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View Full Version : Anyone buy a stringer and then was sorry they did?


JackB1
01-20-2010, 12:36 PM
I am contemplating buying a stringer, but I keep questioning "is it really worth the trouble"? I restring 2 racquets maybe once a month and was considering buying a basic dropweight machine, but I am worried that I am wasting money. I pay $12 labor for each string job, so basically it comes down saving $24 per month and giving up a few hours each month I could be doing something else.

Just wondering if anyone else bought a stringer and then realized it was far easier to let the Proshop handle it?

VGP
01-20-2010, 12:49 PM
I've been reading your other thread asking about the Challenger I.....

Honestly, stringing isn't for everyone. If you find it to be a drag and are willing and able to pay someone else to do it, that's ok too.

At around $24 a month, you're looking at about $300 a year for yourself on stringing labor alone. That is if you extrapolate to the full 12 months.

Do you have a friend or someone with a stringing machine that would be willing to let you give it a go?

I see by your potential machine choices, you don't want to drop a lot of coin on a machine with the worry that it will just collect dust.

But, the good thing about a quality stringing machine is that it holds its value very well and you'd be able to easily recoup what you spent should you decide to sell.

Stringing labor where I am runs at $18 a frame. I took time off from playing for about 8 years, but after paying a couple of times, I decided to get my machine out of retirement.

kimguroo
01-20-2010, 12:50 PM
I am contemplating buying a stringer, but I keep questioning "is it really worth the trouble"? I restring 2 racquets maybe once a month and was considering buying a basic dropweight machine, but I am worried that I am wasting money. I pay $12 labor for each string job, so basically it comes down saving $24 per month and giving up a few hours each month I could be doing something else.

Just wondering if anyone else bought a stringer and then realized it was far easier to let the Proshop handle it?

I don't restrung very often but i have same dilemma.
since I use Prince o-port racket, I heard that I might need better string machine than basic simple drop weight machine. I need to spend at least $600 in order to string prince o-port racket easily. I might spend about $100 year so 6 years might be even. it's kind of hard decision whether buy the string machine or not but in your case, you spend $288 per a year. you should invest some $$$ towards to string machine.

mlewis721
01-20-2010, 12:52 PM
Here's an answer from the other side of the picture.... I string professionally and I have had several customers over the years who own machines bring their racquets to me. Most are extremely busy with work and family and can't spare the time. Only one disliked stringing itself.

Nanshiki
01-20-2010, 01:05 PM
Nope. Best and most important tennis-related purchase I ever made. Of course, I wish I had a nicer machine...

VGP
01-20-2010, 01:08 PM
Most are extremely busy with work and family and can't spare the time.

I was going to mention this too. We have three young ones and time can be an issue.

Some people try to couple their stringing with leisure time. Place your stringer near a TV or where you might listen to music......or if it's a nice day, bring it out on the deck or patio....maybe do it while chatting with friends.....just some suggestions.

JackB1
01-20-2010, 01:36 PM
I don't restrung very often but i have same dilemma.
since I use Prince o-port racket, I heard that I might need better string machine than basic simple drop weight machine. I need to spend at least $600 in order to string prince o-port racket easily. I might spend about $100 year so 6 years might be even. it's kind of hard decision whether buy the string machine or not but in your case, you spend $288 per a year. you should invest some $$$ towards to string machine.

The only thing you need for the Prince O-Ports or any of the Prince EXO racquets is a turntable with a brake. You dont need a $600 machine. I think the $130 Klippermate has a brake.

2handsbothsides
01-20-2010, 01:48 PM
I highly recommend getting something like a Klippermate to start. Low cost for quick payback and you are likely to be inclined to try other strings and tension more often. This can improve your game.

You can always have someone else string for you when your busy, but you will find that your own jobs will be more consistent. Your first few jobs will take a while, but after the first few its really no hassle and with a bit of work you can get this down to 30 to 35 minutes even on the simple drop weight. It also is a bit of fun if you are only doing a few.

mikeler
01-20-2010, 01:51 PM
Buy the machine. If you don't have time one week then pay the 12 bucks. I love stringing and need to restring about once per week. The convenience factor is not discussed much but it is nice knowing that you do not have to depend on someone else.

jswinf
01-20-2010, 01:52 PM
I bought an inexpensive machine (gamma x2) a few months ago and I'm glad I did, even though after an initial flurry of use it's obvious I won't use it real often, I'm not a break-strings-in-two-weeks kind of player.

I like stringing, though, I enjoy it. If it was a matter of saving money alone I don't think having and using a machine just for yourself makes a lot of sense, unless you break a lot of strings, like to experiment with different stuff, etc.

If you don't need restringing that often and aren't sure you'd enjoy or have the time to string for yourself, I don't think you're missing out on much to just keep getting your stringing done however suits you.

Icedorb217
01-20-2010, 02:16 PM
The only thing you need for the Prince O-Ports or any of the Prince EXO racquets is a turntable with a brake. You dont need a $600 machine. I think the $130 Klippermate has a brake.

The Klippermate does have a brake and that was one reason why i got it
and saying you have a EXO3 i think it be better for u. And dnt wrry its a great machine i have one and if you need help just email me

dberke
01-20-2010, 02:37 PM
A stringing mahine is a great investment. I bought a klippermate for about $100 5 years ago and it paid for itself in about 5 months. As for time...it only takes about 35 minutes to string a raquet. It might take you longer to drive to and from the tennis store depending on where you live.

Also, as other posters said...watch tv, listen to music while you string. I find it pretty relaxing. I also like knowing that I get a consistent, high quality job.

I've thought of getting a better stringing machine, but it really doesn't make sense financially because I just string my own racquets.

Ripper014
01-20-2010, 03:40 PM
Yep....... the only regret I have ever had was that I didn't purchase a better stringer. I have gone through 3 or 4 over my lifetime so far. I wish at some point I had just spent the money and got the one I wanted.

HitItHarder
01-20-2010, 04:05 PM
Buying my Revo 4000 was one of the best decisions I made. I have finally been able to try different strings, adjust tension, and find what I play the best with without having to worry about taking my racquets to a stringer.

Of course my whole family plays and I restring a racquet about every five or six days for someone, so I definately use mine and it will pay for itself in one year in labor cost savings. So everyone is different, but I would buy mine again in a heart beat.

kinsella
01-20-2010, 05:14 PM
I bought a NEOS for $1200 with tax and a tool kit in May of 1998. I have 880 string jobs out of it to date. In 2005 I added the $500 Wise electronic tension head. I am way ahead financially and I have tried all kinds of strings and tensions that I would not have if I had paid $25 (synth) - $60 (natural gut) for string jobs. I no longer have the tension of finding a way to get by the stringers or asking my wife to pick up a restrung racket.

If I sold the set up today, I would expect to get at least $1200 for it. You rarely see a good string machine for sale because they are purchased by an acquaintance before getting to the market.

TearSNFX
01-20-2010, 06:00 PM
Someone mentioned it before, it's not for everyone. I know some people who have purchased a stringer but because they hate stringing, they still pay to have it strung.

Here's why I purchased a stringer.

I used to use Hurricane Tour Pro / VS hybrid. On a weekly basis, I used to spend nearly 100 ~ 150 dollars just on stringing. Averaging out to 400 to 600 a month.

Upon purchasing my own stringer I've been using Gosen Polylon SP 17 and Micro 17 synthetic. I restring every time I have used my racket for over 2 hours. I won't say it's as good as the Hurricane pro + VS hybrid, but the differences are minor enough that I don't mind.

I went from having fresh strings every 2 ~ 3 days to having the option of having fresh strings whenever I feel like it, and at the fraction of the cost. I think I can squeeze out about 34 hybrid sets from 1 reel of SP and MICRO.

Hurricane Pro / VS : $400 ~ $600
Polylon SP 17 / Micro 17 : $92.50 ( including tax )

That's estimated at $2.72 per set. For a person who goes through strings often and who enjoys stringing. It would be crazy NOT to buy a stringer.

I recommend you try out stringing before you purchase one. I practiced on my friends hand crank stringer before I went ahead and purchased my electronic one. My only regret is not having $4000 to buy the top of the line stringer.

JT_2eighty
01-20-2010, 06:05 PM
A stringing mahine is a great investment. I bought a klippermate for about $100 5 years ago and it paid for itself in about 5 months. As for time...it only takes about 35 minutes to string a raquet. It might take you longer to drive to and from the tennis store depending on where you live.

Also, as other posters said...watch tv, listen to music while you string. I find it pretty relaxing. I also like knowing that I get a consistent, high quality job.

I've thought of getting a better stringing machine, but it really doesn't make sense financially because I just string my own racquets.

What he said. It's nice to have control over your stringbed with a basic dropweight.

Itagaki
01-20-2010, 07:24 PM
Yep....... the only regret I have ever had was that I didn't purchase a better stringer. I have gone through 3 or 4 over my lifetime so far. I wish at some point I had just spent the money and got the one I wanted.

I just recently got my stringer(SP Swing) and i kinda wish i had shelled out for the hip hop, i didnt realize how convenient fixed clamps would've been until i started

it takes me a long time to string, but i think the value is way worth it, and im sure ill get faster eventually

Icedorb217
01-20-2010, 07:53 PM
I think thats are only regret is not being able to buy an expensive machine but for most of us the ones we have work perfectly fine like for me im a junior player and a klippermate is perfect for me but I'd die for a revo 4000

yemenmocha
01-20-2010, 08:03 PM
Don't forget the cost and time of driving somewhere to drop off the racquet, and cost and time of picking it up. Also remember that many, many places have minimum wage kids doing their racquets who probably don't know what they're doing. I've also seen instances where racquets are not ready when they're supposed to be, so that's 3 trips in the car for one stringjob.

COPEY
01-20-2010, 08:18 PM
I am contemplating buying a stringer, but I keep questioning "is it really worth the trouble"? I restring 2 racquets maybe once a month and was considering buying a basic dropweight machine, but I am worried that I am wasting money. I pay $12 labor for each string job, so basically it comes down saving $24 per month and giving up a few hours each month I could be doing something else.

Just wondering if anyone else bought a stringer and then realized it was far easier to let the Proshop handle it?

Sounds like you're closer to talking yourself out of buying one than taking the plunge...which is fine, of course. I think VGP's suggestion to try it is a very good idea for someone with your reservations. Me - I didn't have to try it; I knew I wanted one. What I didn't know is how much I'd come to really enjoy it, so that was a pleasant surprise.

It's already been said, but even if you buy a low-end machine and decide you'd rather pay someone else to string for you, you won't have wasted your money. There's ALWAYS someone looking for a stringer, so unloading it will be the least of your problems.

Anyway, goodluck with your decision. I'm off to string a racquet (trying Mantis Power Synthetic) and watch a little Australian Open. ;)

raiden031
01-20-2010, 08:23 PM
I bought the Klippermate for like $140 like 3 years ago and it was one of the best investments I've ever made. I buy string in reels where I can string each racquet for about $3.

It seems like the cost of labor can be steep if you restring alot. I know people who take it to a pro shop at a club and pay like $40 for a string job (now I don't know the cost of string vs. labor but that seems high regardless).

baek57
01-20-2010, 09:46 PM
Is stringing worth your time? If you get a cheap dropweight it can take up to an hour to get a frame done. Yeah, you're going to 'save' $12, but you are spending an hour to get it done. If you have other things you'd rather be doing maybe it's not worth it. If stringing is something that you think you'd enjoy doing or you want to do it yourself so you know you'll get a consistent stringing job done, then it can be worth it for sure. At the same time there is a certain convenience factor that you can string your racquet on your own schedule, and not on someone elses.

rosheem
01-21-2010, 04:23 AM
Do you like to play around with different string/tension setups? During my first year of stringing for myself on my little drop weight, I had lots of fun with different setups, tensions, and stringing techniques. Once I finally dialed in my desired setup and started stringing with the same strings, same tensions, same technique every time, the process did start to lose some of its magic.

That said, I still really enjoy it and love the idea of being able to string up a fresh job whenever I want. It's much more fun in the summer, when I can do it outside.

goran_ace
01-21-2010, 06:25 AM
A stringing machine is probably the best investment I ever made in tennis. My only regret is that I didn't ask my parents to buy me one when I was a teenager and my string-breaking habit was at its peak. The guy who used to do my rackets jokingly said doing my rackets put him through college.

VGP
01-21-2010, 06:48 AM
The guy who used to do my rackets jokingly said doing my rackets put him through college.

I'm sure he wasn't joking. Beer money is essential for getting through college.

wao
01-21-2010, 08:58 AM
I am contemplating buying a stringer, but I keep questioning "is it really worth the trouble"? I restring 2 racquets maybe once a month and was considering buying a basic dropweight machine, but I am worried that I am wasting money. I pay $12 labor for each string job, so basically it comes down saving $24 per month and giving up a few hours each month I could be doing something else.

Just wondering if anyone else bought a stringer and then realized it was far easier to let the Proshop handle it?NO, I bought a used Neos from a place that repairs them for the major manufacturers and couldn't be happier. There is the cost vs the amount you have to restring. A stringer gives you more flexability to try different string combinations and tensions with just having to pay for the strings. Good luck in what ever your choice is.

Lefty5
01-21-2010, 09:59 AM
taking your racket to a stringer is all fine until you inevitably start monkeying with different strings, hybrids, tensions, etc... Then it gets expensive and time consuming just to drop off and pick up. This only heightens when you switch frames, thus bringing on many more options to play with. I feel less guilty about cutting out a bad combo or wrong tension if i just do it myself. Buy value strings (i.e. stay away from Lux, Gamma, etc..), string yourself, and find your best combo. There's always a stringer around the corner willing to help if you get busy in life, but you'll always have your stringer for when you want to experiment.

masterxfob
01-21-2010, 10:16 AM
Is stringing worth your time? If you get a cheap dropweight it can take up to an hour to get a frame done. Yeah, you're going to 'save' $12, but you are spending an hour to get it done. If you have other things you'd rather be doing maybe it's not worth it. If stringing is something that you think you'd enjoy doing or you want to do it yourself so you know you'll get a consistent stringing job done, then it can be worth it for sure. At the same time there is a certain convenience factor that you can string your racquet on your own schedule, and not on someone elses.

these are the two frames i use and string the most so i am quite familiar with them. the 16x18 with syn gut takes 20 minutes and the 18x20 with syn gut takes 30 minutes with my cheap klippermate dropweight. of course it takes longer when i use poly or nat gut or even when i string up a frame i'm not all that familiar with, but i'm happy with the cheap syn gut.

the local shop is only about five miles away from me, but they charge $16 labor plus string, which they marked up 25%. so i saved some money which is great, but even better is that i am sure of the quality and consistency of my work.

if you're a fairly decent player and are serious about the game, you should get one. if you've ever played like crap and then wondered if it's due to a poor string job, you should get one. that way, you can only blame yourself when you don't play well.

LttlElvis
01-21-2010, 12:01 PM
My only regret about buying a stringer is that each time, I wish I bought a more expensive stringer with more features. Over the years, as my income increased, I was able to afford more. Whatever stringer you decide to buy, it will pay for itself if you want it to. Nearly 30 yrs ago, I bought the cheapest stringer on the market ($80). The Klippermate was the 2nd cheapest. It paid for itself within a couple of days. Had I bought a $1200 Prince Neos/Ektelon at the time, it would have taken longer, but I know it would have paid for itself sooner or later. If you are stringing 2 times a month, you can invest in a brand new Klippermate and it will pay for itself before the end of a year. If you don't like stringing by then, you can either sell or give away the Klippermate. You wouldn't have lost anything.

By the way, your game gets better because you are able to fine tune your own racquet by experimenting with different strings.

Superman1272
01-21-2010, 12:51 PM
Nope. Best and most important tennis-related purchase I ever made. Of course, I wish I had a nicer machine...

+1 ON THIS!

I received a Klippermate for my birthday last year and have been loving it. I am more aware of an important part of my gear and am able to tinker around as often as I want. It is not so much a "convenience" thing as it is that I really enjoy stringing racquet. I string mine and friends'. I charge them the price of the string and 10 bucks for my time. I'm not getting rich off of it, but I am doing something with my time that I enjoy.

Richie Rich
01-21-2010, 01:40 PM
i don't regret for a second shelling out for my used Star 3. i string for myself and a couple other guys only. but it's paid for itself alrady. buy the best machine you can afford. you won't regret it

Meaghan
01-21-2010, 01:51 PM
i don't regret for a second shelling out for my used Star 3. i string for myself and a couple other guys only. but it's paid for itself alrady. buy the best machine you can afford. you won't regret it

I agree, My stringer is very good but it can take him a full week to get my racket back. Where i live there are several stringers but i trust this guy and he does a great job.

I want my own machine Im finding I want to change strings every couple of weeks and i cant wait a week for a restring. I understand tho cos he's busy with work too.

Go for it Jack get one you can afford and string your own and a couple of ur friends.

eagle
01-21-2010, 02:02 PM
Yes, I was sorry.

Sorry I didn't buy one sooner and experience the freedom of stringing my racquets the way I want, with the strings I want, and when I want.

It was costing me $40 each time going to a pro stringer. With a reel of the Gosen Micro, it costs me less than $5 to do so.

http://www.keohi.com/tennis

r,
eagle

ac3111
01-21-2010, 04:35 PM
Are there Automated stringer machines where you mount the racquet on the machine and then by pressing a button after setting the string tension it does it all by it self?

bfactor61
01-21-2010, 04:52 PM
Its a good idea....I got a klippermate and I love it. It does the job, now i can string racquets for myself and teammates

Icedorb217
01-21-2010, 05:08 PM
As most people are saying they just regret not being able to get a better machine and in my case im gonna be in high school next year and i can barely break syn gut but i know when im playin next year im break em like crazy so buying a stringing machine was a great investment for me

ac3111
01-21-2010, 05:09 PM
I can't break syn gut. Does that mean I have not been in high school yet?

Icedorb217
01-21-2010, 09:41 PM
I can't break syn gut. Does that mean I have not been in high school yet?

uhh no

10 char

TearSNFX
01-22-2010, 07:00 AM
Don't forget the cost and time of driving somewhere to drop off the racquet, and cost and time of picking it up. Also remember that many, many places have minimum wage kids doing their racquets who probably don't know what they're doing. I've also seen instances where racquets are not ready when they're supposed to be, so that's 3 trips in the car for one stringjob.

I vouch for this, I've entrusted one of my Racquets to be strung with Babolat VS 17 gauge before, the person that strung it just pulled the natural gut like it was Synthetic and it was frayed and destroyed. By the time I got it, it looked like it went through a grinder. The owner was kind enough to tell me go pop the strings and he'll supply a new set of babolat strings after I pop it.

The strings popped in 15 minutes of play T.T I would have topped out by just restringing right then and there lol.

Itagaki
01-22-2010, 07:00 AM
Are there Automated stringer machines where you mount the racquet on the machine and then by pressing a button after setting the string tension it does it all by it self?

if you're saying what i think you're saying, then no, pretty sure there arent

TearSNFX
01-22-2010, 07:05 AM
Please don't purchase a drop weight....

Save up a bit more and at least get a crank.

I was patient enough to save up for about 6 months to buy an electronic one and it's A LOT more comfortable to string then the crank I was practicing on that's for sure.

JackB1
01-22-2010, 07:05 AM
if you're saying what i think you're saying, then no, pretty sure there arent

yes, they are called electric machines

Superman1272
01-22-2010, 08:19 AM
Please don't purchase a drop weight....

Save up a bit more and at least get a crank.

I was patient enough to save up for about 6 months to buy an electronic one and it's A LOT more comfortable to string then the crank I was practicing on that's for sure.

Sorry. I disaggree. The drop-weight Klippermate I have is wonderful and does a GREAT job. It is not as fast as the high dollar machines (albeit only about 10-15 minutes faster for someone who is familiar with the electric stringer) but for the money, it is a great machine. It can replicate results consistenly time after time. That is the most important aspect when buying a machine. Can you get the same results over and over. Unless you are planning on stringing multiple racquets a day, I would not worry about the high dollar machines. A simple drop weight will do you fine.

Papa Mango
01-22-2010, 09:35 AM
I really regret it, because 2 years later I have not settled on a string/tension for myself! No 2 stringjobs have ever been the same.
Before I got my stringer, it was the cheapest string/labor deal for me.

On the other hand saved a lot of money as I am frequent string breaker and made some beer money stringing for some ppl as well.

Hoping to upgrade my Reve 4000 with the WISE this year!

Itagaki
01-22-2010, 09:52 AM
yes, they are called electric machines

i might have misunderstood the question, but i read that as him asking if there was a machine that does ALL the work, not just pull tension automatically

goran_ace
01-22-2010, 10:05 AM
I don't think there's anything wrong with buying a drop weight machine either. In fact, I would prefer drop weight over a crank because of the constant pull. If money is a limiting factor you can't beat drop weight machins in terms of value.

If I had to choose, I would say moving up to fixed clamps would be more important than moving up from a dropweight to a crank or electronic tensioner.

FedererForehand
01-22-2010, 10:45 AM
For what its worth (without having read through all of the other threads). I bought my Gamma X2 in December and I'm happy I did. It all comes down to weather or not its something you think would be fun to do. I don't string a lot of frames but knew I would enjoy doing it. So if I only string up a few every now and then it was a good investment for me.

My days of playing serious tennis are over but I still enjoy having a freshly strung stick now and again and its fun to play around with different set ups and I hope eventually my friends will allow me to string for them and I hope my daughters will also pick up on tennis so I'd also string for them as well.

The nice thing about a drop weight is they are cheap and if you decide you don't like stinging then your really not out too much money and you can always find someone to sell it to.

ladude1957
01-22-2010, 11:07 AM
Buy the machine. If you don't have time one week then pay the 12 bucks. I love stringing and need to restring about once per week. The convenience factor is not discussed much but it is nice knowing that you do not have to depend on someone else.

The convenience factor is major. If do not live near a ProShop you can spend loads of time and gas money making trips to drop off your frame and then have to pick it up two days later. It was major factor for me. Having said that, I do not love to string, but try to do it while doing something else as someone else posted above.

ladude1957
01-22-2010, 11:10 AM
I don't think there's anything wrong with buying a drop weight machine either. In fact, I would prefer drop weight over a crank because of the constant pull. If money is a limiting factor you can't beat drop weight machins in terms of value.

If I had to choose, I would say moving up to fixed clamps would be more important than moving up from a dropweight to a crank or electronic tensioner.

Fixed clamps are a more important feature than crank vs dropweight in producing a more consistant string job.

topanlego
01-22-2010, 11:48 AM
Fixed clamps are a more important feature than crank vs dropweight in producing a more consistant string job.

Sorry... Practice and experience is the most important feature. Too bad you can't buy either.

mikeler
01-22-2010, 11:48 AM
The convenience factor is major. If do not live near a ProShop you can spend loads of time and gas money making trips to drop off your frame and then have to pick it up two days later. It was major factor for me. Having said that, I do not love to string, but try to do it while doing something else as someone else posted above.


I still enjoy it for the most part but I usually partake in a beer or two with something on the TV to enhance the whole experience.

bad_call
01-22-2010, 12:02 PM
Sorry. I disaggree. The drop-weight Klippermate I have is wonderful and does a GREAT job. It is not as fast as the high dollar machines (albeit only about 10-15 minutes faster for someone who is familiar with the electric stringer) but for the money, it is a great machine. It can replicate results consistenly time after time. That is the most important aspect when buying a machine. Can you get the same results over and over. Unless you are planning on stringing multiple racquets a day, I would not worry about the high dollar machines. A simple drop weight will do you fine.

no argument here. should have bought one sooner...can't have enough good tools.

JT_2eighty
01-22-2010, 12:12 PM
I still enjoy it for the most part but I usually partake in a beer or two with something on the TV to enhance the whole experience.

That's my strategy as well. Weaving can be tedious towards the end, especially with poly, but in all it's nice for the convenience and knowing that you are the one to blame or praise when a stringjob goes sour or great!

That said, a beer or two is good, as one time instead of beer I was drinking whisky and let's just say that's a recipie for disaster. Almost 3 hours to string a frame, but I guess I was having fun! (it was a friend's frame at that, full poly, but he's raving about the WC silverstring I suggested, and I omitted the drunken stringing part of the story to him... although I did warn him to watch the knots and that I would replace the job if they came undone, which they didn't).

Oh and the best part of the drop weight is that consistency, as long as you clamp well you won't have to calibrate gravity!

mikeler
01-22-2010, 12:59 PM
Weaving the last 3 strings on my PST is no fun. I finally got around to purchasing a starting clamp today to keep the starting knot from sinking in the grommet since I string them 2 piece.

Marshredder
01-22-2010, 01:04 PM
I string the 4 racquets I use for tournaments maybe once or twice a month, I should really really buy a stringer, I'd make mymoney back in a couple of months, its just... I cant be bothered?

armsty
01-22-2010, 01:18 PM
$24 a month? Say a machine is $400 for you, so that's about 18 months till your money's back. Having said that, do you have the time to learn and then do it.

A good way to make money out of it is to get your name out there for people. Free labor for first half a dozen people if they pay for string and get your name around worked for me.

leafscat
01-22-2010, 01:21 PM
Weaving the last 3 strings on my PST is no fun. I finally got around to purchasing a starting clamp today to keep the starting knot from sinking in the grommet since I string them 2 piece.

After a while you will wonder how you lived without it!

I agree with many of the others that fixed clamps are more important than dropweight vs crank. I have a dropweight (with fixed clamps) and like that I get constant pull and don't need to worry about calibrating.

I also looked for quite some time before purchasing and noticed that used stringers in decent shape sell very quickly. Bottom line, not much risk in buying. If it is not for you just sell the machine.

mikeler
01-22-2010, 01:21 PM
Sounds like the OP has limited time, so I think he/she will only be doing their own sticks.

mikeler
01-22-2010, 01:23 PM
Calibrating my crank machine is no big deal. You don't have to do it every time.

Hominator
01-22-2010, 02:06 PM
Calibrating my crank machine is no big deal. You don't have to do it every time.

How often are you supposed to calibrate a crank machine and what is involved? Thanks.

mikeler
01-22-2010, 04:03 PM
How often are you supposed to calibrate a crank machine and what is involved? Thanks.


I think YULitle recommended every 25 string jobs if you don't move your stringer around much. So I checked mine when I was playing poorly after about 30 jobs and sure enough, it was 4 pounds low. I bought a Gamma calibrator from TW shown in the picture below. I have not had to calibrate since then. The calibration involves adjusting a set screw on the tensioner. It took maybe 2 or 3 minutes. You just pull tension with the strings on the calibrator attached to a clamp and see if the tension on the calibrator matches what you have it set for and then play around with the set screw from there.

http://img.tennis-warehouse.com/new_product/TENCAL-1.jpg

LanEvo
01-22-2010, 08:51 PM
got a question, do dropweights need to be calibrated ? bc i have use dmine for a while already, but not sure if im actually getting the said tension the bar, so is there anyway to check? or do i just have to buy a tension checker?

Zhou
01-22-2010, 09:44 PM
Drop weights only need to be calibrated once. Usually they don't vary much with the bar unless you drop it or something. Pretty much you should be fine as long as you don't drop the stringer.

blue12
01-22-2010, 10:00 PM
gamma X2 rocks. I've had one for like 4 years. I think Gamma is the best brand for drop weights. If you buy one for like 130 or 150 i'm sure you could sell it for 100 and not lose much, if you decided stringing isn't for you.

ladude1957
01-23-2010, 01:12 AM
Sorry... Practice and experience is the most important feature. Too bad you can't buy either.

Sorry...While I agree that practice and experience are very important. All things being equal, fixed clamps are better than flying clamps. That was my point. Practice and experience are not a feature of a stringing machine. They are a feature of the person doing the stringing. Since you own a StringPal you may have experience only with a lower end stringing machine. Drop weight vs Crank is more about speed.

brownbearfalling
01-23-2010, 10:50 AM
JACKB1:

Please Please take into consideration how much you love to play tennis. If you know you are going to playing or around the sport forever, the stringer will pay for itself. In the case that you do find something else or lose the time to play tennis, a stringer gathering dust in a garage is very sad.