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penang
01-24-2010, 09:17 PM
Say you are much better player than your partner. When every heavy topspin shots which is high and deep your partner will yelled Let in bounce. Will you get annoyed by that. As a solid 4.0 player you should be able to judge it yourself, when to hit on the rise or hit it at the back fence. I experienced this only partner with those who keep telling about their past glory.

A lot of times I lost concentration like I am a novice on the court. I am playing on a team but really can't take it anymore. Just wait for the moment to come and quit the team.

jserve
01-24-2010, 10:24 PM
Its not always about experience. Sometimes a different perspective can see things differently. I think its easier to tell where a ball is going to land from a side view, then when its whizzing right at my head.

dParis
01-24-2010, 10:39 PM
Say you are much better player than your partner. When every heavy topspin shots which is high and deep your partner will yelled Let in bounce. Will you get annoyed by that. As a solid 4.0 player you should be able to judge it yourself, when to hit on the rise or hit it at the back fence. I experienced this only partner with those who keep telling about their past glory.

A lot of times I lost concentration like I am a novice on the court. I am playing on a team but really can't take it anymore. Just wait for the moment to come and quit the team.
???

Can I get a translation?

Kaptain Karl
01-24-2010, 10:53 PM
You didn't say if you or your partner was right. Who was correct more often?

"Let it bounce" is too long to say. "Bounce it" is shorter ... more explosive in the speaking ... and comes across more urgently.

You should listen to your partner. That's part of why you are both on the same side of the net. You're supposed to be a team.

- KK

spaceman_spiff
01-25-2010, 01:21 AM
I think what he is saying is that, when he is at the baseline, his partner is telling him to let it bounce. He mentions being able to judge himself whether to hit it on the rise or back up and hit it from deep.

I can see how that would get annoying if it happens on every deep topspin shot. Unfortunately, I'm not sure how to politely tell someone you don't need them to constantly state the obvious to you.

spot
01-25-2010, 04:51 AM
We have one guy on our team who got in the habit of telling his girlfriend "bounce it" to mean that she should be calm and take the shot and play smart. But he started saying it to other players on ball that were going to be OBVIOUSLY in. I am a pretty heavy communicator on the court and nothing a partner has ever said to me has ever bothered me as much as this guy. Thankfully after heavy ridicule he has finally stopped.

To me if you say "bounce it" you better be SURE that the ball is going to land out.

raiden031
01-25-2010, 05:15 AM
I yell 'bounce' if say I'm at the net and the ball just passed me and I think its going to land out. I don't see what the problem is, it provides reinforcement for your partner in case they have doubts as to whether its going to land in or not.

zettabyte
01-25-2010, 05:31 AM
I'm not sure I get the point of "Bounce" to someone in the back court. Do people at the baseline typically hit the ball before it bounces?

If so, I've been playing tennis wrong...

jefferson
01-25-2010, 05:39 AM
I use bounce it when I know it is going out, but I think my partner is undecided on whether to take it out of the air. (Overhead or making his way into the net.) If he is playing the baseline, he is always going to let it bounce anyway.

We started to say bounce it, because you should not say out due to the opponents thinking the point has ended. When in reality it might land in sometimes and play will go on. I do not say LET it bounce because some opponents use that as an excuse to stop playing, due to a let call. Sometimes legitimately thinking a ball rolled on the court, but sometimes realizing they are out of the point and use it against you.

spot
01-25-2010, 05:44 AM
If I am at the baseline and I don't want my partner at the net hitting the ball, I'll call out "Me Me Me" just because I HATE to be wrong on telling someone that the ball is going to be out. By calling it for myself I am covered- if it does land in then its my responsbility to retrieve it.

raiden031
01-25-2010, 06:20 AM
I'm not sure I get the point of "Bounce" to someone in the back court. Do people at the baseline typically hit the ball before it bounces?

If so, I've been playing tennis wrong...

Because in doubles, people often S&V or chip & charge.

Cindysphinx
01-25-2010, 07:56 AM
I'm not sure I get the point of "Bounce" to someone in the back court. Do people at the baseline typically hit the ball before it bounces?

If so, I've been playing tennis wrong...

If you are at baseline, I will still say bounce it.

I cannot know whether you are on your way in and about to play that ball as an approach volley. Partners who are not as experienced playing the net will often hit balls that were going out.

I always consider "Bounce it" to be advisory. If my partner thinks it is going to land in *and* has a good play on the ball, she is free to overrule me. And of course if I say it too late, she may be in mid-swing and can play the ball rather than risk framing it by trying to lay off.

I had a partner flip out once when I played a ball she told me to bounce. To this day, I think that ball was going to land in. She continued muttering about it the entire rest of the point. This I did not appreciate. Not at all.

spot
01-25-2010, 08:07 AM
I think that the "bounce it" communication is far more important for women than it is for guys. I see women volleying the ball from the baseline a ton more than I have ever seen guys do it.

LeeD
01-25-2010, 08:37 AM
ONLY if my partner has a history of hitting out deep balls will I say anything, and that's usually "bounce".
When he's at net, there's not enough time to say anything and react, so I talk to him AFTER the point is lost. Like..."when you're at net, hard fast ball coming higher than your head....LET IT GO"......
On overheads, you decide when you're both initially heading for the ball, but still, I don't like to say anything during the point except "out" when the ball is out.

Nellie
01-25-2010, 09:21 AM
Don't let things bug you - I am sure that if you went to your partner and said - "Thanks for the help, but it is distracting me during the stroke and I would prefer not to have your input" you partner would shut up.

Instead, I am sure you said nothing, sat there, and stewed.

penang
01-25-2010, 09:27 AM
To correct the word, it is "bounce it".

I was really annoyed by this especially given from someone that I have to cover their back. And I would say, I am 90% correct on shots which will land in or outside the court. Unless I lost my concentration.

Just need some suggestion on how in a nice way to tell my partner "bounce it" is too much for me.

penang
01-25-2010, 09:31 AM
Don't let things bug you - I am sure that if you went to your partner and said - "Thanks for the help, but it is distracting me during the stroke and I would prefer not to have your input" you partner would shut up.

Instead, I am sure you said nothing, sat there, and stewed.

Thanks Nellie. That's me. Sat there and stewed. And blown the game and match away.

Cindysphinx
01-25-2010, 09:40 AM
To correct the word, it is "bounce it".

I was really annoyed by this especially given from someone that I have to cover their back. And I would say, I am 90% correct on shots which will land in or outside the court. Unless I lost my concentration.

Just need some suggestion on how in a nice way to tell my partner "bounce it" is too much for me.

I guess I don't understand the problem.

It is very common (and in my opinion it is good doubles) to communicate during points. It is to be encouraged, not discouraged. For a bounce it to be helpful, it has to come quickly, so sometimes the person offering the quick advice will be wrong.

All you have to do is say, "Hey, I appreciate it when you say to bounce it. Just know that if I think it is going to land in, I'm going to hit it anyway, and I might even take it out of the air. So stay on your toes, because the point might continue after you tell me to bounce it."

Personally, I find it much more annoying when a partner watches silently as you hit a ball that was going out and doubly annoying if they come up afterward and say, "You know, that was going out." Gee, thanks a lot.

Cindysphinx
01-25-2010, 09:42 AM
I think that the "bounce it" communication is far more important for women than it is for guys. I see women volleying the ball from the baseline a ton more than I have ever seen guys do it.

Huh? Who are these women?

The women I play with are far more likely to bounce a ball that never should be bounced than to take a ball out of the air while deep in the court.

jswinf
01-25-2010, 09:56 AM
It seems like it's been thrashed out that you're not going to volley these balls anyway. Maybe you could mention that to your partner and point out that if you hit one on the rise that turned out to be long you (or your partner) can still make an immediate "out" call as long as you don't wait to see how you like the results of your own shot.

spot
01-25-2010, 10:25 AM
Cindy- I have seen 3.5 level women volley balls from the baseline 10x as much as I have ever seen guys at any level do so. I mean really- you don't even see 3.5 women end up in no mans land, have trouble moving back and volley from there?

Cindysphinx
01-25-2010, 10:32 AM
If you are in no-man's land, you're not at the baseline.

penang
01-25-2010, 12:04 PM
I guess I don't understand the problem.

It is very common (and in my opinion it is good doubles) to communicate during points. It is to be encouraged, not discouraged. For a bounce it to be helpful, it has to come quickly, so sometimes the person offering the quick advice will be wrong.


Personally, I find it much more annoying when a partner watches silently as you hit a ball that was going out and doubly annoying if they come up afterward and say, "You know, that was going out." Gee, thanks a lot.

It will be helpful if the net person help to call if the shot was long. If I can't judge or time the ball where and when it's going to land, then I not qualified to play 4.0 in the first place. On few occasions, I had to hit when the shot come to me so fast or in bad position. If I let it bounce and the shot was good, it's already past me and I have no time to recover. Why not hit over the net and play safe and continue the point.
I should've mention this earlier, this is 4.0 level.

spot
01-25-2010, 12:09 PM
Cindy- you really don't know any 3.5 women who spend a lot of time in no mans land even when they are back in a 1 up 1 back formation?

blakesq
01-25-2010, 12:52 PM
is your partner mostly correct (ie. the balls usually go out), or mostly incorrect (ie. the balls usually stay in)? If the latter, tell him his "helping" is making you lose concentration and miss the balls. That should shut him up. If the former, then, I see no problem.

Say you are much better player than your partner. When every heavy topspin shots which is high and deep your partner will yelled Let in bounce. Will you get annoyed by that. As a solid 4.0 player you should be able to judge it yourself, when to hit on the rise or hit it at the back fence. I experienced this only partner with those who keep telling about their past glory.

A lot of times I lost concentration like I am a novice on the court. I am playing on a team but really can't take it anymore. Just wait for the moment to come and quit the team.

penang
01-25-2010, 06:03 PM
is your partner mostly correct (ie. the balls usually go out), or mostly incorrect (ie. the balls usually stay in)? If the latter, tell him his "helping" is making you lose concentration and miss the balls. That should shut him up. If the former, then, I see no problem.

I can't say if they were correct or incorrect. Because I know it is safer to let it bounce first. I don't hit a swing volley in no man zone unless I feel very confidence with my shot that day. The way they acted is, maybe they think they are too smart.
I would say I was correct most of the time when let it bounce. But when I hear bounce it, I started to change. Imagine, like mother will call every morning just to tell brush your teeth:)
I decided to quit than explaining and just wait for the Men's season to start.

jefferson
01-25-2010, 06:13 PM
I see basically all of the 3.5 ladies just camped out in No ladies land for the entire point! No matter how many times you explain the reason not to, they just can not help it!! And the often play balls that are going out, just because they are not sure if it is going out or not.

Steady Eddy
01-25-2010, 07:17 PM
My default style is to not say anything. I assume my partner won't volley "out" balls. But I've learned that somebody who volleys a line drive while standing on the baseline, will do that all day long. They snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. When I see that then I know I've got to do something when the opponents hit the ball out. Often I don't have time to say "bounce it" and it only comes out as "BOUNCE!".

ALten1
01-25-2010, 08:24 PM
I have never had a male partner tell me to bounce it. Just about every woman I play with will say those exact words though.

Cindysphinx
01-25-2010, 08:34 PM
Cindy- you really don't know any 3.5 women who spend a lot of time in no mans land even when they are back in a 1 up 1 back formation?

Yes and no.

I see this from players who do not move well, especially older ones. Male and female.

As I think of the doubles players on my team, I would have to say no, they don't camp in no man's land. If they are in no man's land, they are there for a reason. Camping, not so much. I really think my doubles players do pretty well with their positioning.

Like I said, I am surprised you are seeing a lot of this. Most of the ladies I know who are not comfortable at net won't step one toe inside the court if they can help it, and no way will they take a volley or overhead if they can bounce it.

spot
01-26-2010, 05:44 AM
On our mens and women's teams, the guys are a ton more mobile but we are a young team. EASILY I have seen a woman volley a ball near the baseline that was going out at least 10 times for every time I have seen a guy do it.

You and I see things similarly but with a different conclusion. With the women when I see it is when they get a short ball in no mans land, but don't have the confidence to hit it as an approach shot because they are worried about the lob. But they don't retreat back to proper position- they remain in no man's land until the next ball is hit. If the next ball is a deep ball they don't move back well enough to get behind the baseline where they can easily take it off of the bounce so they will take it however it gets to them. This will lead them to volleying a lot of balls and hitting balls that are going to be out.

I don't claim that all 3.5 women do this, just that I have seen it a TON more in 3.5 women than I ever have with the guys.

cak
01-26-2010, 08:41 AM
Huh? Who are these women?

The women I play with are far more likely to bounce a ball that never should be bounced than to take a ball out of the air while deep in the court.

Apparently they are all playing with me. I have more than one partner that will stand a foot inside the baseline and take everything shoulder height out of the air. Lucky for me, for at least one of these ladies, the shoulder height backhand volley from behind the service line is her bread and butter put away shot. Yeah, she's a freak.

Cindysphinx
01-26-2010, 01:41 PM
On our mens and women's teams, the guys are a ton more mobile but we are a young team. EASILY I have seen a woman volley a ball near the baseline that was going out at least 10 times for every time I have seen a guy do it.

You and I see things similarly but with a different conclusion. With the women when I see it is when they get a short ball in no mans land, but don't have the confidence to hit it as an approach shot because they are worried about the lob. But they don't retreat back to proper position- they remain in no man's land until the next ball is hit. If the next ball is a deep ball they don't move back well enough to get behind the baseline where they can easily take it off of the bounce so they will take it however it gets to them. This will lead them to volleying a lot of balls and hitting balls that are going to be out.

I don't claim that all 3.5 women do this, just that I have seen it a TON more in 3.5 women than I ever have with the guys.

Oh, OK. I see your point. I was thinking more like what CAK describes: Someone who quite literally camps in no man's land.

I think it is common for 3.5 women (I limit my remarks to that level and gender because that is what I know best) to have indecision when they get a short ball in doubles. If you whack a good approach deep crosscourt, the next ball will be a lob 90%+ of the time. So I would say they are getting a head start on the overhead/lob issue rather than camping because they don't know any better.

And personally, when I play lob queens or pushers in doubles, you can find me hanging out on the service line or deeper. Once I know a player doesn't have the spin or control to put the ball at my feet, I will most definitely adjust to defend the lob.

The fundamental issue is that 3.5 women know the lob is the most frequent reply to a strong shot, whereas a lot of 3.5 men won't hit a lob no matter what.

Cindy -- who plays 7.0 mixed with the working assumption that the 3.5 man will never, ever lob her

JHBKLYN
01-26-2010, 10:34 PM
I should've mention this earlier, this is 4.0 level.

Do you mean 7.0 mix or 8.0 mix because if you are in NYC, there is no 4.0 USTA leagues at the moment. I'm taking a wild guess that you are referring to 7.0 mix because if you are a 4.0, you're playing with a 3.0 female.

penang
01-27-2010, 12:51 AM
Do you mean 7.0 mix or 8.0 mix because if you are in NYC, there is no 4.0 USTA leagues at the moment. I'm taking a wild guess that you are referring to 7.0 mix because if you are a 4.0, you're playing with a 3.0 female.


I am not ready for 7.0. It was the other way, I practiced with 3.0 or 3.5 woman once awhile, they will always asked and keep telling how sorry they are when they didn't win the point. I just tell them it was not an easy shot. And don't worry about it. I did not expect any perfect game from them. I played at that level before, and know how it felt when didn't make a point on easy shot.
I don't think they ever worry about my game, they are more worried about themselves to play it right.