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View Full Version : How big of a deal is it to string a racket one-piece, when it calls for two-piece?


aksman
01-20-2010, 09:57 PM
How big of a deal is it to string a racket one-piece, when it calls for two-piece?

dancraig
01-20-2010, 10:39 PM
It may have called for two piece because if done one piece the mains will end at the bottom. Many stringers will not know how to avoid stringing crossses bottom up, by using an "Around The World" method, so the company plays it safe by calling for two piece.

Valjean
01-21-2010, 08:26 AM
It can void the warranty; you decide, and can, how much that matters, if you string your own. Otherwise, for you it's a calculated risk; I've known retail shops to refuse to follow a two-piece manufacturer's requirement, though, despite being notified of one by a racquet's owner when it's been brought in for service. You accept the risk, with them, then, when you proceed. Obviously it's a good idea to learn what they do, not just assume it.

Rabbit
01-21-2010, 08:28 AM
^^^^
Yeah, I see more and more retail places just going throat to tip. They contend it doesn't hurt the frame.

LPShanet
01-23-2010, 04:59 AM
It can void the warranty; you decide, and can, how much that matters, if you string your own. Otherwise, for you it's a calculated risk; I've known retail shops to refuse to follow a two-piece manufacturer's requirement, though, despite being notified of one by a racquet's owner when it's been brought in for service. You accept the risk, with them, then, when you proceed. Obviously it's a good idea to learn what they do, not just assume it.

I second all of the above. I'd also add that it makes a difference what tension you're stringing at. Any potential problems will be exacerbated the higher you go in tension. Also, every racquet is different in construction, so some will be at greater risk than others. Feel free to give us specific info and we'll try to give a more specific answer.

ace0001a
01-23-2010, 05:57 AM
From my experience, I've probably strung most of my racquets in a once piece with the crosses starting at the bottom. I only recently discovered that doing so "can cause excessive stress to the frame" and is why many racquet companies require you to do a two peice job if you care about the racquet's warranty. I've been using a trusty Klippermate tabletop stringer for almost 20 years now and have never had a problem with any racquets I've strung on it. I've even accidentally mounted racquets incorrectly on it before with no problems like frame warping. Some have said I've been lucky and maybe that's the case. All I know is that I've strung many racquets in a one piece job with cross strings starting at the bottom of the head without any problems and most were suppose to be done as a two peice with crosses started at the top the head (but again, I didn't know this at the time). I know I recently strung a really beatup Yamaha Secret EX racquet that way and it didn't break or warp on me. But in the end, you as the stringer take the calculated risk in doing whatever way you chose to string your racquets.

dancraig
01-23-2010, 10:19 PM
Here is a simple and easy to remember ATW pattern. I suppose all patterns have pros and cons, but this one surely accomplishes the "top down" goal.
When you finish the mains and see that the crosses will be done from the bottom up, don't string the last long side main. This will leave you at the top of the frame. If the racquet has an odd number of crosses, start weaving at the second cross. You will string that first cross a little later. If the racquet has an even number of crosses, start weaving at the first cross. When you get to the end of the crosses, weave that main you skipped back up to the top of the racquet. If you are finished, tie off. If you skipped the first cross earlier, weave that and tie off.

ace0001a
01-24-2010, 02:08 AM
I heard some racquet companies wouldn't warranty a racquet that has been strung with an ATW pattern as well, so I guess the only benefit from it is less tie offs.

jim e
01-24-2010, 08:25 AM
I heard some racquet companies wouldn't warranty a racquet that has been strung with an ATW pattern as well, so I guess the only benefit from it is less tie offs.

While it is true that Head requires 2 piece stringing for their preformance racquets. (Aug. 2008 of RSI mag. from the USRSA), stated: "ATW or box pattern, where you might have a 90- or 270-degree turn between a main and a cross, which could break through a section of the frame where the grommets are close together........ Head would have the option of denying the warranty claim due to the one-piece string job."

But you do get the benefit of stringing top down with the ATW pattern, and that places a lot less stress on the racquet.

Because of the popularity of hybrids,
and Head recommendations for 2 piece stringing,
and I also string a lot of nat. gut,( and I usually string gut as 2 piece as that is less handeling of gut that way),
with all that , I normally string the majority of string jobs as 2 piece.

TennezSport
01-24-2010, 09:04 AM
I would like to back up what JimE stated about Head racquets and add that Yonex, Tecnifibre and some Prince models are in the same boat. You will void the warranty if the racquet breaks. Wilson is the only company that says they don't care if you string bottom up. However, if you want to maintain racquet shape and integrity, you never never never string bottom up.

Cheers, TennezSport :cool:

coyfish
01-24-2010, 09:07 AM
Why don't you just 2 piece string. Its not any harder and won't take more time . . .

I guess the only pain is having to measure out / cut the 2 sets.

aksman
01-24-2010, 01:10 PM
Why don't you just 2 piece string. Its not any harder and won't take more time . . .

I guess the only pain is having to measure out / cut the 2 sets.


Actually, I was just wondering because a racket of mine came back from my stringer 1-piece instead of 2, and I was wondering if this was an issue.

DownTheLine
01-24-2010, 01:13 PM
I heard some racquet companies wouldn't warranty a racquet that has been strung with an ATW pattern as well, so I guess the only benefit from it is less tie offs.

How would they know?

jim e
01-24-2010, 01:39 PM
I heard some racquet companies wouldn't warranty a racquet that has been strung with an ATW pattern as well, so I guess the only benefit from it is less tie offs.
How would they know?

They would know.
That can easily be noticed even if the strings are cut out, as a 90- or 270-degree turn between a main and a cross, which could break through a section of the frame where the grommets are close together would never happen with a 2 piece as those close together grommets are never bridged across with the string with a 2 piece job, so it could never break through.

dancraig
01-24-2010, 06:16 PM
Why don't you just 2 piece string. Its not any harder and won't take more time . . .

I guess the only pain is having to measure out / cut the 2 sets.

My "default" stringing method is one piece ATW, except for hybrid and gut.
I pull seven quick wingspan lengths, off a reel, and I have my string. Two quick wingspan pulls gives me the shortside. I never have to look up string lengths. I never have to walk across the room to equal the mains and I never string bottom up. If you are stringing one or two frames it probably doesn't matter. If you string a lot of racquets it helps to simplify the routine.
If I see a reason to use a different method, I do.