a week, trust me.

3. Do lift weights and very, very light cardio, such as swimming, on non-HIIT days. Lifting weights is very important, as aforementioned, HIIT will rid you of a lot of muscle mass very quickly.

4. Consistency. It's a pain in the ***, but if you're going to do it, do it right. Go every week and don't cut any corners.

5. Take 1-2 months off after your 4 weeks of continuous HIIT.

If you are not sure of what to do for HIIT, just let me know. I have been doing this for more than 2 years now, with good results, so I can give you some pretty decent exercises.

i love t3nn1s
01-15-2010, 12:21 AM
hey Zach, thanx for the great and very detailed reply.

You also cleared up a question i was about to ask, about the whole taking it light on the cardio thing when im not doing hiit workouts. I took a day off from hiit, and tried to do the usual steady 60 min. run, and i couldnt last.
That hiit sure does work me well!!! lol.

lidoazndiabloboi
01-15-2010, 12:46 AM
What kind of HIIT workouts are you doing?
just sprinting/walking or other routines?

i love t3nn1s
01-15-2010, 02:04 AM
i juss started doing HIIT workouts. I did my first one on a treadmill, at 11 speed for 30 sec, and 2.5 walk for 2 min. I did that 8 times. Was EXTREMELY exhausted, which i guess is a good thing.. lol

Then the second time i did HIIT, i did it out on the track, because i got a feeling sooner or later i would fall on the treadmill, and because it takes several seconds on the treadmill to change between speeds, so i am now gonna do the workouts out on the tracks. Much easier to time myself, and change speeds.

For now, i am just doing 30 sec. of full out sprint as fast as my legs can carry me, then a steady 2 min walk. I do this 8 times.

mikro112
01-15-2010, 05:22 AM
Just want to make one thing clear about HIIT: YES YOU WILL LOSE WEIGHT AND INCREASE YOUR ENDURANCE IN A VERY SHORT AMOUNT OF TIME. If you do it correctly, it is very, very, very challenging, both physically and mentally. I do this every 2-3 months for one month with two friends and I am not exaggerating when I say it really works.

Now that that's out of the way. Should you do HIIT often? No.

You should lose anywhere from 3-5lbs per week for the first 2-3 weeks of HIIT. This means that you are losing an alarming amount of muscle mass as well, since it's pretty much impossible to lose 1lb of pure fat per week. HIIT is high-intensity, as the name suggests, and is not exactly the healthiest exercise for your heart.

If you are going to try it, keep these things in mind for your own good:
1. Eat healthy. And by healthy I don't mean eat less. You NEED the energy to keep doing this exercise correctly and effectively. Many people who wants to lose weight tend to exercise a lot while cutting back a lot of food as well, thinking it'd help them. It wont, it will only harm you.

2. Only do HIIT twice a week, 3 times if you really want to push it and you are healthy. If you do the routine correctly, you're not going to have the energy to do it more than 3 times a week, trust me.

3. Do lift weights and very, very light cardio, such as swimming, on non-HIIT days. Lifting weights is very important, as aforementioned, HIIT will rid you of a lot of muscle mass very quickly.

4. Consistency. It's a pain in the ***, but if you're going to do it, do it right. Go every week and don't cut any corners.

5. Take 1-2 months off after your 4 weeks of continuous HIIT.

If you are not sure of what to do for HIIT, just let me know. I have been doing this for more than 2 years now, with good results, so I can give you some pretty decent exercises.

Check your Email please!

lidoazndiabloboi
01-15-2010, 10:11 PM
well if you ever get bored of just doing sprinting/jogging, as i posted before, you can try doing the Insanity workout.
Ive been doing it for the past couple of weeks, and its been helping me out alot. If you are not familiar with it, it is also high intensity interval workouts, revolving around jumping, squatting, sprinting etc. Its pretty insane. Give it a try

masterxfob
01-21-2010, 10:47 AM
i've been doing some interval running instead of my normal 3+ hours of tennis due to the rain in southern caliornia. the workout is only about 30 minutes and is actually quite exhausting. it's helping me maintain my weight and staying in shape, but it sure is a boring way to go about doing it. can't wait for this damn rain to stop. first thing i do when i win the lottery is build my own indoor tennis courts!

on a positive note, i can definitely see how this type of workout is more effective than just playing tennis or jogging a few miles. although i find all walking/jogging/running to be extremely boring, i think i may incorporate it into my routine.