PDA

View Full Version : Comment on my stringing technique


aimr75
01-22-2010, 07:24 PM
Can anyone comment on my stringing technique for this 2 piece string job? Was hoping for any feedback on whether i'm doing anything wrong or poorly.

There are sections that ive sped up/cut so you dont have to watch the whole thing

Mains:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aBXrms4230

Crosses
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdIy_xhRAjI

It was mentioned in another thread i wasnt doing my mains correctly, so hopefully i've corrected it in this vid

If anyone is interested, the actual stringing time took 23 minutes for this racquet, but that doesnt include cutting strings out, mounting etc

LttlElvis
01-22-2010, 09:05 PM
The initial anchor clamp needs to be closer to the frame. Why did you start in the middle? It's like you never had a direct pull on the 2nd center main string, which can lead to inconsistent tension.

Otherwise, everything else looked good. Nice machine.

aimr75
01-22-2010, 09:12 PM
The initial anchor clamp needs to be closer to the frame. Why did you start in the middle? It's like you never had a direct pull on the 2nd center main string, which can lead to inconsistent tension.

Otherwise, everything else looked good. Nice machine.

yeah i sort of did it that way because it gets fairly cramped with the starting clamp and the first clamp i place for the 1st tension pull when they are both close to the frame, thats really the only reason..

will try get it closer to the frame in future, thanks

Zhou
01-22-2010, 09:15 PM
I agree with LttlElvis...

Your initial pull starting the mains is awkward where it is recommended to set your anchor much closer to the far side of the frame (in this case the throat). So say you pull the left main, you should set the anchor clamp close to the throat on the right side. No need to give any space as you have fixed clamps so get it right up next to the frame.

Jonny S&V
01-22-2010, 09:15 PM
On the second main you tensioned, don't put the string over the frame, put it under. If you have to put the string over the frame, put a business card or something of that thickness in-between the frame and the string, this'll protect the paint of the throat. Wish I had that nice of a stringer though. :-(

Zhou
01-22-2010, 09:22 PM
Also ewww to the start on the crosses.

You have a starting clamp and you might as well use it to start your crosses. The problem is you used a double half hitch knot which is a finishing knot and not meant to endure full tension of a pull. If you are using a starting knot, make sure it is a starting knot.

aimr75
01-22-2010, 09:22 PM
I agree with LttlElvis...

Your initial pull starting the mains is awkward where it is recommended to set your anchor much closer to the far side of the frame (in this case the throat). So say you pull the left main, you should set the anchor clamp close to the throat on the right side. No need to give any space as you have fixed clamps so get it right up next to the frame.

ah right, so on the first pull, the anchor should be at the throat, thanks! i think i misunderstood what LttlElvis meant in terms of the location, cheers

On the second main you tensioned, don't put the string over the frame, put it under. If you have to put the string over the frame, put a business card or something of that thickness in-between the frame and the string, this'll protect the paint of the throat. Wish I had that nice of a stringer though. :-(

thanks for that tip, will try putting it under the frame next time



thanks for the responses, this is the sort of stuff i was wanting to get feedback on

aimr75
01-22-2010, 09:27 PM
Also ewww to the start on the crosses.

You have a starting clamp and you might as well use it to start your crosses. The problem is you used a double half hitch knot which is a finishing knot and not meant to endure full tension of a pull. If you are using a starting knot, make sure it is a starting knot.

is a starting clamp really required to start crosses?

I thought the type of knot required is dependent on how large the hole is or the type of string being used.. for example, i always use a bulky knot with syn guts, muiltis since they are softer and can slip

Ive never had an issue using a parnell knot with poly crosses unless the hole is very large

Zhou
01-22-2010, 09:38 PM
is a starting clamp really required to start crosses?

I thought the type of knot required is dependent on how large the hole is or the type of string being used.. for example, i always use a bulky knot with syn guts, muiltis since they are softer and can slip

Ive never had an issue using a parnell knot with poly crosses unless the hole is very large

If you have a starting clamp it is something you might as well use as it is very helpful. And it is arguable it produces a more even string bed

The type of knot isn't dependent on the size of the hole but dependent on use. The direct pull tension on a parnell/ double half hitch is not recommended. A starting knot is used because it is large enough and stronger to withstand the pressure of a direct pull.

Jonny S&V
01-22-2010, 09:39 PM
is a starting clamp really required to start crosses?

I thought the type of knot required is dependent on how large the hole is or the type of string being used.. for example, i always use a bulky knot with syn guts, muiltis since they are softer and can slip

Ive never had an issue using a parnell knot with poly crosses unless the hole is very large

It's far safer to use a bulky knot on the starting knots then a double half-hitch or a Parnell. One thing that I noticed that may help you is you should keep tension on the tie-offs until you release the clamps.

LttlElvis
01-22-2010, 09:43 PM
is a starting clamp really required to start crosses?

I thought the type of knot required is dependent on how large the hole is or the type of string being used.. for example, i always use a bulky knot with syn guts, muiltis since they are softer and can slip

Ive never had an issue using a parnell knot with poly crosses unless the hole is very large

I agree. A starting clamp is not really necessary to start the crosses. Using it does help prevent that starting knot from slipping into the grommet. There are techniques to avoid using a starting clamp on the crosses such as using the proper knot or just knowing the size hole won't be an issue. Only time and practice will make you know the correct situation.

I knew one stringer who progressively increased the first 3 cross string pulls. The first was relatively low, the second was medium, and the third was the desired tension. The first pull was low to prevent the knot from slipping or damaging the grommet.

Personally, my first pull on the 1st cross string is 30 lbs. The second is my desired tension. I really don't like using a starting clamp to start my crosses. There are reasons that may be too long for me to explain. The way I do it may not be standard procedures, but I have found it to work for me.

aimr75
01-22-2010, 09:44 PM
It's far safer to use a bulky knot on the starting knots then a double half-hitch or a Parnell. One thing that I noticed that may help you is you should keep tension on the tie-offs until you release the clamps.

I remember YUlitle mentioning he uses Parnell on all knots, hence why i did it too

on that last comment, can you elaborate? dont quite follow, i.e. keeping tension on tie-off until releasing clamps

aimr75
01-22-2010, 09:44 PM
^ looked up that thread where YUlitle commented

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=3727327&postcount=4

Zhou
01-22-2010, 09:47 PM
I remember YUlitle mentioning he uses Parnell on all knots, hence why i did it too

on that last comment, can you elaborate? dont quite follow, i.e. keeping tension on tie-off until releasing clamps

YULitle uses parnell knots because he uses a starting clamp for the first cross and the last three are finishing knots.

I believe he was referring to putting pressure on the end of the knot and releasing the clamp as you hold pressure using say a starting clamp... And then once you release the clamp then cut the tail.

* Back on starting the crosses. Its personal preference if you use a starting clamp, I personally prefer one. But if you prefer a starting knot, I would use the proper knot and just double pull the first cross is what I advise.

rich s
01-23-2010, 05:11 AM
Can anyone comment on my stringing technique for this 2 piece string job? Was hoping for any feedback on whether i'm doing anything wrong or poorly.

There are sections that ive sped up/cut so you dont have to watch the whole thing

Mains:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aBXrms4230

Crosses
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdIy_xhRAjI

It was mentioned in another thread i wasnt doing my mains correctly, so hopefully i've corrected it in this vid

If anyone is interested, the actual stringing time took 23 minutes for this racquet, but that doesnt include cutting strings out, mounting etc

I only watched the first bit of the mains.......

You didn't tension Left Main #1......

You tensioned right main #1 then right main #2 and then left main #2, you never tensioned left main number one.....

The anchor clamp should be closer to the throat on left main #1 instead of closer to the tip and since you have a starting clamp I would use that to anchor left main #1 insead of the fixed clamp.....

Also..... pull your strings under the frame not over the top..... since your machine has 360 rotation the gripper is sitting below the plane of the string bed so it is better to pull the string under the frame than over the top of the frame...... this will reduce friction loss on the pulls that rub across the frame.

82300sd
01-23-2010, 07:24 AM
I am confused why there is a starting clamp inside the racquet when doing the mains, isn't the regular clamp sufficient as an anchor clamp? I've only strung about 12 racquets, so I am new.

Zhou
01-23-2010, 07:31 AM
I am confused why there is a starting clamp inside the racquet when doing the mains, isn't the regular clamp sufficient as an anchor clamp? I've only strung about 12 racquets, so I am new.

It is not necessary but it doesn't hurt to have the starting clamp as insurance that the string won't slip.

Bottom line it isn't necessary.

82300sd
01-23-2010, 07:37 AM
won't the starting clamp inside the frame sometimes deform and flatten the string since there is no way to control how tight or loose the starting clamp closes?

Zhou
01-23-2010, 07:47 AM
won't the starting clamp inside the frame sometimes deform and flatten the string since there is no way to control how tight or loose the starting clamp closes?

Starting clamps are gentle enough on the string that it won't deform the string.

uk_skippy
01-23-2010, 08:20 AM
I only watched the first bit of the mains.......

You didn't tension Left Main #1......

You tensioned right main #1 then right main #2 and then left main #2, you never tensioned left main number one.....

The anchor clamp should be closer to the throat on left main #1 instead of closer to the tip and since you have a starting clamp I would use that to anchor left main #1 insead of the fixed clamp.....

Also..... pull your strings under the frame not over the top..... since your machine has 360 rotation the gripper is sitting below the plane of the string bed so it is better to pull the string under the frame than over the top of the frame...... this will reduce friction loss on the pulls that rub across the frame.

I agree to a point. In fact what he does is set one machine clamp 3/4 up the string (backed up by a starting clamp) on Left 1, and then tensions right 1. In effect tensioning 1 & 3/4 strings i.e. the centre 2 mains. This is not a good way to start. When watching if for the 1st time I expected the OP to do a different process due to the incorrect tensioning of the centre 2 mains, but it didn't happen.

Also agree with the string having to go under the frame to reduce friction, and poss frame damage.

When cutting off the excess string at the end I wouldn't do with the point of the cutters going towards the frame so as to reduce the chance of frame damage.

Personally, I don't use a starting knot, but use the starting clamp procedure.

Overall, your technique isn't too bad. With plenty of practice you'll be able to fine tune it. My only concerns are the couple of points at the beginning of my post.

Regards

Paul

rich s
01-23-2010, 08:44 AM
I agree to a point. In fact what he does is set one machine clamp 3/4 up the string (backed up by a starting clamp) on Left 1, and then tensions right 1. In effect tensioning 1 & 3/4 strings i.e. the centre 2 mains. This is not a good way to start. When watching if for the 1st time I expected the OP to do a different process due to the incorrect tensioning of the centre 2 mains, but it didn't happen.

Also agree with the string having to go under the frame to reduce friction, and poss frame damage.

When cutting off the excess string at the end I wouldn't do with the point of the cutters going towards the frame so as to reduce the chance of frame damage.

Personally, I don't use a starting knot, but use the starting clamp procedure.

Overall, your technique isn't too bad. With plenty of practice you'll be able to fine tune it. My only concerns are the couple of points at the beginning of my post.

Regards

Paul

I think we are in agreement...... Left 1 never gets full tension applied to to it..... there is too much friction in the grommets for Right 1 and Left 2 to tension Left 1 fully and effectively....

If you were to check the tension on left 1 compared to right 1 it would be considerably lower.......

uk_skippy
01-23-2010, 09:04 AM
^^^^^^^

Yup, Left 1 never gets the full tension, but the whole of the tension is over 1 & 3/4 strings, so even right 1 doesn't get the intended tension. Now if he moved the anchor clamp all the way to the bottom and then started tensioning the right 1, and then right 2, then left 1 and left 2. That would be better.

Regards

Paul

rich s
01-23-2010, 09:10 AM
^^^^^^^

Yup, Left 1 never gets the full tension, but the whole of the tension is over 1 & 3/4 strings, so even right 1 doesn't get the intended tension. Now if he moved the anchor clamp all the way to the bottom and then started tensioning the right 1, and then right 2, then left 1 and left 2. That would be better.

Regards

Paul

Yes, Agree!!!!!!!

Mansewerz
01-23-2010, 09:14 AM
Just a tip. I notice that you alternate every main.

You're allowed to do 3 mains on one side, and then do 6 mains on the next because you'll always only be 3 ahead from the other side.

I personally set my anchor clamp, do 2 mains (center right and #2 right for example), then do the two on the alternate side. Now I have 4 of 16 mains on a 16x19/18 string pattern. So now i do three more on the side i'm on (now 5 on one side, 2 on the other), switch and do 6 on that next side (3 to catch up and then get ahead by 3), tie off, finish the otehr side.

aimr75
01-23-2010, 09:33 AM
thanks all for the replies, its helped alot in what i should do and has cleared alot of things up, cheers