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View Full Version : COUNTERPUNCHERS Where are you at!


monkeyisland90
01-12-2010, 01:07 PM
So i'm definately a counter puncher... I basically grind my way out, hit shots with lot of topspin (due to western grip).. try move people around and will be very offensive when i have chance or feel confident.. My only downside is that my mental side is what is weak and sometimes don't have patience for long rallies and just frustrated and smack the ball out (obviously not on purpose but just frustrating).. i'll work on mental side but what would you say is your magic number where you see your opponents make errors? I can see if you have a stronger stroke then it wil lbe shorter while pushing styles will be longer since no heat but still as effected if you can last longer.....

I don't have a magic number... and i've read something that it's kind of good to have so you can have a mind set of having this amount of shots back in play ... not a necessity but any little tip does help..

LeeD
01-12-2010, 01:28 PM
Most strong counterpushers like to hit 3 shots before they start going for angles and alleys. At least that's what my friends say.
Me, I'm more 1 or 2 at the most, so I call myself a LOSER in tennis.

5263
01-12-2010, 01:30 PM
So i'm definately a counter puncher... I basically grind my way out, hit shots with lot of topspin (due to western grip).. try move people around and will be very offensive when i have chance or feel confident.. My only downside is that my mental side is what is weak and sometimes don't have patience for long rallies and just frustrated and smack the ball out (obviously not on purpose but just frustrating).. i'll work on mental side but what would you say is your magic number where you see your opponents make errors? I can see if you have a stronger stroke then it wil lbe shorter while pushing styles will be longer since no heat but still as effected if you can last longer.....

I don't have a magic number... and i've read something that it's kind of good to have so you can have a mind set of having this amount of shots back in play ... not a necessity but any little tip does help..

I'm thinking that if you are always willing and able to make your opponent hit 7 shots, you can beat 80-90% of opponents around your level. I try to teach students to rally 4-5 balls in rtn games before going on the attack (which can be another 2-4 shots). This helps them to stay in a rhythm and forces the server to really work to hold serve. If they are a good server (most of my students are) then the service points will be much shorter, but by trying to rally more in return games, they keep their strokes primed and ready to execute at important times.

does this help for what you are asking?

xFullCourtTenniSx
01-12-2010, 04:46 PM
So i'm definately a counter puncher... I basically grind my way out, hit shots with lot of topspin (due to western grip).. try move people around and will be very offensive when i have chance or feel confident.. My only downside is that my mental side is what is weak and sometimes don't have patience for long rallies and just frustrated and smack the ball out (obviously not on purpose but just frustrating).. i'll work on mental side but what would you say is your magic number where you see your opponents make errors? I can see if you have a stronger stroke then it wil lbe shorter while pushing styles will be longer since no heat but still as effected if you can last longer.....

I don't have a magic number... and i've read something that it's kind of good to have so you can have a mind set of having this amount of shots back in play ... not a necessity but any little tip does help..

50 sounds like a good number.

I personally like 10, or until I get the short ball or open court. But I'm an aggressive all court player, so my number is naturally on the low side...

GeorgeLucas
01-12-2010, 04:48 PM
"Don't even get me started on counter-punching"

-Roger Federer

Tennis_Monk
01-12-2010, 07:01 PM
I am a counter puncher too. I try to be oppurtunistic like most tennis players. If there is an open court OR if opponent is out of position, i try to rip a winner. Ofcourse i wont do this when i am break point down *smirks*.

If i am leading 5-0 in a set, obviously i will take big cuts at the ball and try a bunch of things.

If i am engaged in a neutral rally, i hit to opponents backhand three times before i go to forehand once and then back to backhand routine. I love long rallies and most opponents of mine know that i am very fit and can last lot longer.

There is a reason why i get smoked by people who love short rallies!

fps
01-13-2010, 02:55 AM
I'm thinking that if you are always willing and able to make your opponent hit 7 shots, you can beat 80-90% of opponents around your level. I try to teach students to rally 4-5 balls in rtn games before going on the attack (which can be another 2-4 shots). This helps them to stay in a rhythm and forces the server to really work to hold serve. If they are a good server (most of my students are) then the service points will be much shorter, but by trying to rally more in return games, they keep their strokes primed and ready to execute at important times.


it is always good to hit a lot of groundies and make your opponent work for it- even if he holds there's been no chance for your own shots to go off. i definitely use rhythm and try not to give too much for the first 3 or 4 shots, and when the opponent ups the pace i usually then decide what to do, either keep taking pace off or surprise by upping the pace. i can't understand the guys who just try to hit winners all the time, there's not as much joy in it, no psychological battering!

teppeiahn1
01-13-2010, 08:47 AM
Im a counterpuncher. I love it. small, compact strokes mixed with alot fo top spin. my movement is prety solid and i anticipat well so this style fits me very well. only thing that i can see not fitting is my 1hbh but it doesnt matter

larry10s
01-13-2010, 10:06 AM
I don't have a magic number... ..

thats good. the number for a counterpuncher is one more than your opponent. you should be willing and able to hit as many balls as it takes.

larry10s
01-13-2010, 10:08 AM
I am a counter puncher too..

There is a reason why i get smoked by people who love short rallies!

the reason must be is you give them an offensive opportunity ball early that they recognize and take advantage of

LeeD
01-13-2010, 10:19 AM
As said, I"m the opposite of the counterpuncher.
I like to hit the first ball for a forcing shot or winner, hating to let rallies last longer than 3 strokes each.
I might return you serve slow and high, backspun and short, but next ball, I"m looking to end the point. I don't care if you hit deep to my backhand, I just approach volley your shot from no man's land and move in DTL mostly.
Nothing better than hitting a WINNING ball, not winning by someone's loser.:shock::shock:
Of course, I lose all the time!

smoothtennis
01-13-2010, 10:34 AM
I'm thinking that if you are always willing and able to make your opponent hit 7 shots, you can beat 80-90% of opponents around your level. I try to teach students to rally 4-5 balls in rtn games before going on the attack (which can be another 2-4 shots). This helps them to stay in a rhythm and forces the server to really work to hold serve. If they are a good server (most of my students are) then the service points will be much shorter, but by trying to rally more in return games, they keep their strokes primed and ready to execute at important times.

does this help for what you are asking?

Yes - this approach is very successful for those with the mental discipline to execute it during a real match.

The funny thing is however which is a little ironic, is when I actually am able to implement this approach during a match, most of the time, I never actually get to start hitting my bigger better shots because the opponent will start making stupid shots after about 4 or 5 balls! The you feel like you played defence/neutral the whole time to win - which really isn't the case if they guy would extend the rallies.

I tend to be a counter puncher against equally skilled opponents at my level. I would estimate rallies go 4-5 balls before I try to start getting aggressive with the placement and pace. ANYTIME I see an opportunity ball however, I will go after it. Thanks Nick Bolliteri.