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86golf
01-13-2010, 09:17 AM
My nine year old daughter is weak and small framed for her age and I've been trying to teach her to hit double handed off both sides so she can get enough power to hit over the net from the baseline.
Since dad isn't a pro, and doesn't hit two handed off either side, I got her into a jr clinic (1X per week). They won't allow her to hit two handed off the dominate side.
I think she is digressing some and I'm not sure what to do. The next round of clinics will start soon and I need to make a decision. 1-Get her privates with a pro that will help her with the two handed strokes 2-stay with the clinics and hope that she eventually gets strong enough to hit 1 handed. 3-buy a ball machine and work with her myself.

What is the down-side of teaching double handed? FWIW-our head pro hits double handed off both sides in competitive matches and some of our best ladies hit double handed.

LeeD
01-13-2010, 10:24 AM
Tell your stupid, obstinate coach to talk to your head pro!
Nothing wrong with 2hFh if the person is small and still learning.
Some top players use 2hFh's, why not your daughter?
Don't be caught up by convention. That is the limiting factor. You cannot pass someone ahead of you if you insist on following directly their path.
As to your choices, talk to daugher and ask her what SHE wants to do.

Danstevens
01-13-2010, 10:39 AM
Double handed forehands can offer more power and better consistency but as with the 2 handed backhand, it probably has less power potential for stronger players than its one handed equivalent. It also limits reach slightly so to play well with it, especially at higher levels, you have to be quick.

A lot of children start off by hitting with two hands off both wings. Even Nadal started like this. Generally, coaches then develop the stroke in to a more conventional one handed forehand. As for how you want your daughter to learn the forehand, that decision will probably come down to you. With proper form, I see no reason why a 9 year old girl can't hit strokes from the baseline with relative ease. If she really can't get on with a single handed forehand then you could consider having her learn a two handed forehand - there's nothing inherently wrong with it, I just imagine that in the long term, she may get more out of playing with a one handed forehand as later on, if she wants to use the more conventional stroke, no change will be required.

I feel that it's probably for the best that you have a pro/coach of some sorts to teach your daughter to play. Without disrespect to you, it's best to instil good habits in to young players and the best type of person to do this is someone who is qualified and has the experience to do so. I recommend you invest in some lessons but practice with her at points during the week as well. If she's to really improve, your daughter needs to love tennis though - she should be the one begging you to go out and hit, not the other way around.

86golf
01-13-2010, 11:50 AM
DS-I do appreciate those comments and I certainly agree that a professional is far and away a better choice for teaching your own kids tennis. As to your last comment, I would have agreed with you a couple years ago but now I'm of the opinion that kids need to be pushed in certain directions. If I left it up to my daughter to do what she wants, she'd play Wii all day. My expectations are low. I'm not expecting a full ride at UNC or anything, just for her to get to a level that she can actually play with other kids when she is 12+. Or better yet, a level that mom and daughter can play that way dad can go play with his buddies:)

papa
01-13-2010, 04:18 PM
Yeah, I agree with LeeD and Danstevens on this. The one downside to this is changing later, if its desired or necessary. I know a very good player who used two hands on both sides, without changing grip, and has been doing it his entire tennis life. Although not a top prospect now he certainly was just a few years ago and was the room mate of a current top 25 player. He just figured that because of his height (maybe 5' "7") he wasn't going to make it to the top of tennis and become a lawyer instead. However, he still is a top player but doesn't get a chance to play as much as he would like - when he plays, he wins. More importantly, he's a first rate guy in every respect.

mel56
01-13-2010, 05:05 PM
It was by far their best shot. My daughter played d2 college tennis. The possible down side, is not developing as much power as a good 1hfh, and the 2hfh requires better faster footwork than a 1hfh.

Sumo
01-13-2010, 05:20 PM
My youngest brother sports the 2hfh, and learned if for the same reason your daughter is using it. He wasn't strong enough to hit with us using only one hand.

Now that he's 6-5, he's able to absolutely crush them. Definitely let her learn what she's comfortable with now. If she wants to switch it up down the line, it's easy.

acintya
05-28-2010, 03:19 PM
GRIPS, why is no one talking about grips? How can we play 2hfh if we dont know how to correct hold it?

86golf
05-28-2010, 04:50 PM
GRIPS, why is no one talking about grips? How can we play 2hfh if we dont know how to correct hold it?

My daughter is still doing well with the 2hfh and she is using an eastern rh low grip. Left hand is whatever is comfortable for her. We can actually rally now, but we still have lots of work to do, mostly footwork.

acintya
05-28-2010, 05:05 PM
I play with semi western at my bottom hand and on the top(non dominant hand) I use the eastern backhand grip - I hold the racquet with my left(upper) hand as I would hit a normal eastern backhand.

Can I play this way? The face is more closed and I get more spin that way.

armsty
05-28-2010, 05:49 PM
I don't really want to poke into this thread but I thought mentioning her age quickly wouldn't hurt.

I don't know how big she is, how the coaches/clubs work where you are. This is based on our club and our district's clubs ways.

At 9, GENERALLY speaking, kids (boys and girls) are hitting from halfway between the baseline and service line with lower compression balls and approx 25" rackets.

I know there's nothing wrong with the 2hfh and all this, we have a kid who joined our club for some lessons even though his dad is the head coach at a club in the same district. He was a small fella and played with 2 hands on both wings and was really awesome at it, so don't call me one eyed.

CoachingMastery
05-29-2010, 05:14 PM
My nine year old daughter is weak and small framed for her age and I've been trying to teach her to hit double handed off both sides so she can get enough power to hit over the net from the baseline.
Since dad isn't a pro, and doesn't hit two handed off either side, I got her into a jr clinic (1X per week). They won't allow her to hit two handed off the dominate side.
I think she is digressing some and I'm not sure what to do. The next round of clinics will start soon and I need to make a decision. 1-Get her privates with a pro that will help her with the two handed strokes 2-stay with the clinics and hope that she eventually gets strong enough to hit 1 handed. 3-buy a ball machine and work with her myself.

What is the down-side of teaching double handed? FWIW-our head pro hits double handed off both sides in competitive matches and some of our best ladies hit double handed.

I have taught the two handed forehand for over 17 years. This, out of 35 years teaching tennis. I can tell you from a pro who has been on both sides, that a PROPER two hander can enhance your daughter in so many ways. Obviously, you will hear from ignorant people who have no experience in teaching nor working with a wide range of players who, like those in the early 1970's said about the two-handed backhand that the two-handed forehand is a waste of time.

It is not. Certainly, there is the limitation of reach. But this is minimal and the use of the two-handed strokes encourages players to hit with better footwork and from a more balanced platform with a more stable swing pattern...not to mention the ability to control balls taken on the rise better, hit with better disguise, more angles in some cases, and with a more reliable swing pattern. Many also can generate more topspin, as well as flatten balls out more on command.

The most obviouse advantage is the limited use of wrist on the forehand. On top of this, the natural limitation of an "over" backswing, is helpful...one reason so many two-handers are great serve returners.

Learning a proper two-handed forehand can also be converted to a conventional one-handed forehand with ease. All two-handers usually develop a one-handed forehand for shots in trouble.

There are more than enough pros on tour now and top college players and top juniors who use a two-handed forehand to show it can indeed be taken to the top levels. There are many other variables that will prevent a player from reaching the top...using two hands will not be one of them.

My two books, Tennis Mastery and Coaching Mastery both are the only two books in the world that document, discuss, teach and demonstrate the two-handed forehand in detail. (Both books available here at TennisWarehouse.)

Tell your daughter to not let ignorant pros, (if they can even be called pros) deter her from developing a potential weapon...especially if A) She likes it, and B) she is better suited to hit it.

Good luck!

CoachingMastery
05-29-2010, 05:16 PM
P.S. on my previous post: I have four articles on TennisOne on the two-handed forehand as well as 7 articles documenting the training I used on my own 8-year old daughter, showing her stroke development. At 10, she could hit with with most college players, two hands both sides, as well as hit a slice and kick serve with a full sized racquet. Something to look at if you get a chance.

NLBwell
05-29-2010, 05:43 PM
Nothing wrong with teaching a two-handed forehand. I tend to be a traditionalist, but you have to adapt to the student's situation. I've even taught it to adults who have had problems with one-handers. To see them quickly start hitting the ball well after struggling for so long can be very gratifying.