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gatorbait01
01-29-2010, 11:19 AM
I've been playing tennis for about 5 yrs now. It seems as I've gotten better and increased my swing speed my rotator cuff is always sore after a match or hitting session. It gets sore from groundstrokes and not the serve. Is this normal? Most people I talk to don't think so.

It's really annoying to get a really sore arm the day after I play. I have been doing rotator cuff exercises pretty regularly, but the muscle soreness persists.

Any advice?

Sumo
01-29-2010, 11:26 AM
I hope you get some good responses.
I'm in the same boat you are.

charliefedererer
01-29-2010, 11:29 AM
Some soreness is to be expected.
Really sore? Not a good thing. Maybe you really should get checked out by a sports medicine orthopod with a special interest in shoulders. (Yes, medicine has gotten very specialized, and you would want to go to someone taking care of pitchers, quarterbacks and tennis players.)

You say you have "been doing rotator cuff exercises pretty regularly". Perhaps that needs to be changed to "religiously". Are you doing the thrower's ten? www.asmi.org/SportsMed/media/thrower10.swf

Are you quite sure there is not some flaw in your groundstroke technique that is causing/already caused an overuse abnormality?

Are you using a racquet that is not overly light and with a reasonable flex rating, and soft multifilament or natural gut strings?

BMC9670
01-29-2010, 11:31 AM
What are your racket specs? I got some bad advice when I got into tennis and used a light and headlight racket, which can lead to arm issues, especially when your strokes have improved to where your racket head speed is higher.

Head light is OK, but not in combination with a light racket. It's kind of like pitching with a whiffle ball - there is no weight behind it. Advanced players generally use heavy and head light rackets.

TW Staff
01-29-2010, 12:01 PM
I've been struggling with that same problem for a while now. Nothing is torn from what the PT examined. Basically, it's overuse and not enough core compensation. BMC is spot on with using a racquet that doesn't match the kind of game you play. Racquet and strings are important to consider tweaking when shoulder injuries arise.

In my case, I ice at least twice a day no matter what, and stretch regularly. That has helped an incredible amount which I strongly recommend. Sometimes all it needs is rest, which I take a full week off if the shoulder is feeling more sore than usual. Rotator cuffs are good, but you don't want to only work out that area if it's sore, because the muscle may just need rest. Switch up the shoulder exercises so your body doesn't get used to it.

For strokes I've been focusing more on bringing energy from my legs to my core so it's not so much upper body. I know it's hard to break habits, but it feels so much different when I explode more with my legs into the ball. It's a different power distribution rather than using my torso more which the PT said that was the bad habit.

- Kana, TW -

gatorbait01
01-29-2010, 12:33 PM
I've been doing some of the throwers 10 exersices about 2x/week. Maby more like 5-7 would be better. I don't do some of the wrist exercises.

I've just recently realized that the racket I use is too light, but for a different reason than the sore shoulder. I'm using the npro open which is really nice for putaways and dippers on passing shots. Recently I've been hitting with someone who hits a really heavy ball that is twisting the npro open in my hand so much, I'm getting really bad blisters. I also have a pure drive roddick which I don't use because I thought before it was too heavy to get as much topspin as I like. Just last night after getting more blisters I've decided to try that again.

I use topspin cyberflash strings. I'm not sure how changing the strings will help with muscle soreness though.

As far as a flaw in my groundstrokes, I'm not sure. I've taken a bunch of tennis lessons as a kid and now recently I took 8 lessons as an adult (33). No mention of bad mechanics was made on groundstrokes.

I know it's getting worse because I have a ball machine that when I fist bought I could use a lot and not get much muscle soreness in my rotator cuff. Now when I use that my arm is really sore the next day.

gatorbait01
01-29-2010, 12:39 PM
By the way, thanks for the good replies. If anyone has anything more to add, please do.

samster
01-29-2010, 01:17 PM
I've been doing some of the throwers 10 exersices about 2x/week. Maby more like 5-7 would be better. I don't do some of the wrist exercises.

I've just recently realized that the racket I use is too light, but for a different reason than the sore shoulder. I'm using the npro open which is really nice for putaways and dippers on passing shots. Recently I've been hitting with someone who hits a really heavy ball that is twisting the npro open in my hand so much, I'm getting really bad blisters. I also have a pure drive roddick which I don't use because I thought before it was too heavy to get as much topspin as I like. Just last night after getting more blisters I've decided to try that again.

I use topspin cyberflash strings. I'm not sure how changing the strings will help with muscle soreness though.

As far as a flaw in my groundstrokes, I'm not sure. I've taken a bunch of tennis lessons as a kid and now recently I took 8 lessons as an adult (33). No mention of bad mechanics was made on groundstrokes.

I know it's getting worse because I have a ball machine that when I fist bought I could use a lot and not get much muscle soreness in my rotator cuff. Now when I use that my arm is really sore the next day.

poly strings are no good for achy joints. i thought this was common knowledge?

charliefedererer
01-29-2010, 01:53 PM
You generate a lot of shock when you strike the ball. A heavier, more flexible frame with softer strings will dissipate more of that shock than ... your arm/shoulder ... which is the only other thing that can dampen the shock if your frame/strings aren't.

"Shock (frame): Initial, high-amplitude oscillation (jarring) of the racquet during or immediately after ball contact. Often confused with frame vibration, frame shock is generally believed to contribute more to wrist, elbow and/or shoulder injuries than vibration. Generally, a smaller, stiffer, lighter racquet strung at high tension will produce more shock than a larger, flexible, lightweight frame strung loosely. Off-center hits also increase the amount of shock transmitted to the hand and arm. In fact, if you can hit the Center of Percussion (COP) area of the sweetspot each time, your shots will be shock-free. Certain handle systems (for example, Prince's Air+ Comfort Handle and Head's ShockStop) are effective in reducing shock before it reaches the hand. Additionally, Wilson's Triad Technology and Pro Kennex's Kinetic System Technology are designed to absorb frame shock. After-market methods of reducing frame shock include adding weight to the frame, lowering string tension, using a thinner gauge string and increasing grip size (to a point) to reduce torque. String vibration dampers are ineffective at reducing or absorbing frame shock." -http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/LC/RacquetStringTerms.html

The Pure Drive Roddick is a very stiff racquet. How about one of the Volkl or Dunlop player's racquets? There is a lot of advice in the racquet section of this forum.

charliefedererer
01-29-2010, 01:58 PM
I've been doing some of the throwers 10 exersices about 2x/week. Maby more like 5-7 would be better. I don't do some of the wrist exercises.


If you are really sore you'll have to rest from both exercise and tennis. But to improve your tennis arm stamina and help to prevent overuse injury/pain, it would help to do the exercises more often.
The purpose of the wrist exercises is to strengthen the forearm. Weak forearm muscles are much more likely to lead to tennis elbow and wrist problems, the other bains of tennis players aside from shoulder problems.

gatorbait01
01-29-2010, 05:27 PM
Ok, I've received some good advice, thanks. I've always believed the poly strings weren't causing my sore shoulder because it's muscle soreness, not tendon discomfort. I believed that it was only due to my external rotators resisting or stopping my arm on the follow through.

I'm going to change the strings and see how I feel, even though I do believe they help my game a lot:(

I'll probrably take it further and start demoing some more flexible players rackets as well as discipline myself to do the throwers 10 more often. At least for the most part I can do than inside because it is time consuming, but I absolutely do not want a rotator cuff injury.

gatorbait01
02-01-2010, 10:16 AM
Just wanted to bump this thread for comments on my last post about having muscle soreness in my shoulder (rotator cuff). Could that really be due to poly strings? It's not anything like tendonitis.

mike53
02-01-2010, 12:08 PM
I would be real careful about doing the throwers 10 routine more than every other day. The resistance tube exercises would be good as part of a warm up and could be done daily, but I would always have a recovery day before I repeated the rest of the routine.

Light exercise of the affected area can relieve muscle soreness. My idea of light exercise for my shoulder is arm circles holding a 2 pound soft weight, simulated throwing and swinging motions with the same 2 lb weight, dynamic stretching, and the resistance tube exercises above.

TW Staff
02-01-2010, 12:45 PM
Everything works together whether it be a sore tendon or muscle. The vibrations effect everything in your shoulder. Depending on the string depends on how much vibration and shock absorption takes place when you hit the ball. The harder the string, the more jarring it will be on your arm/shoulder. A softer string helps absorb the impact. Cyberflash is a pretty good poly, but it's still a poly. Multifilaments are great to try when you have any type of arm/shoulder injury since their softer and absorb impacts better.

There's a difference between muscle soreness from working out, and overuse, irritation, and inflammation of the muscle which can put you out of tennis for a while which sounds like what you have. In my experience, I had to take a full month off because the PT said the muscle was just irritated. If anything you could try hybriding your string set up with a multi or syn gut to try that out. I love a poly/natty gut hybrid if you don't mind the cost, but currently with my shoulder I've moved to a full multi at a low tension.

- Kana, TW -

SystemicAnomaly
02-01-2010, 01:55 PM
Most tennis players don't start developing rotator & other shoulder problems until they approach their 50s and have been playing for a while. Shoulder problems are also common in other sports where an overhand throwing motion is employed.

The poly strings can definitely be a major contributor to shoulder and other arm problems. At about 11 oz, your nPro Open racket is not really ultralight but it appears to have a very low swingweight (very head-light). This can be another contributing factor. You might consider adding another 10-15 grams (of lead tape) to the 3 and 9 o'clock positions of your frame.

Your stroke mechanics may also be another factor. Make sure than you are employing a generous knee bend -- the legs should extend from that bent position as the racket head drops behind you (after the trophy position). They should be fully extended as the racket starts to come up from its dropped position.

Also be sure that you are coiling prior to or during your toss (and your grip is fairly loose). When you uncoil you should be using some hip rotation, a lot torso rotation (shoulder-over-shoulder), arm extension, and forearm rotation (pronation). Proper use of these other (kinetic chain) links should help to minimize the stresses of your shoulder rotations. It could be that you are relying too much on the shoulder to initiate power.

tennis005
02-01-2010, 07:15 PM
Its good to take a week off every now and then. Gives your body a nice period to recover.

Blade0324
02-02-2010, 11:27 AM
I want to chime in with some info on this as well. You mention that you have soreness in the rotator cuff after playing. Can you be more specific on where in the shoulder you feel the soreness (front, side, back etc.) Also is it more sore when you lift the arm up to or just about shoulder level?

I ask these things as I have had some soreness in the back of my shouler recently that I have not experienced before. I just came from a sport med. ortho this AM and had it checked out. What I was told is absolutely no problem in the rotator cuff but I have an impengment on a tendon a little bit. Just an overuse type of thing. He recommended that I load up on ibuprofin before playing any significant amout. For example I will be starting a tournament this friday and he said I should be taking 800mg of IB 4 times a day for 3 days before the start of the tourney and then take 800-1000mg IB post match each day during the tourney. Also Ice right after playing for about 15-20 min. and then treat with heat the rest of the time between matches.
He informed me that the Impengment is not a problem and nothing to worry about but if I get a chance post tournament to give it 1-2 weeks rest and it will feel much better.

Just a bit of a different direction on the shoulder issue for you all to think about.

gatorbait01
02-02-2010, 12:00 PM
The shoulder gets sore in the back. It doesn't get any worse when lifting my arm, but when doing the stretch where you take your arm behing your back and push your hand up towards you neck, I can feel the sore area stretch. Same thing I notice when sitting with arms at side, bend forearms to 90deg in front and then rotate out. I think for sure it's my external rotators. My soreness feels like muscular pain, does yours feel muscular or like a tendon? Just curious

Blade0324
02-02-2010, 12:15 PM
Mine feels like muscle pain as well. I feel it in when doing the movements you are describing as well. Do you feel it when you keep arm straight, wrist in neutral position and lift arm straight out to side and then up to straight up position. I get the pain when my hand is just above shoulder or head level and then it gets better as the arm goes more straigt up.

SystemicAnomaly
02-02-2010, 04:54 PM
The shoulder gets sore in the back. It doesn't get any worse when lifting my arm, but when doing the stretch where you take your arm behing your back and push your hand up towards you neck, I can feel the sore area stretch....

It sound like internal rotation rather than external rotation. Check the link below for shoulder ROM tests:

http://www.nismat.org/orthocor/exam/shoulder.html#Evaluation

.

coyfish
02-02-2010, 06:52 PM
I dislocated my right shoulder at had some pains with my rotator while playing tennis. Rotator cuff exercise in the gym helped a lot. Keep in mind keep them light and comfortable.

charliefedererer
02-02-2010, 08:31 PM
The shoulder gets sore in the back. It doesn't get any worse when lifting my arm, but when doing the stretch where you take your arm behing your back and push your hand up towards you neck, I can feel the sore area stretch. Same thing I notice when sitting with arms at side, bend forearms to 90deg in front and then rotate out. I think for sure it's my external rotators. My soreness feels like muscular pain, does yours feel muscular or like a tendon? Just curious

When we serve or hit killer forehands, we are throwing the weight of our arm and our racquet as hard as we can.

But we need to stop all that forward force.

The external rotators of the shoulder and the muscles that stabilize the scapula are the muscles that have to brake that forward force:

"Rotator Cuff and Shoulder Blade Stabilization

When you talk about tennis and the shoulder the first thing that likely comes to mind is the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is important in tennis, but often times strength imbalances exist within the rotator cuff that can lead to injury. Most notably, tennis players tend to be weak in the muscles that externally rotate the shoulder. External rotation is an outward rotation and is the opposite of the shoulder motion players make when they serve or hit a forehand. To improve strength of the external rotators you can perform the exercises described in this section of the web page. This exercise should be performed with the dominant arm, but should really be performed with both arms if time permits.

Not many people think of the upper back when considering how to strengthen and protect the shoulder. But try this simple drill. Place your hand on the shoulder blades of a player and ask him to raise his arms. Can you feel the shoulder blades move? Shoulder movement is very complex and involves movement of the shoulder blade as well as the actual shoulder joint itself. Weakness in the upper back muscles that stabilize the shoulder blades can cause the shoulder to function improperly and may actually contribute to shoulder pain. Exercises that train the stabilizers of the shoulder blade can help tennis players optimize performance and avoid shoulder injury.

Exercise: Standing External Rotation with Elastic Band
Exercise: Straight Arm Rowing"
http://www.playerdevelopment.usta.com/content/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=114707&itype=7418

So what you are doing is progressively stretching the muscles/tendons of this area.

If you do the above exercises, and better yet the entire Rower's 10, (AFTER your symptoms/inflammation have quieted down) you will strengthen the muscles in the shoulder area so they can better resist the stretching they get as they strain to brake your powerful forward strokes.

As bad as the soreness you are now feeling, this is actually a warning sign of worrse problems to come.
If the external rotators and stabilizers of the scapula get too "stretched out" from being forced to break the forward forces, but are not sufficiently strong, then the breaking action will be transferred to the much smaller ligaments and tendons of the rotator cuff itself. That is how to really blow out a shoulder.

So do yourself a favor and let the pain/inflammation subside, then start building up these muscles with the thrower's ten.

charliefedererer
02-02-2010, 08:56 PM
I want to chime in with some info on this as well. You mention that you have soreness in the rotator cuff after playing. Can you be more specific on where in the shoulder you feel the soreness (front, side, back etc.) Also is it more sore when you lift the arm up to or just about shoulder level?

I ask these things as I have had some soreness in the back of my shouler recently that I have not experienced before. I just came from a sport med. ortho this AM and had it checked out. What I was told is absolutely no problem in the rotator cuff but I have an impengment on a tendon a little bit. Just an overuse type of thing. He recommended that I load up on ibuprofin before playing any significant amout. For example I will be starting a tournament this friday and he said I should be taking 800mg of IB 4 times a day for 3 days before the start of the tourney and then take 800-1000mg IB post match each day during the tourney. Also Ice right after playing for about 15-20 min. and then treat with heat the rest of the time between matches.
He informed me that the Impengment is not a problem and nothing to worry about but if I get a chance post tournament to give it 1-2 weeks rest and it will feel much better.

Just a bit of a different direction on the shoulder issue for you all to think about.

I hope you read the above post as well, because there is reason to worry about "just an overuse type of thing",

Orthopods are often caring for athletes in mid season that want desperately to get through the next game or tournament.
I am sure your orthopod gave you the best advice to get through your tournament. And I am sure he was right that there is not now a serious injury. (And please, I am not questioning his judgement or disparaging him in any way. I just am letting you know that you may have quickly convinced him that playing this tournament was very important to you, and his recommendations followed from that starting point.)

But all of us in sports have to weigh our warrior mentality with what is really best for our health. Reading between the lines, my guess is that your orthopod if pressed would tell you that the best thing for your shoulder would be that rest now, not after the tournament. Obviously only you can judge how important it is to play right now.

As for the Ibuprofen advice, Ibuprofen can decrease inflammation to some extent. But it only blocks one (the cyclooxygenase) of the many inflammatory pathways. So how much actual inflammation it really is blocking is controversial. What is not controversial is that in the dosages described it is a very good pain reliever. The only problem with that is that is that it can mask the pain which is the best indication of the level of inflammation that is going on. So there is the risk of playing to a more serious injury level with the pain masked. And once an area undergoes further injury, even if "just" an overuse injury, it takes longer for that area to come back.

Anyway, I wish you a speedy recovery, and hope the area calms down before your tournament so you can proceed in the best of health.

bertrevert
02-02-2010, 09:35 PM
Thank you charliefederer for that USTA link and assoc exercises - have been following this thread and I will do these exercises tonight.

Blade0324
02-03-2010, 07:30 AM
Yep I agree CharlieFed. Thanks for the great write. I agree that the Doc was probably giving me some advice on how to get through this tourney. I am going to take about 2 weeks off post tourney and see then how the shoulder feels. I can say that now, if I take 2 days off the shoulder is much better feeling and much stronger then when playing daily.
Yes the doc recommended rest as well. I do a good bit of strength training and excercise for tennis in specific as well as dynamic stretching pre match and regular stretching post match.

Also thanks for the heads up on the IB thing too. All good things to keep in mind.

larry 4.0
02-03-2010, 08:29 AM
All in all, because tennis is a pronatory-flexion dominant sport (as really all sports are), if not countered, orthopedic changes are occuring beyond simple imbalances within the RC musculature. The thoracic curvature becomes overly kyphotic, which in turn alters the scapula dynamics, that is in turn intimate with the humerus. So in effect, one really has to look at the root as opposed to the branch. On the other side of the equation, the front panel musculature (pec major/minor) adaptively shortens, and creates passive impedance to these structures. Length-tension is altered, posture is poor, and pain manifests. Have a CHEK practitioner or manual med specialist assess you for these things. The difference in pain vs pain-free can be just millimeters apart...hope this helps

athiker
02-03-2010, 10:23 AM
I have impingement in my shoulder and have had good results mitigating the pain via PT initially (over 10 years ago) to strengthen the muscles in my shoulder and back. I will go through periods when I don't do the band exercises and sure enough the pain starts to come back when I do any throwing type sports or tennis. My pain is when I lift my arms over my head too far and the sore spot is behind my shoulder. It never really goes completely away, the impingement that is, but allows me to play pretty pain free if I keep on top of it with exercise. I will never be completely reaching for the sky on a serve for example, but I can get pretty good range of motion without pain.

"The Standing External Rotation with Elastic Band" exercise above actually causes me pain and I do not do that one. I stand sideways to the band mounting point, active arm away from the mounting point, hold my elbow at 90 degrees across my stomach and rotate externally to the side. I also do internal rotations but mostly just for balance or a rest between external sets.

I also will hold a band handle in each hand and do extensions at a 45 degree angle to the ground starting with both hands at my chest. For example my right hand/arm extends out and up at a 45 and my left hand/arm extends out and down at a 45. Both hands return to my chest after extension. Then I switch which hand is going up/down. This doesn't cause pain in my shoulder but works the muscles.

Any rowing motion is good with the bands, or even better using a quality rowing machine is great.

Having a few different strength bands is good. You want the right tension. A workout but not a full on max pull with any kind of jerky motion. Good form is important. One last suggestion is to make sure you do these exercises, any exercise, with good posture and a firm core. A good way to align your shoulders is to bring both your hands directly above your head, rotate your palms outward, elbows to the side and bring your arms back down to your side. Sounds silly but try it and see how your shoulders feel. A slight knee bend will also give you a firm base and firm your core. Good luck.

athiker
02-03-2010, 10:34 AM
It gets sore from groundstrokes and not the serve.
Any advice?

Hey gatorbait, just curious. Do you hit w/ a 1HBH or a 2HBH?

Blade0324
02-03-2010, 12:10 PM
I have impingement in my shoulder and have had good results mitigating the pain via PT initially (over 10 years ago) to strengthen the muscles in my shoulder and back. I will go through periods when I don't do the band exercises and sure enough the pain starts to come back when I do any throwing type sports or tennis. My pain is when I lift my arms over my head too far and the sore spot is behind my shoulder. It never really goes completely away, the impingement that is, but allows me to play pretty pain free if I keep on top of it with exercise. I will never be completely reaching for the sky on a serve for example, but I can get pretty good range of motion without pain.

"The Standing External Rotation with Elastic Band" exercise above actually causes me pain and I do not do that one. I stand sideways to the band mounting point, active arm away from the mounting point, hold my elbow at 90 degrees across my stomach and rotate externally to the side. I also do internal rotations but mostly just for balance or a rest between external sets.

I also will hold a band handle in each hand and do extensions at a 45 degree angle to the ground starting with both hands at my chest. For example my right hand/arm extends out and up at a 45 and my left hand/arm extends out and down at a 45. Both hands return to my chest after extension. Then I switch which hand is going up/down. This doesn't cause pain in my shoulder but works the muscles.

Any rowing motion is good with the bands, or even better using a quality rowing machine is great.

Having a few different strength bands is good. You want the right tension. A workout but not a full on max pull with any kind of jerky motion. Good form is important. One last suggestion is to make sure you do these exercises, any exercise, with good posture and a firm core. A good way to align your shoulders is to bring both your hands directly above your head, rotate your palms outward, elbows to the side and bring your arms back down to your side. Sounds silly but try it and see how your shoulders feel. A slight knee bend will also give you a firm base and firm your core. Good luck.

Good feedback. Sounds exactly like my situation.

SystemicAnomaly
02-03-2010, 12:48 PM
It sound like internal rotation rather than external rotation. Check the link below for shoulder ROM tests:

http://www.nismat.org/orthocor/exam/shoulder.html#Evaluation

.

gatorbait01, did you try the ROM tests in the link above? I've got a serious external (shoulder) rotation problem and I can easily do the test that you mentioned. I've also have a bit of a problem with shoulder flexion. Quite often shoulder problems will affect more than one type of shoulder articulation.

charliefedererer
02-03-2010, 02:27 PM
I have impingement in my shoulder and have had good results mitigating the pain via PT initially (over 10 years ago) to strengthen the muscles in my shoulder and back. I will go through periods when I don't do the band exercises and sure enough the pain starts to come back when I do any throwing type sports or tennis. My pain is when I lift my arms over my head too far and the sore spot is behind my shoulder. It never really goes completely away, the impingement that is, but allows me to play pretty pain free if I keep on top of it with exercise. I will never be completely reaching for the sky on a serve for example, but I can get pretty good range of motion without pain.

"The Standing External Rotation with Elastic Band" exercise above actually causes me pain and I do not do that one. I stand sideways to the band mounting point, active arm away from the mounting point, hold my elbow at 90 degrees across my stomach and rotate externally to the side. I also do internal rotations but mostly just for balance or a rest between external sets.

I also will hold a band handle in each hand and do extensions at a 45 degree angle to the ground starting with both hands at my chest. For example my right hand/arm extends out and up at a 45 and my left hand/arm extends out and down at a 45. Both hands return to my chest after extension. Then I switch which hand is going up/down. This doesn't cause pain in my shoulder but works the muscles.

Any rowing motion is good with the bands, or even better using a quality rowing machine is great.

Having a few different strength bands is good. You want the right tension. A workout but not a full on max pull with any kind of jerky motion. Good form is important. One last suggestion is to make sure you do these exercises, any exercise, with good posture and a firm core. A good way to align your shoulders is to bring both your hands directly above your head, rotate your palms outward, elbows to the side and bring your arms back down to your side. Sounds silly but try it and see how your shoulders feel. A slight knee bend will also give you a firm base and firm your core. Good luck.

Thanks for sharing your personal experience. It's great of you to give some of the little pointers that you gleaned in your own workouts. I must say I can't believe how much I have learned on this health and fitness site.

gatorbait01
02-06-2010, 08:26 PM
Wow, I got busy and haven't checked on this thread in a while. Lots of more good info thx.

Athiker I hit with a 2 handed backhand.

Systemic Anomoly I just saw your post and haven't checked out the website yet, but will do so. Thanks for your contribution.

I'm surprised that I haven't been stretching my rotator cuff much, but I'm following Kana's advice and stretching every day. I'm also just swinging the racket more to condition the muscles. Just for about 10-15 minutes every couple of days, not enough to get sore. For the last 6 months after my son was born, I've only been getting out 1/week which I think is contributing to getting sore. It's for sure not the only reason because prior to that I was getting out a good 3/week and would sometimes get extremely sore after a match. Sometimes I wouldn't have any soreness.

gatorbait01
02-06-2010, 08:35 PM
SystemicAnomaly, I checked out the website and the first two stretches will make the sore "feel it". The first is for the external rotators and the second is for the internal. I'm not positive it's the externals anymore, but I still think it is, just playing the odds. I googled a while back about rotator cuff injuries and more often it's the externals that are weaker and get injured.

gatorbait01
02-06-2010, 09:14 PM
From your website I realized I wasn't likely even stretching the shoulder properly though. I was just doing the behind the back stretch. I googled how to strech rotator cuff and came across a good website with a lot of stretches. If anyone wants to check it out. Not sure how to make the link live.
http://www.shoulder-pain-management.com/shoulderrotatorcuffexercises.html

Blade0324
02-10-2010, 02:00 PM
Just went to a PT as I am in the middle of a tourney. Got a Kiniseo taping done as well as a mobilization treatment. WOW what a difference. For any of you that have an impingement this would be well worth your while even if you have to pay for it outright (cost me $60). This initial phase of course is temporary but I will be continuing with them in the coming weeks to get the shoulder in the correct position to stop the impingement. Just thought I'd add a little more to the thread since it has been such a help to me so far.

gatorbait01
03-09-2010, 06:13 AM
Wanna say thanks to those who helped on this thread.

I've been doing rotator cuff exercises 3-4x week and making sure I swing the racket at least 4x/week. So if I play tennis 2x/week, I'll just swing the racket up to about 3/4 speed in the garage for 10-15 minutes 2x/week. I've been stretching every day and now I'm getting little to no soreness after a match. Very excited and happy.

charliefedererer
03-09-2010, 09:26 AM
Glad to hear you are doing better. Thanks for letting us know.