PDA

View Full Version : If all these fancy tennis racquet technology is true then...


Ryanrenesis
01-28-2010, 11:56 AM
... shouldn't be used in the automotive industry? What about construction? Watches? Phones? Computers? Etc.

If aerogel is really the "world's lightest solid" and 4000 times stronger than its own weight, would it not make sense for it to be used in cars to replace any of the following compositions: carbon fiber/fiber glass/plastic/metal?

If YOUTEK (d3o) siffens upon impact, would it not be useful to place some of this material collision-prone areas of a vehicle? Not even in the most expensive cars are they used (that I know of).

Could you guys think of any more uses for these "futuristic materials"?

It almost seems ******** to me if all of this material is so powerful, strong, light as they claim be, why isn't it being used elsewhere?

This has been on my mind for quite some time... What do you guys think? Has tennis racquet technology ever crossed industries? I've personally never heard of it.

mtommer
01-28-2010, 12:07 PM
This has been on my mind for quite some time... What do you guys think? Has tennis racquet technology ever crossed industries? I've personally never heard of it.

Tennis gets a lot of it's "tech" from skiis, running, golf and other activities. There are a lot of materials from NASA that were never used by NASA for anything. They were just found from research and don't always constitute anything more than an exercise in researching for the sake of curiosity.

JRstriker12
01-28-2010, 12:30 PM
... shouldn't be used in the automotive industry? What about construction? Watches? Phones? Computers? Etc.

If aerogel is really the "world's lightest solid" and 4000 times stronger than its own weight, would it not make sense for it to be used in cars to replace any of the following compositions: carbon fiber/fiber glass/plastic/metal?

If YOUTEK (d3o) siffens upon impact, would it not be useful to place some of this material collision-prone areas of a vehicle? Not even in the most expensive cars are they used (that I know of).

Could you guys think of any more uses for these "futuristic materials"?

It almost seems ******** to me if all of this material is so powerful, strong, light as they claim be, why isn't it being used elsewhere?

This has been on my mind for quite some time... What do you guys think? Has tennis racquet technology ever crossed industries? I've personally never heard of it.

Aerogel and d30 are not tennis technologies that transfered to other industries, they are technologies that were developed in other industries that the tennis industry adapted for its use.

One example - NASA use aerogel on space missions - such as to collect cosmic dust without damaging the dust they collected: http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/tech/aerogel.html

LOL- Ironically, they used a "tennis racket shaped" collector. No lie, check the link above.

It was also used to trap heat on the mars rover: http://marsrover.nasa.gov/mission/sc_rover_temp_aerogel.html

Check this photo out - 2 grams of aerogel supporting a 2kg brick:
http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/images/gallery/aerogelbrick_s.jpg

Source: http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/photo/aerogel.html

D30 is used in protective gear (pads, helmets, gloves) footwear, and even as sleeve to protect ipods - http://www.d3o.com/products.php

Both these materials seem pretty amazing in certain applications. As to whether they can make you a better tennis player - that is arguable. Unfortunately I haven't had a chance to try the youtech frames. But I could see how aerogel might be used to make a lighter, but stiffer frame - it just won't make you into Federer.

Ryanrenesis
01-28-2010, 12:39 PM
@JRStriker.
Wow... that was very informative! Thanks!

After u sending me that information, I've realized aerogel is actually aerogel (it isn't a fancy name Dunlop made up). Very interesting.

So I did some research for myself. This is pretty damn cool: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHnen2nSmDY

JRstriker12
01-28-2010, 01:12 PM
@JRStriker.
Wow... that was very informative! Thanks!

After u sending me that information, I've realized aerogel is actually aerogel (it isn't a fancy name Dunlop made up). Very interesting.

So I did some research for myself. This is pretty damn cool: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHnen2nSmDY

No prob. The tennis industry's use of some of these materials tends to be gimmicky, but outside of that, they have some interesting uses.

Gorecki
01-28-2010, 01:14 PM
If YOUTEK (d3o) siffens upon impact, would it not be useful to place some of this material collision-prone areas of a vehicle? Not even in the most expensive cars are they used (that I know of).


skiped physics 101 class did you?

to put it in simple manner, fyi, stiff materials would transfer the physical effects form the body of the car to your own body... guess who would end up with the "dents"...

adidasman
01-28-2010, 01:20 PM
Tennis gets a lot of it's "tech" from skiis, running, golf and other activities. There are a lot of materials from NASA that were never used by NASA for anything. They were just found from research and don't always constitute anything more than an exercise in researching for the sake of curiosity. Liquidmetal was used in branded golf clubs before Head licensed it for their use; I believe it's been used in other products as well.

benasp
01-28-2010, 04:19 PM
@JRStriker.
Wow... that was very informative! Thanks!

After u sending me that information, I've realized aerogel is actually aerogel (it isn't a fancy name Dunlop made up). Very interesting.

So I did some research for myself. This is pretty damn cool: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHnen2nSmDY

Yeah but is there aerogel in the racquet, that the real question ?

Wes_Loves_Dunlop
01-28-2010, 04:30 PM
The thing is, the heavier a car is, the more accident-safe it is.
Imagine, if a 2 cars collide at the same weight, at the same speed, both people were hurt about evenly.
If a car weighing 1 ton and another weighing only 500lbs collide, what happens to the lighter car? all the impact crushes the car and the driver is destroyed.

Thats the reason old classics are safer because they were made of solid steel, but they are heavy and have bad mileage

JRstriker12
01-28-2010, 06:06 PM
The thing is, the heavier a car is, the more accident-safe it is.
Imagine, if a 2 cars collide at the same weight, at the same speed, both people were hurt about evenly.
If a car weighing 1 ton and another weighing only 500lbs collide, what happens to the lighter car? all the impact crushes the car and the driver is destroyed.

Thats the reason old classics are safer because they were made of solid steel, but they are heavy and have bad mileage

Uhm no... old classics were horribly unsafe. While they were sturdy and heavy, they were built in a manner that transferred all the energy of the impact to the passengers. Plus they had very hard interiors that didn't cushion the impact if the passenger hit the dashboard or steering wheel.

Why do you think modern cars have crumple zones, soft plastic dashes and airbags? The crumple zones in modern cars are designed to absorb the impact while the cage around the passenger compartment is built to preserve the passenger space.

In a head on crash, I'll take a modern Volvo or Mercedes over a classic mustang, vette, caddy or even a classic Mercedes any day.

Here try this - put an egg in a metal box and drop if off a high building. The metal box may stay in place and not take much damage, but the egg will smash. Next build a box that will deform and abosorb the energy of the drop - while the package may take a lot of damage you can build it so the egg does not crash.

Now,if you want to say that in a crash between a small vehicle and a bigger vehicle, the smaller vehicle will get the bad end of it, then I would agree. But at the same time, larger vehicles have their own safety issues (roll overs, extended braking distances).

kimbahpnam
01-28-2010, 06:26 PM
Here try this - put an egg in a metal box and drop if off a high building. The metal box may stay in place and not take much damage, but the egg will smash. Next build a box that will deform and abosorb the energy of the drop - while the package may take a lot of damage you can build it so the egg does not crash.

I actually remember in 6th grade our class did this project by trying to create a packaged box that housed an egg inside. Then we threw it off a roof of a building. The goal was try to not break the egg. I wish I had the aerogel back then for this.

kerxny
01-28-2010, 07:15 PM
The thing is, the heavier a car is, the more accident-safe it is.
Imagine, if a 2 cars collide at the same weight, at the same speed, both people were hurt about evenly.
If a car weighing 1 ton and another weighing only 500lbs collide, what happens to the lighter car? all the impact crushes the car and the driver is destroyed.

Thats the reason old classics are safer because they were made of solid steel, but they are heavy and have bad mileage

The only reason they seem safer is because in the end, the car looked like it had been through nothing. THAT IS BAD. New cars crumble when in an accident because it's increasing the distance that you (or the car that's hitting you) has to slow down before coming to a complete stop. You want that, because you don't want all the energy of several thousand pounds moving at a high speed to be transferred into YOU.

tennis005
01-28-2010, 07:41 PM
Actually, the car crumpling and pieces flying off it absorbs alot of energy. That prevents the driver from receiving the full blow.

tennis005
01-28-2010, 07:45 PM
I actually remember in 6th grade our class did this project by trying to create a packaged box that housed an egg inside. Then we threw it off a roof of a building. The goal was try to not break the egg. I wish I had the aerogel back then for this.

I remember doing that in 3rd grade. Dropped a box off a 5 story building with the egg inside. The egg was completely intact. The sad part is, while we were walking to our classroom to show our class and teacher, the girl holding the egg tripped and the egg went splat. Ironic. It survived the 5 story plunge then got destroyed by a 2 foot drop.

Puddy
01-29-2010, 08:23 PM
The only reason they seem safer is because in the end, the car looked like it had been through nothing. THAT IS BAD. New cars crumble when in an accident because it's increasing the distance that you (or the car that's hitting you) has to slow down before coming to a complete stop. You want that, because you don't want all the energy of several thousand pounds moving at a high speed to be transferred into YOU.

I am not trying to prove anybody wrong or even support any given theory, but as a kid I was in a HUGE Ford LTD and was hit from behind by a classic VW Beetle. We sort of felt something, heard a crash and then discovered we had been hit. Our car was fine however the VW was nearly totalled on the front end. :?

Wes_Loves_Dunlop
01-29-2010, 08:48 PM
you're comparing two different things. Its like saying an offensive linesmen tackling a normal person. The linesman will feel almost nothing, while the normal person will feel like he just got hit by a car

AJK1
01-30-2010, 01:57 AM
Our club stringer cut off part of the head of about 5 different racquets to show us what's inside. Fed's Six One Tour is solid throughout, the others were hollow, but they all seemed to be made of the same material, graphite.
Don't believe the hype.

david5
01-30-2010, 02:02 AM
a car made out of aerogel might fly away wen theres strong winds XD

Puddy
01-31-2010, 11:37 PM
you're comparing two different things. Its like saying an offensive linesmen tackling a normal person. The linesman will feel almost nothing, while the normal person will feel like he just got hit by a car

Exactly. :)