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Marius_Hancu
01-29-2010, 06:49 AM
Hello:

I wonder if others have experienced this issue.

During winters only, I have some problems breathing at night, as I have to wake up and clear up the inside of my nose by washing it, say after 3-4 hours of sleep, and when waking up my mouth is dry.

The current heating system I have is with hot-water radiators. The issue was worse with electrical radiators, at a previous location.

I'm using a humidifier and I seem to be at about 50% humidity. Doctors said that's about right and that I should not open the windows, as that reduces the humidity.

Went to an ophtalmologist, he told me I should have a surgery for deviated sept, which other ophtalmologists said, when I was younger, shouldn't be a concern.

Then, when I went to the surgeon, he told me I should try first a cortison-based spray, Nasonex, and that there's little hope my condition would be alleviated by surgery (BTW, the surgery would not affect the bone, just the inside cartilage). However, this doctor sidestepped pointing the exact cause, saying I should try the spray, then come back to him in 4-5 months.

I hate cortison-based products. It seems it has some effect, but ...

I'm not aware of having any allergies.

Do others suffer from this?

charliefedererer
01-29-2010, 02:12 PM
Sorry to hear of your problem.
My impression is that what you describe is incredibly common.
I asked my wife, who is a primary care physician, and she said she probably has hundreds of patients that suffer from "winter rhinitis and sinusitis" flareups.
Unfortunately, she said few are truly "cured", and saline lavage is by far the most helpful therapy for most, along with use of a humidifier. Some are helped by cortisone sprays to reduce the inflammation. She is not a big fan of putting patients on them, but a trial course is probably the only way to find which patients will have a very positive response.

The following is from emedicine/web md:
"Intranasal corticosteroids
This class of medications is most effective. Intranasal corticosteroids are potent anti-inflammatory agents shown to decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms in more than 90% of patients. Presently, 9 medications are available in this class, and all are essentially equivalent in efficacy, although few head-to-head studies have been performed. Mometasone (Nasonex) and fluticasone furoate (Veramyst) have been demonstrated to have a somewhat faster onset of action; however, after one week, no difference is found between medications. Most can be used on a once-daily basis, and all have a similar safety profile. Nasonex is the only medication that did not show an affect on growth at one year. Veramyst did not show a growth affect in a 2-week study that is designed to evaluate for growth affects. A longer study began in late 2007." -http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/889259-treatment

The "growth effects" is the concern that in children small amounts of cortisone could be absorbed, and cause feedback inhibition of the pituitary gland, resulting in growth suppression.
Here is a link to information on possible Nasonex side effects: http://allergies.emedtv.com/nasonex/nasonex-side-effects.html

Here are some web sites with discussions of rhinitis and sinusitis:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/889259-overview
http://www.healthcentral.com/allergy/c/3989/57023/allergic-rhinitis
http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/Sinusitis/SIN_whatis.html
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chronic-sinusitis/DS00232
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/allergies/allergicconditions_rhinitis.shtml

Marius_Hancu
01-31-2010, 03:57 AM
Thanks for the pointers.

Any other sufferers of this condition around here?

EP1998
02-02-2010, 05:18 PM
Have you tried the Breathe Right nasal strips? I think they work.

The other thing you can do is make sure you do not have any dust in your room. Wash the bedding at least once a week in hot water. If you have heavy curtains, get rid of them and find something else for window coverings. Remove any books, TVs, etc.. You could buy an air purifier too.

charliefedererer
02-02-2010, 09:59 PM
Have you tried the Breathe Right nasal strips? I think they work.

The other thing you can do is make sure you do not have any dust in your room. Wash the bedding at least once a week in hot water. If you have heavy curtains, get rid of them and find something else for window coverings. Remove any books, TVs, etc.. You could buy an air purifier too.

The problem with finding a possible allergen is that it is like trying to solve the perfect crime.
While it is helpful to "round up the usual suspects", because there may be multiple allergans and non-allergans as a cause, and symptoms seem to wax an wane anyway, it's often difficult to tell what good, if any, some efforts result in.

007
02-03-2010, 04:19 AM
I think I have the same problem as you, Marius. Have had it my whole life. Don't want to have the surgery because my sister had it for same reason (septum) and it did little to fix her - she breathes only marginally better now. I always seem to be able to breathe fully out of only one nostril while the other is always restricted or partially restricted. I just live with it - it's 'normal' for me. Have dabbled with the sprays but really can't be bothered to succumb on them long-term.

jimanuel12
02-03-2010, 04:22 AM
Have you tried the Breathe Right nasal strips? I think they work.

The other thing you can do is make sure you do not have any dust in your room. Wash the bedding at least once a week in hot water. If you have heavy curtains, get rid of them and find something else for window coverings. Remove any books, TVs, etc.. You could buy an air purifier too.

they do work very well, now they even have an extra strip. it is larger and provides a better night's sleep.
i have used them for years without a problem.
my nazal passages are small and have always had trouble breathing at night, the strips help allot

FuriousYellow
02-03-2010, 02:13 PM
I used to do all that stuff: nasal strips, humidifier, nasal spray, Sudafed, and even had one ENT specialist talk me into doing a procedure involving passing electric current through the nasal membrane. None of that stuff brought more than temporary relief. I used to really suffer during dry winter months as you are, and could count on catching a cold every Fall and Spring.

Ever since I've been doing regular nasal irrigation (rinsing with warm saline) for the past three years, I rarely use any of that stuff. I think I've only had to take Sudafed 2-3 times in the last three years. Not only that, I don't catch my usual seasonal colds anymore.

I highly recommend trying it. It's certainly a lot cheaper than surgery. You can use the Neti Pot method or the more modern Grossan Hydro-Pulse, which is basically a water pick with a nasal attachment. The saline solution used for rinsing is basically the same salinity as those saline sprays used for moisturizing the nasal membranes.